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Bored at work I was looking at parts and I realized I didn't really know what difference it would make to get aftermarket triple clamps. Would someone be so kind to explain this for me? Also what is the purpose of getting offset clamps?

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Changing the offset moves your front tire closer or farther away from the motor which changes how quickly it will turn and how stable at speed it is. Applied is a major name brand for something like triple clamps.

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Changing the offset moves your front tire closer or farther away from the motor which changes how quickly it will turn and how stable at speed it is. Applied is a major name brand for something like triple clamps.

Thanks man! I did some research into this after I posted it (I know I should have done it first but I was lazy) and I found out that the ones I found are actually a pretty quality set of clamps. I also read a few articles and such about this topic and learned a lot about the physics and geometry that has been put into the design of the chassis of a motorcycle but one thing that I couldn't find any information on is what improvements someone would get (if any at all) from a set of aftermarket clamps if they set it up the exact same way as the factory ones other then most aftermarket clamps have much better vibration dampening.

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On 5/10/2017 at 8:53 PM, 2strokebrapp said:

Screenshot_2017-05-11-00-40-56.png
Also I found this set obviously on eBay, I have never heard of the brand so are they any good?

The biggest gain is that virtually all the aftermarket clamps are heavier.  They look cool.  I have some.  I even have some Applied clamps.  I didn't notice any difference in the 125's or the 250 two strokes as far as vibration goes.  Learn the term 'trail' as that is the biggest change in offset and how your handling will be affected. 

Edited by ossagp
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Aftermarket clamps are often stronger than stock.  Some companies change the offset to fine tune handling characteristics.  All clamps have some offset.  More offset makes the front tire want to turn more as the bike leans over, reduces trail and puts less weight on the front tire.

In a lot of cases it seems like the aftermarket clamps run less offset.  It doesn't seem like increased trail and reduced sensitivity to lean angle would improve handling but on the bike I tried it on that's exactly what I got.  Less tendency to wash out or oversteer.  Front end felt more planted.  Could ride the front end more aggressively into corners.  Of course some bikes are dialed in from the factory in which case you don't have much to gain.

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If you are getting the same offset clamps as stock there is virtually no performance difference to be gained. Some may be a bit stiffer (less flex) but I doubt any of us could actually feel the difference. Some top clamps can offer different bar mount possibilities and you can change to either rubber or solid mounted bars depending on what you have stock.

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I got my first set mainly to mount fat bars.  in 1997 (wow where did the years go) it was what was done.  I didn't like the idea of the top clamp only way,  so I got a full set.  Those were stock spec'd.  Another set was to see if my honda would quit wiggling as much.  It did,  steering seemed slower.   Everything is a trade.  Anyone considering should see if they can ride someone else's with the setup you are considering or just do it based on "wanting to".

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Top clamp only is just for decoration.  Full set with optimized offset is where its at. 

What I don't understand is why the OEM's don't get it together from the factory.  They know what the race teams use.  Would cost them nothing extra to fix the offset.  They're making a triple clamp either way.

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11 minutes ago, turbo dan said:

Top clamp only is just for decoration.  Full set with optimized offset is where its at. 

What I don't understand is why the OEM's don't get it together from the factory.  They know what the race teams use.  Would cost them nothing extra to fix the offset.  They're making a triple clamp either way.

What ET3 bike and a production bike have in common is the color... 

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16 minutes ago, Monk said:

What ET3 bike and a production bike have in common is the color... 

And the frame.  Must be based on a production chassis.  Can add gussets and what not but its got to be a stock basis.

What works on ET3's bike would probably work pretty well on everybody elses bike is what I'm thinking.  Doesn't need to be tricked out anodised billet aluminum, just give the masses the same geometry.

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25 minutes ago, turbo dan said:

And the frame.  Must be based on a production chassis.  Can add gussets and what not but its got to be a stock basis.

What works on ET3's bike would probably work pretty well on everybody elses bike is what I'm thinking.  Doesn't need to be tricked out anodised billet aluminum, just give the masses the same geometry.

It's so much more then that though... Suspension, gearing, braking, linkage etc etc all play a major roll on how a bike will handle. Tomac runs stiffer suspension, different pull rods and knuckle, different shock, bigger brakes, works tires, works transmission with different gearing etc etc... The overall feel of the bike is probably entirely different then a stock KXF... And I haven't mentioned the speed at which he hits things which plays another major roll. Tomac doesn't need the bike to turn as sharp as some slow guy tooling around the Vet track... 

Simply changing the offset can show positive results but for an average person it's pointless, and for Kawasaki to throw 22mm clamps on isn't going to be the end all for the guy in the showroom floor... 

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Depends on the bike.  Made a tremendous difference going from 25 to 22mm on my 05 KX250.  Revalving and bike setup won't cure a flawed chassis. 

If they're building bikes for old people to putter around on I think that would be their first mistake.  Even then though, old guys don't like crashing any more than pro's do.  I think geometry that works at Tomac speed works well at all speeds below that level too. 

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I like 25mm for Sx, 22mm for MX, 12mm on my supermoto. Unless I am running my stiff fork than I like the 25mm for MX. Unless I run my tall seat then the 22s. Still not sure which works best with my longer link. Of course the other day I left the stiff fork on with the tall seat and forgot what clamps I had on. Just to be safe I parked the bike as crashing was most likely imminent.

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