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An odd question

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Had a guy ask me a question this past weekend and I didn't have an answer so I thought I would pose it to the forum. He was adjusting his fork clickers and asked "If I only go one click in on one fork leg would that be like a half a click total" and will the bike handle strange if he did it. I was scratching my head on that one. Thanks

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Pretty much, yes.  Different springs have been used in each fork leg to get an average rate between the two.  You just wouldn't want a huge difference between sides.  Even compression and rebound functions have been located in separate fork legs.  Once everything bolts tight top and bottom, it acts as a system.

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I took a clinic from off road hero Steve Hatch a while back. He did a whole segment on adjusting suspension. He said if want to feel a difference, make 5 click incriments then fine tune from there. One click on one side - never notice a difference.

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5 Clicks is a big change. Most people should adjust 2 clicks at a time if they are not that sensitive, or 1 click if you can feel the difference and keep testing till you find what you like best. I can feel the difference of 1 click on a sff fork with 1 click being only 1/8 of a turn, I feel a big difference with 2 clicks.

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cardoc has a point, really.  It depends on which bike and which suspension, but a lot of times it's hard to tell what effect you've had by moving something, especially when you first start playing with stuff.  Make one change at a time, so you can see the effect, make fairly big changes, 3-5 clicks, go back, then go the other way.  Compression and rebound do work in harmony with each other to a degree, too, so don't get too far afield on one without going to the other and moving it around. 

As far as the bike handling weird, it shouldn't.  There have been forks built in which one side did the compression damping and the other did rebound. Kawasaki recently used a fork in which one side had the only spring, and the other side did all the damping. If the structural components of the fork assembly are sturdy, it doesn't matter.

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