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Corner speed with ruts

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My problem is when I pick a rut and come through the corner my bike wants to get out the rut and go the opposite direction. This usually causes me to almost come to a complete stop or tip the bike over and crash. What's the trick to ripping in the ruts?

Do I need to lay the bike over more when I corner? I've tried doing that and sitting up higher on the seat but when I do that my back end starts sliding out. Am I giving it too much gas as I exit?

Once I'm in the rut do I just steer with my body and keep the bars straight? 

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My problem is when I pick a rut and come through the corner my bike wants to get out the rut and go the opposite direction. This usually causes me to almost come to a complete stop or tip the bike over and crash. What's the trick to ripping in the ruts?
Do I need to lay the bike over more when I corner? I've tried doing that and sitting up higher on the seat but when I do that my back end starts sliding out. Am I giving it too much gas as I exit?
Once I'm in the rut do I just steer with my body and keep the bars straight? 

If you drag the front brake it will help to keep you in the rut. It's a combination of things you need to do at the same time. Look at some YouTube videos on the subject. Good luck.

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if you ride the same  rut over and over, try rebound adjustments on fork, slow rebound will cause a climb, fast will cause a knife. just a simple suggestion. 

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4 hours ago, fidd said:

My problem is when I pick a rut and come through the corner my bike wants to get out the rut and go the opposite direction. This usually causes me to almost come to a complete stop or tip the bike over and crash. What's the trick to ripping in the ruts?

Do I need to lay the bike over more when I corner? I've tried doing that and sitting up higher on the seat but when I do that my back end starts sliding out. Am I giving it too much gas as I exit?

Once I'm in the rut do I just steer with my body and keep the bars straight? 

I'm a novice/beginner rider so for what it is worth:

Sounds like you are saying the front wheel is climbing out of the rut? From a suspension tuning article I use to adjust my suspension - 

Front end climbs out of ruts:
·         Forks spring rate too stiff
·         Forks compression damping too slow (stiff)
·         Forks rebound damping too fast (soft)

IMO, you should have sag well adjusted before working on this part of your suspension. Bike should be turning nicely in flat turns (no understeer, oversteer, washing out or diving).

As mentioned dragging the front brake (lightly) will help with keeping the front tire down in the rut but if the suspension is causing it, it will feel like you are trying to keep Godzilla from rising.

If back wheel is stepping out it is usually by breaking too hard/late in the rut (most if not all braking should be before the entry, light adjustments from entry to apex) or too hard/early on gas (should be rolling on the power).

As far as position on the bike IMO, you need to be resisting braking before entry by being back; wait, wait, wait to go from standing to sitting; going to sitting and putting leg out is one motion; position should be "central" while rolling through the apex and starting to roll on the throttle; weight on the outside peg, squeezing with the legs, use legs to control/lean the bike over. When getting on the gas on the exit you should be leaning forward (squeezing with your abs - it's a great workout) against the acceleration. I have the same issue as you where if I'm too far forward the rear end gets loose. Position on the bike is fluid not static from entry to exit.

Steering of the bike is done with the lean, not turning the bars. The bars are for control and should only need a light touch. Keeping the bike firmly planted (front and back tire) against the wall of the rut will keep it tracking on its intended path. Critical to keep the upper body (arms/hands) loose. Tighten up in a rut and it's over before you started. The amount of lean is depending upon your speed and the rut. A deep narrow rut will require you to use less lean ans hence go a bit slower. A deep wide rut you can lean a lot more and carry more speed by being angled against the outside wall of the rut. Hold your leg up and forward more and you will find leaning the bike easier.

The more confidence you get ridding ruts, the more you'll be able to stop looking down and look forward through/past the exit. The more you get the bike to do the right thing the less you are going to have to correct the bike.

To me the holy-grail of having the suspension settings correct for going though ruts is the point where I'm actually having to counter-steer a bit when getting on the gas after the apex. That's when I'm not having to use the front brake to keep the front wheel down.

A trick I use is to follow a better rider into the inside rut line and do as he does. It's amazing how next time I go through that same rut by myself how much better I do.

I was at one of my favorite tracks yesterday. Track was ripped deep, water heavily, then watered between motos. The guy who owns/maintains the track does an awesome job. The ruts were just simply amazing! By the end of the day the track was so rough. I was just focused on being smooth when going through the ruts. Yea, the fast/awesome guys were still faster than me but funny how many others I was passing simply by being smooth through the ruts.

Youtube videos I have bookmarked on rut ridding:

https://youtu.be/nXVNITiaaTQ?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe
https://youtu.be/nzEkJLmGYOs?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe
https://youtu.be/GTRpYKvEVC8?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe
https://youtu.be/DIjVkugesXE?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe
https://youtu.be/l-HMZ-Cu1O0?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe
https://youtu.be/wnqhX4yV1O8?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe
https://youtu.be/tGI6hV9LHbk?list=PLxR86UD-Ub2qidml9_sQCDW95LW7pvhAe

Practice, practice, practice.

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