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That I keep stripping the nut to the upper shock bolt WHY????????? I have done 20-38 foot pounds with no problem as soon as I want forty pounds that's it it strips. No matter if I do it dry or even with a drop of oil nothing works just strips. Tried now two different torque wrenches and it still does it.

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Well that's three nuts and two bolts now that have stripped lol anybody want to take a gander why? Obviously the nut is softer than the bolt. Is there a way I can use a different nut that is made of tougher material?

 

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Your torque readings are thrown off because you're lubing the bolt/threads,

reduced thread friction means more clamping force is applied, making the fasteners stretch and fail.

 

In a past job I used to test and calibrate pneumatic tools,

heavy truck/bus wheels tools are usually calibrated to 450 lb/ft. and torqued with dry threads.

Customers that lubed the threads 'for good measure' often broke off wheel studs.

With reduced friction the actual applied force was measured to be in the 650 lb/ft range.

 

If you insist on using anti-seize on some fasteners (as I do on just about all chassis bolts)

reduce your applied torque values from the service manual specs. , in some cases, 30% less torque is a starting point.

 

Also, your torque wrench could be out of calibration.

 

 

Edited by mlatour
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Just snug it up by hand next time . Blue threadlock maybe even if makes you feel better.  Never tourqe one of them. Never stripped one either :rolleyes:

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5 hours ago, Hondaracer1318 said:

 

That I keep stripping the nut to the upper shock bolt WHY????????? I have done 20-38 foot pounds with no problem as soon as I want forty pounds that's it it strips. No matter if I do it dry or even with a drop of oil nothing works just strips. Tried now two different torque wrenches and it still does it.

 

What bike is it? I have a 2006 yz250 and a 2016 yz250x and this just happened to my top shock nut on the 16. Nothing happened to the bolt. I had a new nut (same kind of nut that has the built in washer and metal locking tabs)from a kit i bought at RMATV and had not problem at 40 ft lb. I have noticed that some of the nuts and bolts on the 16 seem lighter and weaker then my 06 and use the same torque specs.

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What bike is it? I have a 2006 yz250 and a 2016 yz250x and this just happened to my top shock nut on the 16. Nothing happened to the bolt. I had a new nut (same kind of nut that has the built in washer and metal locking tabs)from a kit i bought at RMATV and had not problem at 40 ft lb. I have noticed that some of the nuts and bolts on the 16 seem lighter and weaker then my 06 and use the same torque specs.

17 yz250x. What kit?

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Your torque readings are thrown off because you're lubing the bolt/threads,
reduced thread friction means more clamping force is applied, making the fasteners stretch and fail.
 
In a past job I used to test and calibrate pneumatic tools,
heavy truck/bus wheels tools are usually calibrated to 450 lb/ft. and torqued with dry threads.
Customers that lubed the threads 'for good measure' often broke off wheel studs.
With reduced friction the actual applied force was measured to be in the 650 lb/ft range.
 
If you insist on using anti-seize on some fasteners (as I do on just about all chassis bolts)
reduce your applied torque values from the service manual specs. , in some cases, 30% less torque is a starting point.
 
Also, your torque wrench could be out of calibration.
 
 

Tried it dry too.

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Are you putting washer there? I had the same issue you had and it was because I put the washer that was supposed to go on the bottom bolt up top (or vice versa can't recall) and when I torqued it, the bolt bolt stripped. Make sure you have your hardware where it's supposed to go

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Are you putting washer there? I had the same issue you had and it was because I put the washer that was supposed to go on the bottom bolt up top (or vice versa can't recall) and when I torqued it, the bolt bolt stripped. Make sure you have your hardware where it's supposed to go

Washer is up top. So yes all hardware is where it is supposed to go. Is it because the lower shock bolt is already tightened up and the upper is being stressed? Next time I'm going to just tighten it with a regular ratchet and not a torque wrench. I found a thread from 2008 and this individual had the same problem. And they asked about a nylon nut, has anyone tried that?

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8 hours ago, Hondaracer1318 said:

17 yz250x. What kit?

Looking at the part numbers the nut was changed in 2007. In 2006 it was P/N 95607-10200-00 and from 2007-2017 P/N 95602-10200-00. I think thay are putting cheaper nuts and bolts on these bikes to make them lighter. I broke 2 front axle nuts on my 2016 because they are aluminum so I but on the 2006 steel one.

 

As for the bolt kit here is a link https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/988/-/136154/Tusk-60-Piece-Metric-Motorcycle-Trail-Bolt-Kit?term=17-8664

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Never stripped a bolt on a YZ yet, and I mean ANY. Bought bikes with stripped Allen head on subframe lower hose protector on left fork, carb screws, and many oil drain.

Son stretched and broke a upper subframe on his once. Now he knows don't go ape, I think something is not right on method  

Same Craftsman torque wrench for years. $145.00 on sale for 75. 

Edited by Gary YZDOC
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Your torque readings are thrown off because you're lubing the bolt/threads,
 
 

I generally put anti-seize on most threads, so what percent of torque would you recommend I subtract for these small YZ fasteners?

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I worked in that business a good 10 years ago and have since forgotten the exact formulas, techniques etc. we used to compensate.

By memory we measured the required torque to remove a dry fastener, also measured the 'angle of torque'

but 30% to 40% less torque is a ballpark figure often mentioned in many technical articles. (engine building)

 

Honestly, the only fasteners I use a torque wrench on are engine, cylinder/head

which I assemble as recommended (either dry or lubed) in the service manual.

 

As mentioned, I anti-seize just about everything on my 2 bikes and the other 4 or so I service for friends.

All tightened by 'feel', I've neither stripped or found any loose bolts in the past 5 years.

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Went to the hardware store found a nylon nut. Used a original bolt I found a little loctite on the nut and boom torqued to 40 first try

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34 minutes ago, mlatour said:

I worked in that business a good 10 years ago and have since forgotten the exact formulas, techniques etc. we used to compensate.

By memory we measured the required torque to remove a dry fastener, also measured the 'angle of torque'

but 30% to 40% less torque is a ballpark figure often mentioned in many technical articles. (engine building)

 

Honestly, the only fasteners I use a torque wrench on are engine, cylinder/head

which I assemble as recommended (either dry or lubed) in the service manual.

 

As mentioned, I anti-seize just about everything on my 2 bikes and the other 4 or so I service for friends.

All tightened by 'feel', I've neither stripped or found any loose bolts in the past 5 years.

Same here.  All by feel from doing engines my whole life . I only tourqe head as well.  Choke up on 1/4 ratchet and good to go. I use cordless impact to take everything apart.  Try it next engine you do. :thumbsup:

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