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What do your new tires look like when you get them (possible bad tire)

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I just got a Dunlop 110/90-19 in the mail and have my concerns. Last tire I got that looked like this would not stay on the bead and kept tearing tubes. Please don't blame my tire installing skills as I've been through many, and other people tried installing that tire after I failed 2 times and it still kept coming off the bead. This one looks the same (notice how the tire bead is so close together)

 

The tire edges as so close together that it will actually have to expand to even make contact with the rim. Is this crap normal? I'm not putting myself through this again.

1494626271755.jpeg

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Your bead lock should keep it from spinning no matter, my old bikes had two locks, my 01 only has one for whatever reason, no problems thou. My son had to ride 10 mile on a flat and smoked his tire lock, maybe thats the problem?

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That is normal, put it in the sun to soften it up before installing.  I have received tires with the beads almost touching due to the way the tires were wrapped together for shipping.

If your tires are slipping on the rim, make sure the rim lock is tight and in good condition.  In some circumstances people actually run 2 rim locks.

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15 minutes ago, SnowMule said:

It's fine.  Probably had something sat on it during shipping. 

Spoon it on, smoosh the tube in there, give it some air.  It'll be just fine.

 

This times 72!

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Ya I've gotten tires in the mail that were wrapped in shrink wrap and IMO that looks fine.

IMO the key thing I do is once the tire is installed and with the rim lock loose, I take it to a gas station with a compressor. I take my soapy water spray bottom and spray both sides of the rim/tire and inflate until the beads pop into place or look even around the rims on both sides.

I then remove the valve/air and bounce the tire a bunch of times. Basically I'm trying to make sure the tube is not twisted inside the tire.

Put in the valve, inflate to a bit more than normal PSI and make sure there is not a leak. Then tighten the rim lock or locks as needed, and adjust PSI to where I want with a digital gauge.

If I can't put them in the sun to warm up before mounting, I'll put my oven on low and put the tire on a chair in front to warm up and obviously not melting it

 

Edited by filterx
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6 hours ago, Berm-Saw said:

 

I just got a Dunlop 110/90-19 in the mail and have my concerns. Last tire I got that looked like this would not stay on the bead and kept tearing tubes. Please don't blame my tire installing skills as I've been through many, and other people tried installing that tire after I failed 2 times and it still kept coming off the bead. This one looks the same (notice how the tire bead is so close together)

 

The tire edges as so close together that it will actually have to expand to even make contact with the rim. Is this crap normal? I'm not putting myself through this again.

1494626271755.jpeg

 

I've had tires like that. With a stiff carcass they can be a bitch to install. Setting in the sun with an inflated tube or other means to spread the beads helps. Talcum on the tube. 

After installation, no issues.

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If you do decide to try a second bead lock, be aware, mounting a tire on a dual lock rim is a royal PITA. Only time I've pinched a tube in the last 10 years was on a dual lock. :banghead:

Edited by OLHILLBILLY
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13 hours ago, filterx said:

Ya I've gotten tires in the mail that were wrapped in shrink wrap and IMO that looks fine.

IMO the key thing I do is once the tire is installed and with the rim lock loose, I take it to a gas station with a compressor. I take my soapy water spray bottom and spray both sides of the rim/tire and inflate until the beads pop into place or look even around the rims on both sides.

I then remove the valve/air and bounce the tire a bunch of times. Basically I'm trying to make sure the tube is not twisted inside the tire.

Put in the valve, inflate to a bit more than normal PSI and make sure there is not a leak. Then tighten the rim lock or locks as needed, and adjust PSI to where I want with a digital gauge.

If I can't put them in the sun to warm up before mounting, I'll put my oven on low and put the tire on a chair in front to warm up and obviously not melting it

 

Even better idea, buy a compressor. ;)  I use my air tools almost every day.  I haven't been without a compressor for 40 years.  When my last one died I was in the middle of some work, ran down and bought another and was back working on what I was doing in less than 2 hours.

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2 hours ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Even better idea, buy a compressor. ;)  I use my air tools almost every day.  I haven't been without a compressor for 40 years.  When my last one died I was in the middle of some work, ran down and bought another and was back working on what I was doing in less than 2 hours.

Ya I've had a compressor on my tool list for a long time but just haven't gotten around to picking one up cus I have a gas station about 2 minutes from my house and other than doing tires it's not something I would use often.

Now with that said, you now made me think about changing tires when I'm dirt bike camping and a small compressor I could run off my inverter or a small gen set would be nice and I do buy cans of compressed air for some jobs on my bikes so I'm going to start looking for an electric unit when they come on sale :)

Thanks for the inspiration :thumbsup:

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3 hours ago, cjjeepercreeper said:

Even better idea, buy a compressor. ;)  I use my air tools almost every day.  I haven't been without a compressor for 40 years.  When my last one died I was in the middle of some work, ran down and bought another and was back working on what I was doing in less than 2 hours.

I can get this 3G compressor on sale locally for $119 CDN.

In your opinion, for doing tires and using it blow stuff with compressed air, would it be a good choice?

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mastercraft-3g-air-compressor-0581290p.html#srp

canvas.png.46ee5b93ee49e96aab28b7d5c65fade8.png

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20 hours ago, MotoX178 said:

That is normal, put it in the sun to soften it up before installing.  I have received tires with the beads almost touching due to the way the tires were wrapped together for shipping.

If your tires are slipping on the rim, make sure the rim lock is tight and in good condition.  In some circumstances people actually run 2 rim locks.

Nailed it, plus it is way easier to get the tire on if it is warm

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18 hours ago, SnowMule said:

It's fine.  Probably had something sat on it during shipping. 

Spoon it on, smoosh the tube in there, give it some air.  It'll be just fine.

 

I ran with one rim lock on the rear with a new tyre and spare wheel (as i only had one spare rim lock, it started slipping...) so i tightened it up more and it stopped slipping. I noticed as the rubber softened up the rim lock was not as tight hence the need to tighten them up when warm or after a day or two i reckon. Especially with hard tyre in winter. ??? 

Edited by surfez

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I would rather have two crazy wives than two rim locks! Never once in my riding since '66 have I had a need for two. Never.

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I thought I was the only one that had problems installing Dunlop tires. Mine usually arrive just like yours with the two beads of the tire almost touching. I can honestly say I've learned something from your post. From now on, I will cut up sections of 2x4 to put inside the tire to hold the beads apart at least 4" and just let it sit over-night, or out in the summer sun until such a time that they don't relax right back together. It was a Dunlop tire that caused me to give up trying to mount my own tires and just take them to the local M/C shop. For $20, they can have it done in 10 minutes or less. Does not help though if I'm working on the bike on a Sunday and need the tire mounted right then.  I'm going to *attempt* to mount my next tire which should be here in just a few days.

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I'd suggest at minimum a 10gal tank with an oiled compressor on an air comp. 

With the bigger tanks, you get a better motor with better duty cycle ratings.  Oilless ones are convenient since they don't need oil, but they don't work as well.

Also, you won't have to listen to the damn thing any time you need a quick shot of air with a bigger tank.

 

And once you start adding other tools - die grinders, air impacts - stuff that needs a lot of cfm's, not just pressure - you'll be glad you have a bigger tank.

 

I have a 12gal comp, 10gal aux tank parallel'd with it.  Setup works well, but when I move i'm going to upgrade to a much larger (40- or 60-gallon) 240v comp. 

IMG_20151105_204639554-L.jpg

 

Another tip: Replace the shitty screw-valve drain on the bottom with an elbow/barb fitting, short length of hose, to a blow gun on the end.  You'll drain it more often with a more convenient drain system, and the tank will last longer.  Air compresses a lot better than water does.

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