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Help with stripped oil filter bolt!!

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Hello guys, the bottom bolt hole on my oil filter cover is stripped on my 09yz 450. I believe it has an oil passage incorporated in the hole? I'm looking for some advice on what I should do about it. It is stripped to the point of it will just get right at finger tight or a little less, and every time I run it in and out I get 2-3 threads with metal stuck in the bolt. The bolt is not stripped, it looks perfect. Any help would be greatly appreciated 

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Ok, upon a search I found that I can do a time sert but I was unsure from the posts I found if the case side needs removed in order to do this?

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Yes. Remove case. Are you doing this yourself? If so. Buy brand new bits. And I'd use a drill press if I could. Then your revolutions have consistency and even pressure. There's not much room for mistakes. Drill using oil. Old oil. Just keep dipping your bit. This needs to be straight. Thats why a press is the choice.
If you're not doing it yourself. Have it filled with a tig welder, redrilled and rethreaded to m6. I bet it'd cost the same as a sert.
Was there a copper washer on this bolt. Crush washers crush. Use them once, then anneal them or put on a brand new one everytime. This is why it stripped. And torque specs. If a bolt, that has a copper washer is 10ft lbs torque, then the first 10ft lb tightening has crushed the crush washer. So the next time you use it, it's smaller. The more you crush it, the smaller it gets. You wont see it. But you're having to tighten 1/8 turn more each time until it starts pulling threads up. Aluminum threads sticking to the bolts steel threads. This is why you dip steel bolts in oil before install. Not grease. Oil. Oil doesn't affect torque specs. So; clean females, new crush washer, clean/oiled male threads, proper torque specs.
Blammo
Take your cover off or, to me, same as putting bb's into your oil

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The case does not need to be removed, although that would be the best procedure.  The oil passage that intersects that threaded hole is supposed to function as a drain.  It barely works for that purpose, it's unnecessary, and is actually the cause of the problem in the first place. Read these two threads:

https://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/494719-screwed-the-thread-right-out-come-on-everyone-does-it-at-some-stage/

https://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/548754-preventing-thread-damage-to-the-lower-filter-cover-bolt/

 

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The case does not need to be removed, although that would be the best procedure.  The oil passage that intersects that threaded hole is supposed to function as a drain.  It barely works for that purpose, it's unnecessary, and is actually the cause of the problem in the first place. Read these two threads:
https://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/494719-screwed-the-thread-right-out-come-on-everyone-does-it-at-some-stage/
https://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/548754-preventing-thread-damage-to-the-lower-filter-cover-bolt/
 

What do you think about the suggestion of having it tig welded shut and tapping a new hole instead of the time sert? I imagine it would be cheaper since the time sert kits I've found are $70+ and I kinda see it being a better fix but you would probably know more than me

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Buying a new case would be cheaper than TIG'ing it shut and re-machining it.  There's nothing at all wrong with a TimeSert insofar as the quality of the repair, and even a simple Heli-Coil works "OK" if done right.  When using either insert, the insert has to be long enough to extend past the hole that leads from the bolt threads to the filter well, or a loss of oil pressure will result.  It needs to reach the full installed length of the threads on the bolt.

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Not if you know somebody and machine it yourself...but best left to professionals.
Just what I'd do rather that sert and I dont eff with coils. Timesert all day before that. But that's what I know.
But Id feel safe tig blasting a tic tac and using the bolts length to measure the depth and 5mm drill press said length, and m6 tap it. Using ATF in an eye dropper the whole time. Badabing. But I do things different. Also I have tools, I don't have part money. Two motors on the table right now! So ask your friends about tig welding. Cause this is the easiest a job like this will get.
But grey sure speaks the truth. All that is a big deal to accrue if you don't do this often. Im not a pro. I just buy old ish! I bet cases are cheaper, and more reliable than anything repairs.
Now, use torque specs for sure. And if there's copper washers, anneal them, or new everytime.

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A new case is $200.

The TimeSert is definitely better than a HeliCoil on two significant counts:

  • The top of the repaired hole will be square with the hole (important for drain plug applications)
  • It has far less tendency to dislodge with repeated removal/replacement of the bolt

Don't forget that if the case gets welded, you will need to verify the flatness of the oil filter cover sealing surface.  It holds full system oil pressure.

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I found a case guaranteed to have no stripped holes or my money back on eBay for $45 free shipping. Now I know it could strip at any time in the near future but that's an option.Think I'll ask a guy in town how much it'd be to weld it and if it's much more than that I'll try that eBay case. It does leak a little oil with the engine running so I drilled a few holes in the head of the bolt and safety wired it to keep it from falling out and I threw some silicone over the seepage after a good cleaning hoping to make a harescramble in the morning but if that hold filter compartment holds full oil pressure I doubt it'll stop the leak and not real sure I wanna chance running it low on oil pressure and losing my silicone halfway thru the race along with half my oil...

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Sounds good! $45!
But a friend won't want you to spend that money when that's basically a sneeze with a welder to repair. Drilling/tapping is harder to me. Takes more work to roll the welder over and plug it in. Youd be surprised how connected you are, you just never needed this so you didn't explore. Ask your friends. I dont know how commercially connected you are, but this is so easy.
Just know the exact bolt length to make a proper hole.
But to tell you the truth. I could do this half asleep, but I'd MUCH rather not do that work and just go buy a new one. I just dont have money like that. Thats why I figure out the backwoods way to fix things so I can spend that money on gas and go ride. Instead of fix the bike faster/easier, but not be able to take it out to ride.
Peace of mind is also something you're paying for.
Id feel a whole lot safer on a factory made part. Than something I created.

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Skipped the race since I went out and fired it up and it was still dumping oil around the silicone like I thought it would. Tore it apart and got the case off and ready to work on it gonna call the guy I know at a machine shop in town (small town). So not a lot of resources around me, bigger cities about an hour away but since I don't venture there much I don't have a lot of connections lol. I'm the same way, I try to fix whatever I can but as I get older and busier it makes it hard . I can weld and drill and tap but don't have a tig or any experience with one so I'll see what kinda $ he'll do it for I spose, should just order that used case

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What was the part # for that bolt gray? I saw it somewhere in my search but can't find it now

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