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2017 xc vs xcw gear ratios

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I searched high and low and couldn't find a thread on this.  I know its been well discussed about the last generation models, but not these new ones.  From what I remember, the XCW's of the last generation had a lower 1st and 2nd.....and then 3rd-6th was the same with the XC's.  Does this still hold true with the new bikes.  So you know where I'm going with this, I'm looking to pick up a leftover 250xc (if I can find one) before the 18's come out.  I have 3 PDS bikes of the last generation chassis right now (11' 250xc, 12'300xcw, 14' 200xcw) and while i have zero complaints with PDS, I want to try something new with the linkage.  That leaves me either a 250xc that I would put a light on, or a Husky 250 that has linkage but an "xcw" transmission to my knowledge.  

 

Anyone got hard info concerning the gear ratios for these bikes?  My next stop is KTM talk if I can't get an answer here.  Thanks :)

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Here's a picture of the gear ratio's for a 2017 XC 300 out of the owners Manual.
IMG_2703.JPG
Now someone with a 2017 XC-W 300 needs to go take a picture of its gear ratio's from its owner manual or maybe it can be looked up somewhere on line?

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on the xc 1-3 are tighter than the xcw . 4-6 are the same. 

ive tried them and honestly couldnt tell the difference. maybe someone faster could, but unless your racing at a really high level i dont think youll tell the difference

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on the xc 1-3 are tighter than the xcw . 4-6 are the same. 

ive tried them and honestly couldnt tell the difference. maybe someone faster could, but unless your racing at a really high level i dont think youll tell the difference

Only first gear is really any different between the two for 2017.

 

Third gear is identical and second gear is near identical at only one-one hundredth different.

 

Looking at the ratio's I'm not surprised that you couldn't notice much of a difference.

 

 

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sorry,  your right farmboy...... looking at the ratios im surprised they even bothered making 2 separate parts

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Awsome!!  Thanks guys!.  I think a lower 1st gear which I rarely lose anyways is a good tradeoff if I can find a husky at a cheaper left-over price

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On 5/24/2017 at 7:46 PM, Andrew_v949 said:

I searched high and low and couldn't find a thread on this.  I know its been well discussed about the last generation models, but not these new ones.  From what I remember, the XCW's of the last generation had a lower 1st and 2nd.....and then 3rd-6th was the same with the XC's.  Does this still hold true with the new bikes. 

 

Anyone got hard info concerning the gear ratios for these bikes?  My next stop is KTM talk if I can't get an answer here.  Thanks :)

1st gear is only noticeable difference

2018 xcw ratios: 1st 14:32 2nd 16:26 3rd 20:25 4th 22:23 5th 25:22 6th 26:20

2018 xc  ratios:  1st 15:31 2nd 16:25 3rd 20:25 4th 22:23 5th 25:22 6th 26:20

 

Edited by talkingrain

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Do they use a different final drive ? Longer final drive with shorter 1st gear?

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Forget about gear ratios.  Get the KTM 250XC.  If the husky you refer to is in fact a TE250, then its an XC-W equivalent with linkage.  You're going to be 100x happier with AER fork and the better shock than the x-plor fork.  The x-plor fork is great.... after $900 of work (I own a '17 xc-w btw). The AER fork is near perfect from new as far as I've heard. 

 

Edited by Kangaroo_Smasher
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I have a 2017 XC 300 with the AER forks. I love being able to change the pressure for the riding conditions. I use 150 psi if I'm going to the local MX track and ride, or 140 psi if I'm going to be going trail riding. I am happy with them.

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AER fork is great - but not perfect.  There are certainly some shortfalls ie. rough chop, rolly rocks, off camber hits.  However, they are a wonderfully easy fork to work on, and are highly responsive to tuning (shim changes).  The clickers also have a noticeable tuning range, mostly the rebound.  

I vote AER, and if you have to, they can be less than $200 to set up well (MXT midvalve kit/shim stacks)

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