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13 thooth sproket change

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Hello Everyone,

  I Am trying to change my sprocket from a 14 tooth to a 13 tooth on my 2016 CRF250L to get a little more low end power since I ride about 80/20 dirt/road. I have watched some YouTube videos and I see it shouldn't be that hard. I was wondering though, Will I have loosen the back tire/chain tensioner? It looks to me like I could just take of the OEM sprocket off the chain and put the new one on but that's not what I'm seeing online. (Please do note I'm only changing the front sprocket). If anyone has a good/clear directions of how to do this change I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks!

ALSO since I'm making a post anyway. Does anyone else's brakes sort off squeak/grind after riding a lot off road? It seems like dirt may have gotten in front brake. The brakes only have 350 miles on them so I know there not bad. Any info helps!!!

 

 

 

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You will need to loosen the chain adjusters enuf to move the rear wheel forward and remove the chain from the engine sprocket. After sprocket change, readjust chain tension.

Brakes - you may have some sand in there. Hard to say without an inspection.

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2 hours ago, seedy said:

You will need to loosen the chain adjusters enuf to move the rear wheel forward and remove the chain from the engine sprocket. After sprocket change, readjust chain tension.

Brakes - you may have some sand in there. Hard to say without an inspection.

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Edited by gnath9
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I've seen a couple people who just unbolted the sprocket and it was able to come off without moving the back wheel. my guess is that their chain wasn't adjusted properly to begin with......so, if  you've got a loose chain, you could probably just slide the old one off and the new one on, but I wouldn't bank on it. after you put the new one on (in either case) you need to adjust the chain anyway. even though it's a small change (14t to 13t isn't that big) you've still changed the radius in the front so it's just smart to have your chain right.

when I did mine, for whatever reason, we had to get the whole rear wheel off because the sucker wouldn't pull off just moving the wheel forward to loosen the chain....

if nothing else, it's good practice for adjusting the rear wheel.

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When I went from the 14t stock sprocket to a 13t from JT I noticed that the stock one had a piece of rubber on it. The aftermarket sprocket don't have that. Now I hear a humming noise from the chain in the area where the front sprocket is and it drives me nuts. Do you guys think this is normal?

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yes, it's "normal" because that's what that rubber business was there for...to stop that kind of stuff. also, going to a smaller gear increases chain chatter because you're making a tighter turn with the chain

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Changed mine and it made a noticeable difference to acceleration ( quite lively but it also drops top end speed 5-10mph, also throws the speedo out a fair bit  (doing 50mph when showing 58/59mph on speedo), speed error can be corrected with a speedoDRD widget

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9 minutes ago, Tigger800xc said:

Changed mine and it made a noticeable difference to acceleration ( quite lively but it also drops top end speed 5-10mph, also throws the speedo out a fair bit  (doing 50mph when showing 58/59mph on speedo), speed error can be corrected with a speedoDRD widget

 

I can see why the smaller sprocket would lower top speed however it should have no bearing on speedo error since, at least in most bikes, the speed sensor is independent of the gearing.

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1 minute ago, Chas_M said:

 

I can see why the smaller sprocket would lower top speed however it should have no bearing on speedo error since, at least in most bikes, the speed sensor is independent of the gearing.

The speed sensor measures off the gearbox, therefore by reducing by one tooth from the front sprocket (14T to 13T) instead of approx 2.857 rotations of front sprocket for 1 rotation of rear wheel it now needs approx 3.077.  (simply put the rear wheel rotates less for the same output of the gearbox)

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