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Confused about hr monitors

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I've been looking at these for a few months now and I've narrowed it down to a couple options. I'm still not sure if I want a wrist watch or a chest monitor.

A wrist watch will give me gps, auto lap times, I can wear it more, but it is more expensive and the hr monitoring is not as accurate at a chest strap. My phone can do all the gps stuff (lap times too) but probably slightly less accurate. If I get a wrist based one it would be the garmin vivoactive hr which I would buy used for $100-140. It does seem like it would be much easier to break one of those though. I also looked at the other more sports specialized watches which would be more durable but they are more expensive and are mostly made for running and swimming so I wouldn't benefit too much.

Chest straps are a lot cheaper and more accurate. Only thing I'd really be losing is I can't wear it that much which I don't really care I probably wouldn't wear a wrist watch that much anyway but you never know. I pretty much narrowed this down to a wahoo tickr because it has ant+ and Bluetooth. I only want ant+ because the garmin watches only connect to sensors using ant+ and I want to have that possibility in case I get one in the future. Another negative is im not sure if it would create a safety issue wearing it under my chest protector making a pressure point if I would fall. I emailed someone from the racer x virtual trainer site and he said he never heard of anyone getting hurt from this and I could turn it around to my back (can I turn it to my side?) if I was worried. The wahoo tickr can be bought new for under $50 and used a lot cheaper than that.

So yeah... I'm leaning towards the chest strap but just wondering everyone's opinions.

 

Thanks

Justin

 

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I wear a Wahoo chest strap HRM and linking it to my Garmin was almost effortless. I wear it when Mtb or road cycling. I use it to help me determine my level of output and workout intensity. I also use it to train in a specific zone and monitor my HR to assure that I don't over do it when climbing. I know at what HR I start to burn out (172) and try hard to stay in the mid 160's to make sure my endurance and recovery does not suffer.

A side note, regardless of what my HRM says about me, never compare your HR to that of others sharing in the ride. An interesting tidbit was that I just had a full cardiologist work up last month and showed him my HRM info. He used that to assure me that my heart was strong, valves holding, volume excellent and no muscle issues. That was good news for me because heart disease runs in my family but apparently skipped over me. By 58, most of the males in my family had minor heart attacks already, so I have been heart health conscience for about 30 years now. 

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I wear a Wahoo chest strap HRM and linking it to my Garmin was almost effortless. I wear it when Mtb or road cycling. I use it to help me determine my level of output and workout intensity. I also use it to train in a specific zone and monitor my HR to assure that I don't over do it when climbing. I know at what HR I start to burn out (172) and try hard to stay in the mid 160's to make sure my endurance and recovery does not suffer.
A side note, regardless of what my HRM says about me, never compare your HR to that of others sharing in the ride. An interesting tidbit was that I just had a full cardiologist work up last month and showed him my HRM info. He used that to assure me that my heart was strong, valves holding, volume excellent and no muscle issues. That was good news for me because heart disease runs in my family but apparently skipped over me. By 58, most of the males in my family had minor heart attacks already, so I have been heart health conscience for about 30 years now. 

Yeah I would eventually like to do that, that's pretty cool. That's great your dodging the heart issues.
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Use s cheap strap. I have a no frills polar strap that is essentially just s Bluetooth enabled sensor. I haven't  changed the batteries in years. 

 

The watches are junk that almost do it will enough, but require charging all the time, have crap good sensors, end stupid expensive. 

 

I record hr on my smartphone via my  favorite GPS mapping application (locus ) and the hr data is saved to the gpx track , right along with location/speed/altitude/cadence. I can also use a workout specific application to show me the hr in real time if I like, on the same device that is pumping the tunes. 

 

Watches are.... Cute trendy toys. 

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Ended up with the basic level wahoo tickr. Tried to bid on the tickr run and actually would of got it cheaper but I couldn't press the button in time... I'll let everyone know how it is

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By having a healthy lifestyle,everyone can reduce the risk of getting heart disease.

1.Eat fish high in omega-3s, such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring and trout.
2.A handful of healthy nuts such as almonds or walnuts will satisfy your hunger and help your heart.
3.Try blueberries, strawberries, cranberries or raspberries in cereal or yogurt.
4.Oatmeal
5.Dark beans,such as kidney or black beans, are high in fiber, B-vitamins, minerals and other good stuff.
6.A 4-ounce glass of red wine (up to two for men and one for women per day) can help improve good (HDL) cholesterol levels.
7.Try marinated tofu in a stir-fry with fresh veggies for a heart-healthy lunch or dinner.
8.veggies such as carrots, sweet potatoes, red peppers and acorn squash are packed with carotenoids, fiber and vitamins to help your heart.
9.spinach packs a punch! Use it in sandwiches and salads instead of lettuce.
10.Fruits such as oranges, cantaloupes and papaya are rich in beta-carotene, potassium, magnesium and fiber.
11.Tender, sweet asparagus is filled with mighty nutrients such as beta-carotene, folate and fiber, and only provide 25 calories per cup, or 5 calories per large spear.
12.Tomatoes – even sun-dried varieties in winter months – provide lycopene, vitamin C and alpha- and beta-carotene.
13.Dark chocolate is good for your heart health
14.Crisp, fresh broccoli florets dipped in hummus are a terrific heart-healthy snack with a whopping list of nutrients, including vitamins C and E, potassium, calcium and fiber.

Include these foods in your diet in a controlled way.Fore more on health,refer Top Cardiac hospital in Kerala.If your family members is having heart disease,then you have the chance of getting heart disease.Along with this diet ,do exercise,quit smoking and control weight.

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