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How much is a re-valve typically? And who should I use?

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Thinking about getting my 2001 yz125 re-valved, I do 80% trail ridding on dry rocky hard pack (see pics) and 20% track (beginner lvl). How much dose a re-valve usually run? Is it really worth the money especially on such a inexpensive bike? if so who should I use? I'm 150lbs 5'11 live in norther California.  

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Do you have specific issues you are trying to address??  Have you "freshened" up your suspension recently?  New fluids, bushings, etc....  Before sending it off for a re-valve I would make sure it is all in good working condition and that you have a good idea of what you would like it to do differently.

Forks are pretty easy to re-valve yourself, and there are plenty of good guys on the suspension forum that can help you figure out what to do.  I've never done my shocks myself, because I figure I've got to take it somewhere for a nitrogen charge anyway.

Weight wise you seem like you should be right in the target range of the stock suspension setup on the YZ125.  Probably just needs a few minor tweaks or two.

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Ya that's what I figured at my weight. The bike just seems to bounce off everything compared to my ktm300 that seems to absorb the bumps/rocks, but that might be due to its weight and the fact it was made for it. Changing the springs probably wouldn't help much right? seeing how I'm sure they built this bike for riders at 150lbs also can fluid weight help?

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2 hours ago, nopo530 said:

Ya that's what I figured at my weight. The bike just seems to bounce off everything compared to my ktm300 that seems to absorb the bumps/rocks, but that might be due to its weight and the fact it was made for it. Changing the springs probably wouldn't help much right? seeing how I'm sure they built this bike for riders at 150lbs also can fluid weight help?

Your springs are probably right for your weight. A service would help, since you probably have very worn components. 

In all actuality, a revalve is what you really need to get. Making adjustments in the volume of oil (changing the air chamber) in the forks can make a difference. But motocross bikes are generally valved stiffer. 

Getting your suspension right for your riding conditions is some of the best money you will spend. Find someone locally if you can, with recommendations from other riders. 

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Factory Connection will likely cost 8-1200 depending on what they do. Play with oil level and clickers to get a grip on what the issues are and you can probably get some better advice.

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Factory Connection will likely cost 8-1200 depending on what they do. Play with oil level and clickers to get a grip on what the issues are and you can probably get some better advice.

Thank you for this info.

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10 hours ago, nopo530 said:

Anyone know how much factory connection is after it's said and done? I seen they had a place in cal.

I wouldn't go to Factory Connection. They had done my YZ250 sometime in the past and when I pulled the fork legs down to do the RT valving, I found one compression stack had two more shims than the other. I didn't check shim thicknesses, but they may well have been off too. Somebody paid upwards of $1k for what was pretty much an amateur botch job. 

Myself, I used good 'ol Race Tech Gold Valves with the RT recommended shim stack configurations in both fork and shock. $169 each end for the Gold Valve kits, few bottles of 5w oil, $80 for a decent metric micrometer, already had fork seal driver and regular tools, local shop recharged my shock for free, got butter smooth woods suspension for around $500. And I know it's done right. :thumbsup:

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Honestly I wouldn't mine spending $500-600 to have someone do it,I don't want to. I just couldn't pay $1000-1200, hell the bike only cost me $700 and it isn't even my main bike.

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I don't know what the prices are over on the west coast, but around here, you can get a good revalve (if you don't have any serious issues, like broken parts, dings in the tubes etc...) for $400-$600. Those same shops also have options that could run several hundred more. Plus if you need springs (which you probably don't) you have to account for that. 

 

But like @OLHILLBILLY said, you could do the forks (if you are good with tools, aren't easily distracted, and aren't ham-fisted) . I've revalved OC forks many times. Find a good shim stack, then adjust the air chamber, get the sag set and then it's just a matter of getting the compression and rebound set and you are good. Then you just have to get the shock revalved.

 

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I don't know what the prices are over on the west coast, but around here, you can get a good revalve (if you don't have any serious issues, like broken parts, dings in the tubes etc...) for $400-$600. Those same shops also have options that could run several hundred more. Plus if you need springs (which you probably don't) you have to account for that. 
 
But like [mention=86407]OLHILLBILLY[/mention] said, you could do the forks (if you are good with tools, aren't easily distracted, and aren't ham-fisted) . I've revalved OC forks many times. Find a good shim stack, then adjust the air chamber, get the sag set and then it's just a matter of getting the compression and rebound set and you are good. Then you just have to get the shock revalved.
 


Shock is really no different than the fork. Valve and shim stacks, just everything is a bit bigger diameter. I used RT's recommended stacks and it's as plush as the fork.
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Just now, OLHILLBILLY said:

 


Shock is really no different than the fork. Valve and shim stacks, just everything is a bit bigger diameter. I used RT's recommended stacks and it's as plush as the fork.

 

True, but a lot of people shy away from shocks due to the nitrogen charge. But you are right. The first time I did my KTM forks, a very good suspension person gave me the shim stack specs, and I ordered the shims from RT. Disassembled, cleaned, replaced/reordered shims, assembled, plush. The last person I sent them to got them better, but it cost me. But it wasn't a bad deal.

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A revalve will make a huge difference for that type of terrain.  I have used over the years both Factory Connection and local tuners over the years, and both can give excellent results.  The main difference is that local tuners are typically less expensive, and you can also avoid shipping, which will save you about $100.

I would recommend you attend a local race event and find out who the preferred tuners are for your area.  Just find out who the local guys are using. 

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I don't think we have a local guy around me so I would be shipping parts either way. I live in Redding ca

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On ‎5‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 8:34 PM, nopo530 said:

Anyone know how much factory connection is after it's said and done? I seen they had a place in cal.

My FC revalve front and rear was over $1000 and that's without springs.  Works great but I ride MX and it probably wouldn't be worth it for you.  I'd get new bushings, seals, oil and make sure the springs are correct for your weight and call it a day.  Should cost about $100--$200 if you do it yourself and buy the correct tools.  It'd be about $3-400 at a shop for that. 

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