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Suspension Set-Up Help YZ250f

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Hey guys. I just bought a new 2017 YZ250f. I am 14 and I weigh 56kgs. I was told when I bought it that the spring on their is rated for 60kg to 80kg and when I put all my gear on I am about 58-60 kgs. The spring seems to be ok and I obviously need to set my sag, compression and rebound on my first ride but it is pretty tall for me. I was thinking that when I set my sag I could try lowering the bike more than the sag and then buying a softer spring so my sag would be correct would this work? Also I have seen that some people after lowering the back-end also loosen the triple clamps and slide the forks up a little bit. Should I do that? If you guys have any other ideas of how to make the bike sit lower please, please, please, let me know.

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Lowering the bike by increasing the sag isn't the right way to do things.

 

Proper sag measurements sets the ride height for the steering angles (rake/trail, rear anti-squat etc.)

by increasing the sag to lower the bike, you'll loose a lot of turning ability and front end grip, also un-balancing the bike's chassis.

 

Get your gear on, set the rider sag to the suggested height (say 100mm) then measure the remaining free sag,

that will determine if the springs are suited to your weight.  (also measure the forks)

 

Changing the height of the tubes in the triple clamps can be used as a tuning tool for specific track conditions

but again, drastic height changes will affect the geometry.

 

If the bike is too tall for you, the correct way to lower it is by adding internal travel limiting spacers. (avoid lowering links)

Edited by mlatour
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1 minute ago, mlatour said:

Lowering the bike by adding more sag isn't the proper way to do things.

 

Sag measurements sets the ride height to get to proper steering angles (rake/trail, rear anti-squat etc.)

by increasing the sag to lower the bike, you'll loose a lot of turning ability and front end grip.

 

Get your gear on, set the rider sag to the suggested height (say 100mm) then measure the remaining free sag,

that will determine if the springs are suited to your weight.  (also measure the forks)

 

If the bike is too tall for you, the correct way to lower it is by adding internal travel limiting spacers. (avoid lowering links)

I am setting my sag right now and its only 65mm. Therefore meaning I will have to lower it quite a bit to get it to the recommended sag. Afterwards I will check the free sag and see if my spring is too stiff. Thank you. :) 

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Gear on, 1/2 tank of gas, have someone else take measurements while you're standing in the 'attack position'.

 

Set it a 100mm, then measure the free sag. It should fall between 15-40mm, but ideally in the middle of the range at 25-30mm

 

Closer to 40mm free sag means there is very little preload on spring, meaning it's too stiff for your weight. 

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Gear on, 1/2 tank of gas, have someone else take measurements while you're standing in the 'attack position'.
 
Set it a 100mm, then measure the free sag. It should fall between 15-40mm, but ideally in the middle of the range at 25-30mm
 
Closer to 40mm free sag means there is very little preload on spring, meaning it's too stiff for your weight. 

Wait should I be winding the spring or unwinding it? If my sag is only 60?

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At 60mm race sag you should be 'unwinding' it as you say, reducing the preload.

 

 

Edited by mlatour
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At 60mm race sag you should be 'unwinding' it as you say, reducing the preload.

Oh ok so that means the bike is going to sit even higher

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By reducing the preload / increasing the race sag, it will sit LOWER when there's a rider on it

Edited by mlatour
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Image1496200471.994822.jpg Sorry I know this is probably really annoying but I am a complete noob... am I winding it way or way?

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By reducing the preload / increasing the race sag, it will sit LOWER when there's a rider on it

Forgot to quote you above

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By the looks of it your are increasing the preload / reducing sag (the opposite of what you're trying to achieve)

Turn the nut to reduce tension on the spring, meaning it threads going UP the shock's body.

 

Tip: easier to turn this nut with the bike on a stand and the rear wheel off the ground.

 

Edited by mlatour
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By the looks of it your are increasing the preload / reducing sag (the opposite of what you're trying to achieve)
Turn the nut to reduce tension on the spring, meaning it threads going UP the shock's body.
 
Tip: easier to do this with the rear wheel off the ground.
 

Ok thank you soo much I am a complete noob and also thank you for your patience.
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I suspect you will have to run the rebound out of the forks a good bit as well. This will be apparent if the bike tends to push up or ride up in corners. Thats been our experience anyway.

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I suspect you will have to run the rebound out of the forks a good bit as well. This will be apparent if the bike tends to push up or ride up in corners. Thats been our experience anyway.

Thanks by that do you mean soften the rebound in the front forks?

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1 minute ago, motolyfe385 said:


Thanks by that do you mean soften the rebound in the front forks?

Yes. The rebound needs to be softened. My son is a very fast B rider and we had to run his rebound out quite a bit just to get the front end to stay planted in the corners.

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Ok guys update on my suspension I got my race sag set and had to much free sag so I sacrificed 10mm race sag to get the free sag right. Therefore my rear is the best I can get it without buying a new spring. Any suggestions to dial in the front suspension and how to dial in the back even more with rebound and compression?

Yes. The rebound needs to be softened. My son is a very fast B rider and we had to run his rebound out quite a bit just to get the front end to stay planted in the corners.

Ok. How old is your son and what does he weigh (if you don't mind me asking)

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2 minutes ago, Enduro R Rider said:

What type of riding are you doing? MX? Endure? Trails?

I race mx and I do club days on a CRF150r and I just got a 250 so I can race 2 classes when I feel comfortable on my new 250.

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32 minutes ago, motolyfe385 said:

Ok guys update on my suspension I got my race sag set and had to much free sag so I sacrificed 10mm race sag to get the free sag right. Therefore my rear is the best I can get it without buying a new spring. Any suggestions to dial in the front suspension and how to dial in the back even more with rebound and compression?


Ok. How old is your son and what does he weigh (if you don't mind me asking)

He is 20 years old and weighs 165 lbs.

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32 minutes ago, motolyfe385 said:

I race mx and I do club days on a CRF150r and I just got a 250 so I can race 2 classes when I feel comfortable on my new 250.

Well a guy your age and doing this by yourself, you need to feel whats its like to go too far with the suspension settings before you can get it close. Pick a single or small tabletop out on the track and hit it at speed. If its small enough, over jump it and flat land it. Keep taking out fork compression until you feel the front end dive too much on landing. Once you have a feeling of whats too soft, dial compression back into the forks one click at a time until it feels right over the entire track. We have already covered what happens with too much rebound. The rear can be dialed in with ruts and jumps. If the rear of the bike kicks up too much off of the face of the jump decrease rebound. You can dial it in even more with ruts. If the rear will not stay planted going through ruts try taking a click or two of rebound out. The compression can also be dialed in somewhat close with the same jump via flat landing it. I always dial my sons bike in by watching the suspension react to different sections of the track and his feedback. We have always had great success with Factory Connection. We tried Pro Circuit one season and would never go back. Local suspension shops tend to be good too. Good luck!

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