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At what point is a bike retro, classic and then vintage?

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Hi all,

Just bought an older bike the other day and was posting my "old bike" project in a chat section, and some fellas made a point saying "that shock worked great, better than SHOCKS", emphasis on the plural, basically saying it isnt really that old of a machine.

This bike being an 88 CR125 is essentially a modern bike as we know them today with cartridge forks, link rear a powervalve and liquid cooling and removable sub frame. 

Is it just old? I know some people consider the 87 a classic (not really the 88), or at least something special. It certainly isnt vintage. But it is almost 30 years old.

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That's a classic 125? Lol big Vintage race at Unadilla says 89 -older 

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29 minutes ago, Motox367 said:

That's a classic 125? Lol big Vintage race at Unadilla says 89 -older 

Sorry, are you saying yes the bike is a classic, because the Vintage race says 1989 and older?

or

That's just an old modern, nothing to get excited about? But rules say 1989 and older "counts".

Edit: Either way I reckon it's pretty cool. Looks great, started up great after a carby clean and a new plug. Very loud tho. Need to seal and repack exhaust.

Sounded like firecrackers.

Edited by BushPig

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I figure it to be vintage but I don't really know lol or is it all of the above?  Cool bike tho :thumbsup: I restored a 87 cr250 one time but didn't like it 

Edited by Motox367
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Most "Vintage" MX clubs use the AHRMA rule book as a guideline to set up race classes.

At our races, Vintage class is typically 1971-1974 bikes. These are twin, short shock bikes before the era of angling the shocks to make them longer to get more travel. I see a lot of CZs, Bultacos, Husqvarnas, Maicos, and early Elsinores in this class.

 

The "Post-Vintage" bikes are grouped as GP classes. GP1 (1975-1977). You see a lot of RM250s and Maicos.

 

GP2 (1978-1981) are air-cooled bikes starting to having more travel in the front and rear. You see a lot of YZ250/400s with their monoshocks.

 

GP3 (1982-1983) have progressive link rear suspension and high travel forks. Mix of air- and water-cooled bikes. You see a lot of CR250/480Rs.

 

With GP4 (1984-88) bikes are water-cooled and you start seeing disc brakes. CR125/250Rs are pretty common along with RMs.

 

GP5 (1989-1999) bikes have a mix of modern suspension travel, rear discs and inverted forks.

 

Going back, Classic (1966-1970) bikes are typically Huskys, Ossa Stilletos, Montessas, side pipe CZs, Maico square barrels, Bultaco Pursangs, etc

 

The Dino class bikes are pre-1965 and are represented by the big single and twin four-strokes from Triumph, Norton, BSA,...

 

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4 hours ago, Sofiedog said:

Most "Vintage" MX clubs use the AHRMA rule book as a guideline to set up race classes.

At our races, Vintage class is typically 1971-1974 bikes. These are twin, short shock bikes before the era of angling the shocks to make them longer to get more travel. I see a lot of CZs, Bultacos, Husqvarnas, Maicos, and early Elsinores in this class.

 

The "Post-Vintage" bikes are grouped as GP classes. GP1 (1975-1977). You see a lot of RM250s and Maicos.

 

GP2 (1978-1981) are air-cooled bikes starting to having more travel in the front and rear. You see a lot of YZ250/400s with their monoshocks.

 

GP3 (1982-1983) have progressive link rear suspension and high travel forks. Mix of air- and water-cooled bikes. You see a lot of CR250/480Rs.

 

With GP4 (1984-88) bikes are water-cooled and you start seeing disc brakes. CR125/250Rs are pretty common along with RMs.

 

GP5 (1989-1999) bikes have a mix of modern suspension travel, rear discs and inverted forks.

 

Going back, Classic (1966-1970) bikes are typically Huskys, Ossa Stilletos, Montessas, side pipe CZs, Maico square barrels, Bultaco Pursangs, etc

 

The Dino class bikes are pre-1965 and are represented by the big single and twin four-strokes from Triumph, Norton, BSA,...

 

Thanks for the comprehensive write up.

I was really hoping to find a late 70s bike, but I could not pass up this CR. With a new plug and getting the crud out of the float bowl, a new pilot she fired right up.

I feel with a bit of work it'll be a solid machine that could mix it against the modern stuff if I do my bit.

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