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I watch videos online and sometimes try to mimic them in an attempt to learn. But sometimes I am not ready for specific stunts yet. It would be great if this forum could name all the different moves that need be learned in a progressive list. From the most basic to hardest. Then myself and others could use it as a checklist and move on from one to the other after it has been mastered. For this thread, I would like to get input for the naming. After they are compiled, if we get participation, Myself or another can start a thread asking about "skill level" to categorize these named moves.  Then, myself or another could start a thread about specifics to that particular move. LOL, this will get me anxious about getting outside and learning

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I was trying to name moves last night. I then realized that much of it does not have official names. 

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32 minutes ago, 1gr8bldr said:

I was trying to name moves last night. I then realized that much of it does not have official names. 

That's true, and different locale's have their own names for moves. I subscribe to the Ryan Young naming convention. I think his DVD is aleady organized by beginner, intermediate, advanced.

 

My approach has been, learn the moves that are necessary for the type of riding you want to do, or the obstacle you have trouble with. That led me to work on what Ryan calls the jap zap. But it turns out I'm also learning balance, front wheel placement, traction, all in the process. Trials is so fun that now Im starting to practice other stuff like stoppies, wheel hops, floaters..

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6 hours ago, jacob429 said:

That's true, and different locale's have their own names for moves. I subscribe to the Ryan Young naming convention. I think his DVD is aleady organized by beginner, intermediate, advanced.

 

My approach has been, learn the moves that are necessary for the type of riding you want to do, or the obstacle you have trouble with. That led me to work on what Ryan calls the jap zap. But it turns out I'm also learning balance, front wheel placement, traction, all in the process. Trials is so fun that now Im starting to practice other stuff like stoppies, wheel hops, floaters..

Should I get the Ryan young videos? I have seen several of his you tube vids. Are there more than whats already on youtube? As far as progressive, I was thinking about trying floater turns.... when I realized holding pressure, and wheelies should come first (:

I am limited for a few days. I about cut the end off of my clutch finger. If it had not been for the bone stopping it, it would have cut it off clean. So, I can't play pretend trials rider for a few days. At least until the stitches are ready to come out

Edited by 1gr8bldr

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13 minutes ago, 1gr8bldr said:

Should I get the Ryan young videos? I have seen several of his you tube vids. Are there more than whats already on youtube? As far as progressive, I was thinking about trying floater turns.... when I realized holding pressure, and wheelies should come first (:

I am limited for a few days. I about cut the end off of my clutch finger. If it had not been for the bone stopping it, it would have cut it off clean. So, I can't play pretend trials rider for a few days. At least until the stitches are ready to come out

There are a few clips that I never saw on youtube. Also it'll be better quality, and will group by difficulty level (I think, can't remember) in the DVD menu.

 

I expected floater turns to be much more scary than they actually were. Pretty fun to do, even if you don't get it right, it's easy enough to dab your foot if needed, at least on the trials bike. I wouldn't say you need to learn holding pressure, but for sure practice wheelies and covering the rear brake if you want to ride out a floater at the balance point. I'm not there yet with my floaters and I still need more wheelie practice, but it's still fun to bounce that front wheel off a tree and at least do a 90-degree turn.

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5 hours ago, jacob429 said:

There are a few clips that I never saw on youtube. Also it'll be better quality, and will group by difficulty level (I think, can't remember) in the DVD menu.

 

I expected floater turns to be much more scary than they actually were. Pretty fun to do, even if you don't get it right, it's easy enough to dab your foot if needed, at least on the trials bike. I wouldn't say you need to learn holding pressure, but for sure practice wheelies and covering the rear brake if you want to ride out a floater at the balance point. I'm not there yet with my floaters and I still need more wheelie practice, but it's still fun to bounce that front wheel off a tree and at least do a 90-degree turn.

My bike has 15 inches ground clearance, harder to get that foot down. My other bike I would try anything because I was to big for it, but that gave tons of confidence. LOL, been out riding, now my middle finger is my clutch finger. 

Edited by 1gr8bldr

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13 hours ago, 1gr8bldr said:

My bike has 15 inches ground clearance, harder to get that foot down. My other bike I would try anything because I was to big for it, but that gave tons of confidence. LOL, been out riding, now my middle finger is my clutch finger. 

The trials bike has given me loads more confidence. Much more room for error with the low seat height and weight. Hope I have the guts to try a floater turn on the enduro bike :)

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The list would be way long and need a lot to describe each one. 

After 17 years in trials, teaching my kids to ride and seeing a bunch of new guys come and go my best advice is learn the solid basics before worrying about the tricks. I see a lot of guys who learn how to hop before they learn how to properly turn a bike. Then it all falls apart when they need it in real world applications I'm a section. 

With my kids I found it best to just make sections progressively harder and harder and they learn the techniques because it's the only way they can get through the sections. 

I'm not saying don't practice that stuff individually, just don't make it your main focus. 

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44 minutes ago, ccullins said:

The list would be way long and need a lot to describe each one. 

After 17 years in trials, teaching my kids to ride and seeing a bunch of new guys come and go my best advice is learn the solid basics before worrying about the tricks. I see a lot of guys who learn how to hop before they learn how to properly turn a bike. Then it all falls apart when they need it in real world applications I'm a section. 

With my kids I found it best to just make sections progressively harder and harder and they learn the techniques because it's the only way they can get through the sections. 

I'm not saying don't practice that stuff individually, just don't make it your main focus. 

My main focus has been practicing things individually. I do plan to rope off sections in my yard to force me to start stringing the different techniques together and start to think about strategy once I get some of the techniques down.

I did this on a very small scale by setting down 3 logs positioned such that you need to keep the bike turning and clear the logs at an angle to set up for the next. There is ample room, almost 2 bike lengths between them, but really increased the difficulty over just doing one obstacle by itself with easy approaches. 

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3 hours ago, ccullins said:

The list would be way long and need a lot to describe each one. 

 

You are right on. I made a list, bear in mind that I don't ride real trials events, I only know what I see on the net. My list had 44 moves, and my lingo for naming them was far from text book. 

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5 hours ago, 1gr8bldr said:

You are right on. I made a list, bear in mind that I don't ride real trials events, I only know what I see on the net. My list had 44 moves, and my lingo for naming them was far from text book. 

That's great! Mind sharing your list? 44 items is a lot!

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Btw, the Ryan young dvd has maybe 20ish techiques. I'll try to name them off the top of my head

Basics

Balance, turning, off camber turns, wheelies, braking, roll-ups

Intermediate

Double blip, nose wheelies, front wheel hops, rear wheel hops, holding pressure, double blip, uphills, hill descents, bunny hops

Advanced

Floater turns, flip turns, japzap, splats, (japzap and splats may have been under intermediate), rear wheel hops

 

I'm sure im forgetting some. Some techniques are combined into one move, like the zap could combine wheelies, balance, covering rear brake, and holding pressure all in one depending on situation.

 

He also has one or two parts on section strate where he explains how he applies the techniques in a real section which is great.

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2 hours ago, jacob429 said:

That's great! Mind sharing your list? 44 items is a lot!

LOL, you might not understand my terminology. I will see if I can make it more presentable.

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I guess I'm on the slow track. I see Jacob doing moves I can't do yet...like balancing at a complete stop. There are so many names for different moves/techniques, seems like everyone has their own names for them. I have watched many of the RY videos and some of them are poorly made...shots too distant or indistinct, audio garbled from wind noise, ect. 44 move names is an awful lot to remember. I'm going to go the easy route. Since I learn tons from Jacob's vids, I'm going to go by whatever he calls them. If he calls wheelies puppy crap, so will I.:thumbsup:.

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On 5/3/2017 at 8:36 PM, jacob429 said:

That's great! Mind sharing your list? 44 items is a lot!

Sorry, to lazy to type it. Kept thinking I would but... better than nothing, and LOL, was just scribble, never meant to be read. I usually write a little better than that

20170507_120742.jpg

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 There must be at least 50 types of turns, master all of them and you're on your way.

Edited by motovita

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Sorry, not a trials rider.....but I gotta ask....

why is it important to name a technique ? I mean if I was learning and the instructor said "you need to zap zap double tap ping dong to the left " it would not help me at all...

If the instructor said "get the rear compressed the when you move forward supply some rear torque and just kiss the front wheel on that edge" now I can understand stuff like that...

So again, what's all the naming stuff for ?

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4 hours ago, daled said:

Sorry, not a trials rider.....but I gotta ask....

why is it important to name a technique ? I mean if I was learning and the instructor said "you need to zap zap double tap ping dong to the left " it would not help me at all...

If the instructor said "get the rear compressed the when you move forward supply some rear torque and just kiss the front wheel on that edge" now I can understand stuff like that...

So again, what's all the naming stuff for ?

So, when I go out to practice this evening, I can look at my list, looking for the easiest on the list to learn. 

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On 5/17/2017 at 11:14 AM, daled said:

Sorry, not a trials rider.....but I gotta ask....

why is it important to name a technique ? I mean if I was learning and the instructor said "you need to zap zap double tap ping dong to the left " it would not help me at all...

If the instructor said "get the rear compressed the when you move forward supply some rear torque and just kiss the front wheel on that edge" now I can understand stuff like that...

So again, what's all the naming stuff for ?

It's a shorthand for what you typed in your second example. The way you explained how to carry out a move, an instructor only has to say all that once then abbreviate it by calling it a ping dolly wong and you'll know what he's talking about. 

 

I'm sure you also use names for moves, like wheelies or stoppies. You wouldn't say "put your weight back and use the clutch and throttle to lift the front wheel" every time, so you call it a wheelie. I know people who have never heard of a nose wheelie or stoppie, so I only have to use the long explanation once and they know what I'm talking about after that. They obviously aren't riders though lol

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