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Best way to deglaze cylinder using scotch bright pad

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 Currently Rebuilding my 2 stroke top end. What is the best procedure, using scotch bright, to deglaze it with out damaging the cylinder? What procedures to do you guys use to do this, and cleaning the cylinder afterwards? 

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ScotchBrite, ATF and elbow grease, followed by lots of soapy water and multiple wipe downs until the cloth comes out as clean as it went in. UYou cannot damage the barrel with a ScotchBrite.

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I use a green scotchbrite pad, some wd-40 on the pad and on the inside of the cylinder. I just follow the crosshatch with the pad going both ways for a few minutes then wash the cylinder 2-3 times over with warm water, dawn, and a dish scrubber. Most important thing is just to make sure you wash all the grit out before you install your rings. Hit it with an white rag when youre done to make sure its totally clean.

Edited by chickenboy1347
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Also important, make sure to use a new pad

just to make sure there is no embedded metallic debris in it from a previous usage.

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just ... buy a honing brush and quart of honing oil?

Or see if a shop has one and can run it through. 

 

For as infrequently as I hone out the moto, I have a local shop take care of that.  Costs me about $10 and half an hour.

Sled, I have a brush for those...

 

Clean clean clean.  Quick wash before-hand, hone it out, then a good thorough hot-soapy-water scrub afterwards.  Get all the grit out. 

DSC00349-L.jpg

 

DSC00350-L.jpg

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Atf is probably the best its more of a detergent based which lubricates and cleans but I've used penetrate also. Clean til it's clean then clean once more!

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Unless you're running castor oil you have nothing to worry about.  As in don't bother cleaning and scrubbing.  Just put it back together with a new piston and rings.

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1 hour ago, turbo dan said:

Unless you're running castor oil you have nothing to worry about.  As in don't bother cleaning and scrubbing.  Just put it back together with a new piston and rings.

 What are you trying to say?

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Don't bother scrubbing your bore with scotch brite.  Remove jug, replace top end, reinstall jug.  Unless you're running castor oil you don't have a glaze to remove.

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Oh, so you can't glaze one on ANYTHING but bean oil?   Hadn't heard that and I have no idea how I have run across so many cylinders that were run on the stuff. (Because I have sure seen a lot of glazed ones.)   All that said if you wash one really good and assemble it nearly dry or completely dry I bet you can get rings set up for a coated/plated cylinder to seat if you do it right.  (Slavens has my attention when he says to forget about heat cycling.)   

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2 hours ago, SnowMule said:

just ... buy a honing brush and quart of honing oil?

Or see if a shop has one and can run it through. 

 

For as infrequently as I hone out the moto, I have a local shop take care of that.  Costs me about $10 and half an hour.

Sled, I have a brush for those...

 

Clean clean clean.  Quick wash before-hand, hone it out, then a good thorough hot-soapy-water scrub afterwards.  Get all the grit out. 

DSC00349-L.jpg

 

DSC00350-L.jpg

I had a soon to be single friend who used to let me use his sink and diswasher.  I miss him.  

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54 minutes ago, turbo dan said:

Don't bother scrubbing your bore with scotch brite.  Remove jug, replace top end, reinstall jug.  Unless you're running castor oil you don't have a glaze to remove.

:thumbsup:

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4 minutes ago, ossagp said:

I had a soon to be single friend who used to let me use his sink and diswasher.  I miss him.  

When my wife re-did her kitchen, the old appliances went to the garage. Oven for heating parts, sink for washing and the dishwasher for really cleaning (that lye based dishwasher stuff works very well. I got rid of my hot plate I used to use to heat a pan of grease for dipping bearings and chains in.

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Ok guys, 2 stroke noob here. Ridden 4 stroke atvs and dirtbikes all my life but, I've never been the one to do this sort of internal work. Having said that, I just picked up a 2015 KX100 and I plan to do as much work as I can myself including top end rebuilds. Is honing or scrubbing the cylinder with these methods recommended anytime you do a top end rebuild? Do you just grab a scotchbrite pad, some lubricant and scrub out the cylinder followed by a thorough rinsing? I really have no idea but, I'm trying to gather as much info as I can before the time comes to do a rebuild! Thanks!

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Lost count of topend rebuilds on our bikes never scrubed just replace and go. 

Sounds all wisheee washeee to me ...

 

 

 

 

IMG_4371.JPG.336e88a9e0591d2d01f71e93d90574f2.JPG

 

 

I'm trying to do this as right as possible. I'm 16, have worked on, and bought, my own bikes for 2 years. Im the only one in my family who rides, so I have learned as I went.

 

I've narrowed down my career path, and I love to work on engines, to be a mechanic. The best job I can possibly do on this, will help me get my name out a little bit, as well as keep my bike in the best condition.

 

 

 

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Red scotch-brite, soapy water, and then run a hone with a bit of clean oil thru it.

Never had an issue and it always turns out good to the eye.

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There are those that disagree with the necessity of this with modern oils, and others that will tell you to use a hone. I disagree on both aspects. Any oil will leave baked on residues in the cross hatch, and at least for a two-stroke cylinder, hones are best left to people that know how to use them properly, it's too easy to damage the plating around the ports.

 

I use a Scotch Brite pad coated with ATF. I scrub it, then clean with soapy water, and dry with a white paper towel. Repeat until the paper towel stays white.

I believe this is an important step in a rebuild. It cleans the deposits out of the cross-hatch valleys to increase oil retention. It also allows you to be able to better inspect the cross-hatch. In a plated cylinder, the plating is only a few thousandths of an inch thick, so if the cross-hatch is visibly worn, the plating is worn out. 

Edited by The Spanky
Autocorrect stupidity...
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Most plated cylinders are Nikasil, which is harder than most hones. What the honing does is clean the cross hatch, so does Scotchbrite but it takes longer. The cross hatch fills with ring and piston material plus burned oil. Cleaning allows the cross hatch to better hold oil to provides lubrication for the new piston and/or rings.

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