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New bike break in

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I recently bought a 2017 dr-z 400sm and I see and hear mixed reviews on how to break these bikes in. I've got 200 miles on it now i have been riding it a mix of babying and running it like I stole it. Any suggestions?

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congrats ! the way it is break in is personal preference, the only thing i would say is change your oil , in the begining is where you will have the most metal shaving, 2 quarts of oil and a filter are cheap.

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congrats ! the way it is break in is personal preference, the only thing i would say is change your oil , in the begining is where you will have the most metal shaving, 2 quarts of oil and a filter are cheap.


I was planning on changing it at 500 and 1000. I agree oil is cheap. Should I change it more often than that?

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it's up to you. on my 2016, i think i changed the oil after 70 miles...lol.
im sure you will be fine by following suzuki recommended intervals.
as long as you follow it.

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Okay thanks for your input I appreciate it! I'll be changing it today! One more question for you. What air filter do you run? I was thinkin about buying a uni

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i haven't changed the air filter (only cleaned it) even though i live in vegas (very dusty desert) i do more street than dirt (bike is my daily driver)
I havent really look at air filter

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http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

Used this methodology with success. I always make sure I break in on non-synthetic oil, dropping it after 20 miles of strong acceleration and deceleration (compression breaking) without banging off the rev limiter. Most of the break-in happens within that 20ish miles. I just broke in a 2017 690 Enduro R using this. So far so good!

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i have my own opinions about break-in .. i think the easier you are on a machine for the first several thousand the better it will turn out if you plan on keeping it .. when theyre brand new its best not to do long rides .. lots of short rides letting it cool off in-between, i wouldnt try to rev high at all and 'see what it will do', 'hard breakin' and all that nonsense, i just wouldnt do it .. i'd let everything polish up including the trans with dino oil for the first several thou, concentrating and working on shifting as smooth as possible both up and down and get the method ironed out for the specific bike your on ... something else i'd do if i could do it over on the drz is jet it right from the start, i wouldnt change air filter or do other mods on a new bike, just change the oil about every 1000-1500, oil filter is not even important, i'd do that every 3rd or 4th oil change .. and dont wring the oil plugs off lol - has to be the most common fckup in the book, the second most common fckup is running the chain too tight ... baby it for awhile and it will reward you with a sweet running smooth and reliable bike for years - my philosophy ..

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i have my own opinions about break-in .. i think the easier you are on a machine for the first several thousand the better it will turn out if you plan on keeping it .. when theyre brand new its best not to do long rides .. lots of short rides letting it cool off in-between, i wouldnt try to rev high at all and 'see what it will do', 'hard breakin' and all that nonsense, i just wouldnt do it .. i'd let everything polish up including the trans with dino oil for the first several thou, concentrating and working on shifting as smooth as possible both up and down and get the method ironed out for the specific bike your on ... something else i'd do if i could do it over on the drz is jet it right from the start, i wouldnt change air filter or do other mods on a new bike, just change the oil about every 1000-1500, oil filter is not even important, i'd do that every 3rd or 4th oil change .. and dont wring the oil plugs off lol - has to be the most common fckup in the book, the second most common fckup is running the chain too tight ... baby it for awhile and it will reward you with a sweet running smooth and reliable bike for years - my philosophy ..

I jetted and did 3x3 with full exhaust right off the bat. I couldn't listen to it stock anymore
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Follow what the engineers that built the bike recommend. Running an engine too hard before the rings have seated is a sure way to scorch your piston.

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IMO and mine only, it doesnt really matter how its run. oil change is more important. the manufactor recommendation to take it easy and stay low in the RPM is more for liability, especially for new riders so they have time to get used to the bike.
of course i could be completely wrong.

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The majority of the heat from the piston exits through the rings. Run it too hard before the rings have seated and you'll overheat your piston.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine_cooling
Only the fixed parts of the engine, such as the block and head, are cooled directly by the main coolant system. Moving parts such as the pistons, and to a lesser extent the crank and rods, must rely on the lubrication oil as a coolant, or to a very limited amount of conduction into the block and thence the main coolant. High performance engines frequently have additional oil, beyond the amount needed for lubrication, sprayed upwards onto the bottom of the piston just for extra cooling. Air-cooled motorcycles often rely heavily on oil-cooling in addition to air-cooling of the cylinder barrels.

Liquid-cooled engines usually have a circulation pump. The first engines relied on thermo-syphon cooling alone, where hot coolant left the top of the engine block and passed to the radiator, where it was cooled before returning to the bottom of the engine. Circulation was powered by convection alone.

Other demands include cost, weight, reliability, and durability of the cooling system itself.

Conductive heat transfer is proportional to the temperature difference between materials. If engine metal is at 250 °C and the air is at 20 °C, then there is a 230 °C temperature difference for cooling. An air-cooled engine uses all of this difference. In contrast, a liquid-cooled engine might dump heat from the engine to a liquid, heating the liquid to 135 °C (Water's standard boiling point of 100 °C can be exceeded as the cooling system is both pressurised, and uses a mixture with antifreeze) which is then cooled with 20 °C air. In each step, the liquid-cooled engine has half the temperature difference and so at first appears to need twice the cooling area.

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This piston was removed at 17k miles.
The bike was never babied a day in it's life. Break-in was riding it home at 60mph for 30 miles. The piston still measures within the service limit. It was only changed to add a big bore. IMG_20170531_084708929.jpg.19e7341099edd4b86159167be2fa877c.jpgIMG_20170531_084715998.jpg.7bbf94605f3a36bfc128de536823aecb.jpg
 
 

I'm gonna be honest with you I don't know what a new one would look like

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