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Lectron and Smart carburators: Are they worth it?

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I have a 2003 Kawasaki KX 250 2 stroke and I find it a pain to jet a carburator. I hear smart carburetors and Lectron carburators you barely have to tune and they adjust to temperature changes, weather, and so on. I've heard there even as good or as close to fuel injection for 2 strokes. Well I am recovering from my injuries, I am thinking about buying one of these for my dirt bike but I want to know if anyone has had any experience with them. Are they worth it? What are the pros and cons? 

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No such thing as a 'magic carb'. Lectrons and SMART (both 'created' by the same guy) carbs are less sensitive to jetting accuracy though for some, a PITA to install.

If stock jetting is not working on your bike, the most common cause for that is a mechanical issue, from a damaged carb, bad reeds, power valve, weak stator,  carboned up ports, pipe, bad crank seals or bearings. The list goes on.

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I lean towards the same opinion as William. Could be something else effecting how the bike runs.

A guy on here had an extensive build thread of his 01 KX250. He went with a lectron and after dumping money into it, he finally switched back to the stock carb. Our stock carbs are very good and I find they are easy to jet.

Really ones you get it jetted you shouldn't have to mess with it much unless you are changing elevation drastically.

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I would also pass on the aftermarket carb.  The stock PWK works great.  Stock jetting is a few adjustments away from perfect and I set it up a little rich on the main so it will run year round without adjustment.

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My KX 250 isn't running lean. I just find it a pain to have to jet it for Michigan's crazy weather. Temperatures range from 90 degrees ferenheight to 0 degrees ferenheight. 

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I wouldn't recommend riding below about 30 degrees.  All that would be required to adjust for that kind of variation would be a main jet, needle clip adjustment and air screw adjustment.  No big deal.

I ride out here in NM year round, 30-100+ degrees.  My 03 didn't require rejetting, though it ran a little rich in the summer months.  My 05 is a little more sensitive to temperature but I still haven't had to adjust jetting.  It just feels leaner and tends to bog a little bit in the midrange when its real cold out.

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The Lectron is less sensitive but does still need minor tweaking for "perfect " jetting. It is easier to tune  for many because it only has 2 adjustments.  

 

 The issue  I found is limited needles and no flow rate comparisons by lectron. I wanted something a little different than normal and couldn't get help. They are adding more it seems. 

 

 On my 250s I wasn't impressed for the $ involved. On my 125 it was better than  My keihen.  

  For me "perfect" jetting from a keihen may require different needles and even slides. Many aren't willing to work at it that hard. 

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@turbo dan

why no riding below 30? Or do you just mean no riding without jet swapping below 30?

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My Lectron did take some dialing in, but now I'm starting to really like it on my 200. It smoothed out the transition when it hits the pipe, which is invaluable for the woods riding that I do. And after a 2 hr hard woods ride, I had no more than a film of oil around the exhaust opening.

When I really noticed the advantage was last weekend. My buddy has a 2017 KTM 300 XC-W, and we rode Friday night in the cooler temps. Both our bikes performed great. But Saturday afternoon, it got pretty hot and muggy. His was audibly different, breaking up at certain throttle positions and spooging a good bit out the exhaust. Mine rode identical to the night before, with no more spooge than in the cooler temps.

Was it worth it? That's subjective. To me it was, because I don't have an easy time "reading" the bike. And we get some crazy temp swings here too. A couple weeks ago, I woke up to 29°, but the afternoon finished at a nice high 60's. And I had an AFR meter on my street bike, so I've seen how those temps affect jetting. It's a lot more than people realize.

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