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CRF250X/450X Valve Adjustment

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I'm looking to pay someone in the Denver metro area to teach me how to adjust the valves on my Honda CRF250X. I'm tired of taking the bike to the dealer every few weeks and paying to get it done. If you know what you're doing with Honda 4-strokes and want to make $300 to teach me how to do this, let me know. Or if you know someone with Honda 4-stroke experience who wants to earn some $, let me know. The YouTube videos make it look easy, but I don't feel comfortable taking the engine apart to that extent, yet.

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You are bringing it in every few weeks to check and adjust valves?? Seriously how often have you done this and what adjustments did they need to make? What dealer?

checking them can't be that hard either. I do on my yz250f, surely they can't be too different on yours principle wise. What year do you have?

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It's a 2012 CRF250X. I was told (by the salesman) when I bought the bike at Sun that I should check/adjust the valves every 20 hours or so. I didn't think it would be so bad, but it's true. Honda 4-stokes are notoriously high maintenance when it comes to the valves. The bike becomes difficult (or VERY difficult) to start after about 25 hours and a fresh valve adjustment clears it up. When we're near Moab riding a lot, this becomes a pain in the a-s. The dealer (Sun) always needs to re-shim because the valves get "out of spec".

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I just have the general guide that comes with the bike. It doesn't go into any detail on valve work. I need to buy a more detailed service manual and ask the dealer for advice on upgrading the valves. I've been checking out other advice and I think I may also need to soak the filter with more lube between changes, even if it drips a lot. Will try to keep the filter "wet" and change it after every ride (rather than every other ride).

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6 hours ago, Fitz2017 said:

It's a 2012 CRF250X. I was told (by the salesman) when I bought the bike at Sun that I should check/adjust the valves every 20 hours or so. I didn't think it would be so bad, but it's true. Honda 4-stokes are notoriously high maintenance when it comes to the valves. The bike becomes difficult (or VERY difficult) to start after about 25 hours and a fresh valve adjustment clears it up. When we're near Moab riding a lot, this becomes a pain in the a-s. The dealer (Sun) always needs to re-shim because the valves get "out of spec".

It sounds like youve gotten some bad advice from someone who either doesnt know what he's talking about or sees a way to take advantage someone. Unless there is a lot of hours on that bike or a problem it would be a little unusual for the valves to need adjusting every twenty hours. If you have some mechanical experience and the tools needed it only takes about a 20-30 minutes to check the valves, if an adjustment is needed add another 20-30 minutes. There are probably more guys who dont ever check their valves than you would guess, some just keep running the engine until a problem shows up and then check the valves. If the valves are actually going out of adjustment you probably need to get them replaced and most would recommend using a stainless steel intake valve kit to get longer life from them.

How many times have you had to have the valves checked/adjusted?

How much use or how many hours are on the bike?

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adjust valves using principles shown here. However, typically after second or third adjustment it's time for a new head. Buy one with stainless steel valves already installed and the seats cut to match the new valves. This will make it last longer and have longer valve adjustment intervals too. Definitely service air filter after each dusty ride. 

 

Here's the link for a new head with SS valves and heavy duty springs already installed. 

http://ape-store.com/shopsite/page23.html

Likely cheaper if you send them your core. 

Edited by shrubitup
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A stock 250X motor, once it starts needed shimming, is in need of replacement intake valves, soon. Sooner than later.

The Titanium valve coatings break down, then the hard seats cause the sealing surfaces to 'mushroom', and the valve stops sealing and starts to get very hot, then brittle.

You should go a maximum of (3) shimmings before having the head reworked.

If you are riding HARD and reving out HIGH, then I can see where this might be an issue. 

If you are not, then you should not need to do the shimming at all, until it gets hard to start.....which can also be fuel screw and dirty carb related...

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Wow! Thanks for all the info! I've taken the bike in four times for valve check (and if necessary, adjustment). According to the bill$ I've paid, they've needed adjustment three times. I'm starting to wonder if I've been charged for adjustment when all they did was check them and find no issues. The starting issues have cleared up after the valve work, so I'm still a bit confused about what's actually going on. I got used to my old maintenance-free 2-stroke which is no more. I've put 115 hours on this "new" bike over three years. We ride fairly technical mountain trails and single track and I often keep it pinned on the dirt road transitions between interesting trails. I need to pay more attention to the filter for starters (more oil, keep spare oiled filters ready, change every ride) and I'm gunna start at least checking the valves on my own. Maybe after that and watching some videos, I'll stop being such a P and do the adjustment myself when necessary. Might need to try the stainless steel valves if I consistently discover issues with my own checks. Thanks again!

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