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What Tire Pressures Are You Running?

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Pretty basic question:  What tire pressures are you guys running and on what type of tires?

 

Spec for my YZ450F is 15psi front and rear.  That's what I'm running, but seems like I'm having a real hard time getting the rear tire to hook.  Last ride was at Jewell MX track where the surface is clay and mud.  Ride before that was at Rampart Range on loose gravel.  But the rear tire likes to slip when I romp on it.  How low of tire pressure can you run before you start risking getting flats?  Tires themselves aren't new, but should have enough tread for traction.

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depends on the tire.  Low pressures usually feel better, but increases the chance of damage and failure.  

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I used to run 11 psi front and 13 rear but pinch flats and tube wear were a problem.  Now I run 15 front and 17 rear and I get along just fine.  I don't think I've low sided or washed out in at least a year. 

I find a little higher rear tire pressure helps keep the tire lit up.  To much traction can upset the bike mid corner if it tries to hook up in the middle of a big sandy berm.  Sometimes wheel spin is good.

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20/20 on street.  15/12 on dirt.  12/10 if it's real technical dirt. 

I know these are the right pressures, because they're what I run.  So it obviously has to be right. 

 

:rolleyes:

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There is literally no correct answer to this question.  It greatly depends on the stiffness of the tire carcass and the terrain and type and speed of riding you do.

With a stiffer carcass tire I have run as low as 5 psi rear.  However we ride exclusively tight, slow, technical single track on hard, slippery terrain.

With a softer carcass tire I'd run around 7 psi on the rear.

With a trials tire I have to run about 10 psi on the rear.

Never once had a pinch flat in three seasons of riding.  It is important to pull the tube and clean off rubber dust from the tube and inside the tire at least once a season.  Tubes need to be replaced every couple of seasons or every couple of tires, whichever comes first.

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Your going to get a lot of different answer's to this.

Tire pressure depends on tires, tubes and personal preference.

I run 13-14 front with 11-12 psi rear on my yz 250 with a Gibson mx 1.1 front and kenda parker dt rear, the front tube is a kenda heavy duty, the rear a bridgestone UHD. I hit some rocks that are 1/2 buried in sand at high speed some times so I cant go much lower without getting pinch flats. I run 15 front and 12 rear on my wr250r with a kenda Washougal or Pirelli extra x front and kenda parker dt or trackmaster rear, it has v rubber heavy duty tubes front and back, its ridden the same places as the yz but its heavier especially the front end so it needs more psi up front. The parker dt rear is a little stiffer than most mx tires so its pretty hard to pinch flat at 12 psi, similar to a maxxis desert IT but the kenda's not quite as stiff, if I had michelin, Pirelli, dunlop or bridgestone rear tire I'd need a couple more psi to avoid pinch flats as they have softer side walls.

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I covered most of this in another recent post but...

Firstly I use IRC Heavy Duty tubes but IMO the rear is Ultra Heavy Duty. You can do your research and there are Extreme and Ultra's and you can see some of the many options here if your interested https://fortnine.ca/en/dirt-bike-motocross-tire-tubes.

I carry a half decent digital PSI gauge and a small double action pump (usually have a floor pump in my van). Before every ride I check PSI. If for some reason I feel I need to increase PSI on a ride I have the pump :)

Then depending on tires, terrain (off road) and time of year/weather...

Front - 12ish to 8ish

Rear - 12ish to 2ish

I can't remember the last time I pinch flatted if ever and my last flat was from a spike in the rear.

As I mentioned in the other posted it took me a few years before I could start telling how different tires performed then its only been the last few years I've been playing with PSI and if you feel confident in not flatting or are prepared to deal with a flat, PSI is easy and free to play with and IMO you might be surprised how low you can go with certain tires/terrain and specifically the rear.

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Thanks for the replies everyone!  I understand there is no right or wrong answer here.  I was more interested in hearing how low you can go, and apparently pretty damn low with the correct tire on.  

 

I was trying to practice riding 2nd gear wheelies on Sunday, but just ended up spinning the tire for the most part.  Not that I'm trying to be a stunt rider,  just would like to learn how to control all the freaking torque my bike has to offer.  Plus, of the all the years I've been riding, I've never really ever tried riding wheelies out.  Always just popped the front wheel and hammered it.  But I've also have always ridden 2strokes.  This is my first 4 stroke and I'm feeling very comfortable on it.

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Ya the bike can also add into the equation then IMO it really comes down to throttle/clutch control for the terrain.

I only ride fast flowy/slow technical single track in the BC on a CRF250R. I struggled with this bike in the slow/technical until I put on a flywheel weight which IMO was the best $200 I've spent on my bike and I can now lug my MX bike low in slow in 1/2/3 gear but it still loves to go fast.

Personally I love new tires and again only recently start to understand how good a new FRONT feels.

Regardless of what anyone tells you, you really need to buy different tires and play with PSI's to find out how they work for you.

I go through about 2/3 sets of tires a year. Last year I started in the spring on older Maxxis Desert IT's front/rear. Then before the summer I put on Michelin StarCross5 HARD's for dry/rocky summer conditions and rode them till November (both of these tires can take LOW PSI and are extremely durable) I then put on old Michelin SX's studded tires for the winter and now that snow has gone, just put on a Shinko 546 front and a 505 rear for the spring. I've only had one ride on the 505 in wet,slippery/rooty slow single track and some faster drier dirt roads and at about 7 PSI this hooked up like crazy. Once I really get into the slow/technical snotty single track, I'll drop it slowly in PSI as needed and might go down to 2.

To many tires and not enough $$$$ or time :)

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I &%$#@!ing LOVE Shinkos!  I've actually been eyeballing that 505 and thinking of doing a street conversion for commuting and hooligans.  But then throwing on knobbies for the track.  I have Mich Starcross 5 mediums at work.  The bike has MX 51s now, but have I'm guessing 15-20 hours on.

 

So that 505 hooks the trail pretty good?  How does it do on the street?

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12-15 depending on track and conditions, square edged bumps,jumps.  plus I'm 220. Dunlap tires. 752,756,mx51,mx52

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Its on my CFR250R and IMO its a super soft gummy tire and I would not ride it on the pavement cus I' sure it would wear quick.

I got to the top of a super steep hill where I had to stop just before the top cus there was a technical turn to a super steep descent on the other side. The 505 hooked up so good I almost flipped the bike over backwards :)

Then during the summer, lots of my local trails are loamy and lots of guys ride the StarCross 5 mediums

 

Edited by filterx
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Nice!  I've actually have had 2 sets of 705s on my 1958 Indian cafe racer and 2001 BMW GS650F.  Love them so much that every time a customer is wanting to upgrade to a mostly street trail capable tire I generally sell them these.  I can usually get a complete set installed for for about $250.  I'll see them a few weeks later and they always comment how much they love them.

 

But yeah, I'm going to look into those 505s tomorrow.  Sounds like a great tire for Rampart Range.

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41 minutes ago, High On Octane said:

Nice!  I've actually have had 2 sets of 705s on my 1958 Indian cafe racer and 2001 BMW GS650F.  Love them so much that every time a customer is wanting to upgrade to a mostly street trail capable tire I generally sell them these.  I can usually get a complete set installed for for about $250.  I'll see them a few weeks later and they always comment how much they love them.

 

But yeah, I'm going to look into those 505s tomorrow.  Sounds like a great tire for Rampart Range.

I would love to ride CO, Utah and Idaho at some point :)

Otherwise there is a topic on the on the 505 if your are interested.

 

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12psi front 11psi rear, down to 9 psi front & 8 psi rear in slippery wet bog holes. I've never had a flat tyre period, & ride with confidence every time... (i generally always use thick tubes) This with Dunlops Geomax & Pirelli tyres. 

 

The bike shop told me Mitchelin require higher pressure than most tyres to get better traction 14-15 psi otherwise i'd never run 14-15 psi despite my manual sating that figure.

Also depends on the tyre, bike, track conditions etc

You will generally see the 11-13psi for dry conditions & 7-9psi in the country of soft soil & clay based tracks New Zealand, for very wet conditions depending on so many other ideas & preferences.

Edited by surfez

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I run kenda sticky tires front and back and get the best traction with 8 in the rear and 10 in the front but due to very rocky terrain I have to run 15 front and 13 rear to avoid pinch flats. I'm 125 lbs hope this helps.

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