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Learn how to enjoy hardpack?

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Hello. 

Been riding for a year and generally have good intermediate and sand tracks around me and I like it except for really loamy sand, Ive hurt myself a few times but this post is not about that. 

This is how should I be able to enjoy those dry hardpacks that feels like concrete? Ive been at the track a few times and its already dry and very hard with alot of tiny rocks. They only water for a few mins and almost never ficnthe track so its choppy, bumpy and edges pretty much everywhere. Getting the rear to kick up at you is not uncommon however I notice that some of it goes away when I learn back under full throttle and trying to lift front end. 

Now its to the point I hardly even try at a track like this. First lap I decide its total shit and from there I feel like going home. 

Every other track is prepared and watered even day before a practice to push moist down for more ruts but every hardpack around here just seem to dont give a shit about the track unless there is a race coming up and they water it 2-3 days in a row and turning the soil - that looks awesome but since I dont compete I cant experience it. 

Anyone else feeling like me? Am I just spoiled from the other tracks?

What have you done that helped?

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Tire selection is important.  Most soft and intermediate terrain tires suck on hardpack.  You would do better with something designed for this type of terrain specifically.  I have found that dual sport tires wear well and provide good traction too, as the surface is very similar to dirty pavement.  There is still a limit to traction though and you have to ride accordingly.  You can't ride anywhere near as aggressively on this type of surface as you can in loam or sand. 

I'm seriously considering ordering up a second wheel for my KX so I can have an 18" D606 ready to roll just for this kind of riding.  Much like how some guys run a dedicated paddle tire for dune riding.  The good thing is that dual sport tires can work in sand and everywhere else too, which is a better trade off to me than burning through intermediate terrain tires trying to ride hardpack.

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Soften up your clickers. Slow down for a few laps and just try relax a bit and focus on taking the correct lines. Forget about being aggressive. Just try carry speed, use your ruts. Do your best to get on the gas early and smooth. You will be amazed at how far you can go

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most of our tracks end up this way real fast since we have Quads in our series... i kinda like the dryslicks because that what we ride alot of. Ruts on the other hand scare me to death, so.....u and i need to learn to like and ride the opposites. 

So, i tend to slide the rear end and use it for the pivot before i get on the gas, some guys pivot the rear tire with the throttle, but im afraid of losing the rear and spinning out( lost a PCL that way).   I usually ride a kx450 with mx32's front and rear, and its controllable, but i just bought a 2015 kx250f that has a Kenda Millville II on the rear and (I) feel it to be more controllable/predictable than the mx32.  

SO... go in hard, use lots of brakes since there is no rut to tie you into a line, and when the bike is pointed, get back on the gas. easy-peasy, LOL  i have never rode sand dunes, but im guessing learning to ride dunes and swing the rear tire is prolly like swinging the rear on hardpack... just a guess. 

you practice those hard packs and i will practice a rut when i find it. hope i helped a little bit.

 

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On 5/27/2017 at 10:08 AM, Wessmen said:

Hello. 

Been riding for a year and generally have good intermediate and sand tracks around me and I like it except for really loamy sand, Ive hurt myself a few times but this post is not about that. 

This is how should I be able to enjoy those dry hardpacks that feels like concrete? Ive been at the track a few times and its already dry and very hard with alot of tiny rocks. They only water for a few mins and almost never ficnthe track so its choppy, bumpy and edges pretty much everywhere. Getting the rear to kick up at you is not uncommon however I notice that some of it goes away when I learn back under full throttle and trying to lift front end. 

Now its to the point I hardly even try at a track like this. First lap I decide its total shit and from there I feel like going home. 

Every other track is prepared and watered even day before a practice to push moist down for more ruts but every hardpack around here just seem to dont give a shit about the track unless there is a race coming up and they water it 2-3 days in a row and turning the soil - that looks awesome but since I dont compete I cant experience it. 

Anyone else feeling like me? Am I just spoiled from the other tracks?

What have you done that helped?

The local OHV parks are like this. I started there because it was in expensive ($5 per day) and I would go when not many people there. Once I felt more comfortable controlling the bike I ventured to a nearby privately run track and never went back to the OHV parks. Hardpack eats tires and hurts when you go down.

Only a couple sand tracks near me and they are two hours drive from me. Funny, the two are side by side. I freaking love riding sand. They are well maintained as well.

Yesterday at one of my local tracks: They ripped it deep, watered heavily before opening, watered three times between motos. Ruts were just amazing. Funny though as they get grief for watering so much by some riders who don't like it.

In addition they do a lot to maintain the soil - not long ago they added rice hulls to brake up the clay. About a month ago I swear the track smelled like fertilizer but traction was incredible; It was worth the smell - LoL.

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You have to look at it as a challenge/learning experience at first... and take it slow. I ride 90% sand but I love hard pack days full of power-slides and real throttle/brake control. It is a complete different riding technique, enjoy the variety.

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