Jump to content

Recommended Posts

So my question is this. What helmet is the safest? 

I've just had a big crash and I can't decide if my old helmet absorbed some of the impact and helped save me or if it was to weak. The mouthpiece cracked and folded and I ended up with a fractured face and jaw. My old helmet was one of the most expensive going as I'm a believer in safety but I'm not sure if safety was compromised over weight. 

 

So what's the opinion on the best helmet? Money and looks or paint schemes don't come into the equation. 

I was looking at a fox v3 mips as I like the idea of mips but I read on here that someone broke the jaw piece similar to my old helmet. 

I like the idea of the 6D but it seems pretty heavy.

The Leatt seems like a good helmet?

I have owned a Shoei VFX-W in the past and had no issues. I regarded it as the safest helmet available at the time with the most testing and research. Is the Shoei old technology or is it technology that really works?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

first of all if your helmet was needed  or according to the manufactures the helmet is older and used  the energy absorption padding gets crushed and should be thrown away.  I have read from some manufacture you should replace a helmet after five years from wear  and also hopefully a better designed helmet.     get atleast  a snell/dot certified helmet  knowing that the design is either pass or fail, the helmet you are purchasing was not tested, and there is no grading  no superiors  or adequate.     most importantly  that you can control is to buy a helmet that fits snug, almost too tight squeezing your head. Helmets that come with fitting pads are worth it and take the time to set it up . A lighter helmet is advantageous to prevent neck injuries when hammering thru whoops  or landing hard

 not really wanting to but if able to reenact the same type of crash I would prefer a helmet that shattered to nothing and I walked away over a helmet that  still looked good and I was knocked out.

this is  a lawyerspeak/ lawsuit riddled question that there is no cure all. the best helmet is the one on your head that you never need. the second best is the one that hopefully helps prevent head trauma at that particular instance you need it

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. I probably have to replace my helmets every couple of years if I'm riding alot as they become too slack. 

I just wondered if there was any solid thoughts about the best helmet. I've ran Arai and Shoei in the past because I heard they are the safest and conduct the most testing. My crash was in an Airoh and I suffered a fractured face and jaw and I ended up unconscious with no memory of the crash. Thinking back the shell size is smaller which means it can't absorb as much energy through the lining because there's not as much of it. 

I just wondered if I was wearing a Shoei the mouth piece would have stayed in one piece and the bigger lining would have absorbed more energy. Maybe the situation would have been better in a Leatt or 6D helmet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if dot or Snell tests the face mask. I wouldn't be surprised if there was a standard that does. Maybe do some research into what each certification means. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A quick search says that Snell is the only one to test the face mask. So, if that's your concern, there's your first criteria. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks good point. I tried researching the testing of the individual helmets but it may be worth me looking into how the tests are conducted by the certification process

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read an article that says if a helmet is Snell 2010 approved it is likely to also pass DOT and ECE testing. Interestingly I can't find anything to say the Airoh Aviator is Snell approved. But also I found a thread where someone had broken the mouth piece off a Fox V3 and injured themselves pretty badly and the V3 is Snell approved. 

Maybe it was just to much of an impact for the helmet to absorb. Its hard to judge.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No helmet is perfect, and if it didn't give at all, it would be like not wearing a helmet at all. A broken face is better than brain dead. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×