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2016 SACH CC FORK REVALVING

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Nice but remember to not left your forks unserviced for 50 hours if you want to preserve them.

20 hours would be my absolute limit if i run those....

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On 5/14/2017 at 8:06 PM, dirtbird said:

Nice but remember to not left your forks unserviced for 50 hours if you want to preserve them.

 

Edited by Krannie McKranface
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1 hour ago, Krannie McKranface said:

....except that would mean I would have to service my forks 10 times a year.....which I am not going to do.

That's what that means. New suspension (all brands) is not set and forget. The forks should have fluid refreshed every 20 hours +/-. The shock is typically 50 hours +/-.

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3 hours ago, Krannie McKranface said:

....except that would mean I would have to service my forks 10 times a year.....which I am not going to do.

Then you learn the hard way.

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On 5/15/2017 at 8:24 AM, motoxgiant said:

That's what that means. New suspension (all brands) is not set and forget. The forks should have fluid refreshed every 20 hours +/-. The shock is typically 50 hours +/-.

 

On 5/15/2017 at 10:05 AM, GP said:

Then you learn the hard way.

 

Edited by Krannie McKranface
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1 hour ago, Krannie McKranface said:

20 hours is too soon

I can usually tell when the oil starts going bad an I can usually push it to 40 or 50 hours

I ride 300 hours a year....

Yeah, I'm on about my 50th suspension tuning in the last 14 years so thanks for yor help

I would think that by 50 revalves in 14 years you would have figured out whats up in the fork and take care of it by yourself!  Anyway, $$ is on your Sachs oil being full of anodizing and aluminum @ 40-50 hrs.

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2 hours ago, GP said:

Then you learn the hard way.

Learn what the hard way? Is there something that wears out quickly on the Sachs stuff?

I have really limited suspension knowledge, so I take my WP stuff in to get work done professionally. Because it requires downtime and money I run SKF seals and wait until they leak to take them in.. Sometimes they last forever. 

Ive let my forks go so long once my tuner said the fluid started to solidify. When I asked about wear he said there was nothing really that needed replacing.. I understand that performance changes with viscosity but it was nothing I wasn't able to handle with the clickers :excuseme:. As long as it works I'm good to go..

Edited by Casing-daily
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18 minutes ago, GP said:

I would think that by 50 revalves in 14 years you would have figured out whats up in the fork and take care of it by yourself!  Anyway, $$ is on your Sachs oil being full of anodizing and aluminum @ 40-50 hrs.

I don't work on an internals any more. Motors, suspension, etc.

No room, no time, no desire, no love for the smell of oil inside my house...

My first motor was a 1968 BSA 650 flat track motor, and my last was a 2008 KX450F.

I have installed more 'fork kit's than I care to remember, and have pulled apart the KYB open bath forks over 20 times, tuning them.

....buy why am explaining myself to you, a crtical stranger, helping no one...

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17 minutes ago, Krannie McKranface said:

....buy why am explaining myself to you, a crtical stranger, helping no one...

Because you just can't stand not typing something

Two professional tuners, one a friend of mine, and another I respect, gave you sound advice on service intervals, which you disagree with.  Thats fine, but there is a reason fork oil comes out dirty, it doesn't change color like a chameleon.  Its a cascade effect, wear debris create more wear and debris.  Bushing teflon picks up this from the oil and things start to roll.

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2 minutes ago, Krannie McKranface said:

I don't work on an internals any more. Motors, suspension, etc.

No room, no time, no desire, no love for the smell of oil inside my house...

My first motor was a 1968 BSA 650 flat track motor, and my last was a 2008 KX450F.

I have installed more 'fork kit's than I care to remember, and have pulled apart the KYB open bath forks over 20 times, tuning them.

....buy why am explaining myself to you, a crtical stranger, helping no one...

I'm with you Bill. I too have had many forks apart. An occasional oil change I don't mind but I leave the valving to someone else. There is only one bike that the valving was not right on the first shot. It was my XR650R. That bike was good for nothing more than fast desert. It beat you up in the rocks. I left it alone though. It worked so good at speed that I was willing to sacrifice some of the low speed handling.

Good review BTW! I just changed the oil and went up a spring rate on my Marzocchi's. Didn't even have to change the seals. The seal saver fork socks really work good at keeping the seals like new. I typically don't change the seals until I change bushings. The 45 Marzocchi's are such a good fork that the bushings have been lasting anywhere from 75-100hrs.

31 minutes ago, GP said:

I would think that by 50 revalves in 14 years you would have figured out whats up in the fork and take care of it by yourself!  Anyway, $$ is on your Sachs oil being full of anodizing and aluminum @ 40-50 hrs.

There have been numerous threads and controversy on "dirty oil". Contrary to what most think, it's the bushing wear and dirt getting past the seals that dirties most of the oil. Hard anodizing properly done will not wear off if the bushings are changed regularly. Once the Teflon/soft copper coating wears through then it's game over. The way I check for bushing wear is by removing front wheel and pull/push each the fork tubes checking for play. In racing conditions with regular oil changes, most bushings typically last 50-100 hrs. My WP's for some reason eat through bushings at about the 50-75 hour mark.

 

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On 5/15/2017 at 1:05 PM, GP said:

Because you just can't stand not typing something

Two professional tuners, one a friend of mine, and another I respect, gave you sound advice on service intervals, which you disagree with.  Thats fine, but there is a reason fork oil comes out dirty, it doesn't change color like a chameleon.  Its a cascade effect, wear debris create more wear and debris.  Bushing teflon picks up this from the oil and things start to roll.

 

 

Edited by Krannie McKranface
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22 minutes ago, Krannie McKranface said:

So what is your point........ I thought you made it. 

You have contributed nothing but negativity.

 

Man, this place sucks somtimes. You can't post anything anymore without it turning into a town forum of 'why don't you just agree with me'.

 

Meh, don't let it get to you.  I enjoyed the read and am happy you are feeling dialed in. 

 

Rocks can be brutal! :D

RockFender.jpg

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15 minutes ago, RhinofromWA said:

Meh, don't let it get to you.  I enjoyed the read and am happy you are feeling dialed in. 

 

Rocks can be brutal! :D

 

Thanks  Rhino

 

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27 minutes ago, RhinofromWA said:

Meh, don't let it get to you.  I enjoyed the read and am happy you are feeling dialed in. 

 

Rocks can be brutal!

RockFender.jpg

+ me too Bill! I value your opinions and feedback. You actually explain things really well. We might not agree on everything but you sure in the hell ride a lot more than most of us! 

Im happy your getting that Beta dialed im just how you like it!

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8 hours ago, ballisticexchris said:

 Contrary to what most think, it's the bushing wear and dirt getting past the seals that dirties most of the oil. Hard anodizing properly done will not wear off if the bushings are changed regularly.

Well, no, it actually is the anodizing wearing. I've been in dozens of sets and have seen it on Sachs, WP, Marzocchis, and KYBs. The time to failure and contributing factors are different for each brand, and sometimes the bushings are also worn, but not always.

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On 5/15/2017 at 9:50 PM, motoxgiant said:

Well, no, it actually is the anodizing wearing. I've been in dozens of sets and have seen it on Sachs, WP, Marzocchis, and KYBs. The time to failure and contributing factors are different for each brand, and sometimes the bushings are also worn, but not always.

 

Edited by Krannie McKranface
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