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Engine mount bolt stuck

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I was taking the motor out of my 03 125sx when I went to take out the rear mount/swingarm axle I couldn't get it out, so I used a punch. Somehow the punch broke off and is stuck in there, and the axle won't budge. I've been trying to get this stupid thing out for about 2 hours and I'm about ready to take the thing to a scrap yard. Made a 30 second job into an impossible one. What the heck should I do

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Lay bike on side and get some PB Blaster (Walmart) and soak it down good for a day or so then try again.

You did take the nut off first right?
Sorry had to ask.

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Lay bike on side and get some PB Blaster (Walmart) and soak it down good for a day or so then try again.

You did take the nut off first right?
Sorry had to ask.

Yeah, the problem is that the axle is half way out, but not far enough to get anything to pull on it, and the punch is in the motor/swing arm area. I've had the bike sideways both ways and upside down, still doesn't help

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Yeah, the problem is that the axle is half way out, but not far enough to get anything to pull on it, and the punch is in the motor/swing arm area. I've had the bike sideways both ways and upside down, still doesn't help

Will it drive back in?
How far in did the lunch break off, is it sticking out at all?

Post a pic or two.

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Will it drive back in?
How far in did the lunch break off, is it sticking out at all?

Won't drive back in, punch broke off at about 3-4in long and is about an inch from the hole. It's cockeyed in there and will not go either way, plus the swingarm and engine have come out of alignment putting even more tension on it

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Won't drive back in, punch broke off at about 3-4in long and is about an inch from the hole. It's cockeyed in there and will not go either way, plus the swingarm and engine have come out of alignment putting even more tension on it

Ok.
You're gonna need to try and crib the motor/swingarm back into alignment with some wood or something then get a bigger hammer and a couple buddy's and beat that sucker back through.
If it went out it will go back in, just need to line up the holes.

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Get that busted punch out and try again with a proper sized punch.

 

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Ok this will sound like bullshit, but If things are bad, they will not get better if you just leave it sit for a while, neither will they get worse.  Patience.  A long long time ago in a world far far away, I broke an easy-out (a hardened steel stud removal tool) in a stud I was trying to get out.  As far as I could see I was screwed due to the location of the stud and it's inaccessibility.    I gave up and went and told my Dad what I had done,  Telling him there was nothing anybody could do.  He went out and spent the next 3 hours with a small chisel and chipped out the stud enough to get the easy-out, then chipped out the rest of the stud.

That taught me to never give up.  There is always a way.  It may not necessarily be easy or fast, but there is always a way.  Like welding a nut to the end of the punch and attaching a slide hammer to it.  Etc.

Good Luck.

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I assume the punch broke off in the center hole in the pivot shaft?  Likely the drift wedged and flared the end of the shaft pinching it in place.  Nothing but brute force, or trying to cut the shaft between the swingarm and engine case, a dicey at best.

 

If you can get it out there is a reasonable chance that you will damage the cases trying to drive it out.  These are all worst case scenarios, but it sounds like you're getting there.

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I'm honestly tempted to put the stupid thing in a hydraulic press. It's about to find its way to Craigslist. I've done just about all I can do, the swingarm wont realign, none of my other punches will fit, the axle won't move foreword or backward, and the more I think about it the harder it seems.

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Youre going to have to try and realign the holes - then punch / press the axle back in or out depending on where the broken punch is - get someone else to help you apply a bit of heat while doing it

if you try and use a press the way it is you could do a whole lotta damage

 

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Well I got it out, the problem was that the broken punch was just about exactly long enough to fit in the cavity between the cases and get lodged sideways, which it did. I had to pull the pivot axle out using a homemade puller then use a magnet to get the punch out

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I really liked the post by GasitandCrash. His tortoise picture was very apt too. Slow and careful wins the race. 

41years ago I took an automotive mechanical trade course, which was the best thing I ever did. I had a bike and car before that, read all the Hotrod and bike mags and fancied myself a pretty good mechanic. Taking that course showed up how little I actually knew. 

 

While I never did become an auto mechanic, those skills stayed with me for life. I did mechanical work in industry for 35 years. I witnessed plenty of incidents where guys just got in deeper and deeper. Like GasitandCrash inferred, when you find yourself in a hole, STOP DIGGING! 

 

Had you re-aligned the motor (as suggested by lhc450 and Midge) by putting the other mounts back on, it would have taken the pinch off the bolt and made the punch problem more obvious. When disassembling anything it is always best to 1) clean everything up, 2) break all the bolts loose first, 3) remove the most difficult bolts first, 4) go slow and really stop to think if you feel you need brute force.  These bolts typically come out with a light tap if not corroded. If corroded they come out with penetrating oil, a lot of spinning and a light tap. Have a look at the end of your bolt:

IMG_3047.JPG

The head is mushroomed up from beating on it with a hammer, damaging the internal threads. The other end will have similar damage. This could have been avoided by keeping the motor aligned in the frame, using some penetrating oil, twisting the bolt as you removed it (you would have noticed the pinch also), and using a soft hammer or soft (wood, brass or aluminum) block to protect the bolt from damage. An aluminum rod drift (cheap, have all sorts of sizes so you have the right size) or bottoming a cheap bolt in the treads on the other side would protect it. A pointed and tapered punch will deform the threaded hole. A good quality punch should not of broke, pointing to buying the best quality tools and using the right tool for the job. 

 

Please take no offense. This was me 40 years ago (and even still now occasionally). This is a chance to learn and I don't mean for it to be at your expense, but for your gain. The guys on here had good advice for you that would have helped. I am glad you got it and didn't loose $$$ on it. 

 

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I really liked the post by GasitandCrash. His tortoise picture was very apt too. Slow and careful wins the race. 
41years ago I took an automotive mechanical trade course, which was the best thing I ever did. I had a bike and car before that, read all the Hotrod and bike mags and fancied myself a pretty good mechanic. Taking that course showed up how little I actually knew. 
 
While I never did become an auto mechanic, those skills stayed with me for life. I did mechanical work in industry for 35 years. I witnessed plenty of incidents where guys just got in deeper and deeper. Like GasitandCrash inferred, when you find yourself in a hole, STOP DIGGING! 
 
Had you re-aligned the motor (as suggested by lhc450 and Midge) by putting the other mounts back on, it would have taken the pinch off the bolt and made the punch problem more obvious. When disassembling anything it is always best to 1) clean everything up, 2) break all the bolts loose first, 3) remove the most difficult bolts first, 4) go slow and really stop to think if you feel you need brute force.  These bolts typically come out with a light tap if not corroded. If corroded they come out with penetrating oil, a lot of spinning and a light tap. Have a look at the end of your bolt:
IMG_3047.JPG.3e85d5222a210c9f5662eedac4db38a7.JPG
The head is mushroomed up from beating on it with a hammer, damaging the internal threads. The other end will have similar damage. This could have been avoided by keeping the motor aligned in the frame, using some penetrating oil, twisting the bolt as you removed it (you would have noticed the pinch also), and using a soft hammer or soft (wood, brass or aluminum) block to protect the bolt from damage. An aluminum rod drift (cheap, have all sorts of sizes so you have the right size) or bottoming a cheap bolt in the treads on the other side would protect it. A pointed and tapered punch will deform the threaded hole. A good quality punch should not of broke, pointing to buying the best quality tools and using the right tool for the job. 
 
Please take no offense. This was me 40 years ago (and even still now occasionally). This is a chance to learn and I don't mean for it to be at your expense, but for your gain. The guys on here had good advice for you that would have helped. I am glad you got it and didn't loose $$$ on it. 
 

The problem was that the other mounts were still in, which didn't make sense why everything got misaligned, but nothing ever goes like it should, lol. The pivot axle actually wasn't damaged at all, other than the end that mushroomed out, but the threads were fine on both ends

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