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CR 250 1992 shock rebuild

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I´m currently rebuilding a 92 cr 250 and have to change the shock seal. I´ve read a lot of doggers thread in the crf 450 section about suspension rebuild and the float in the valve stack.

What I noticed on my shock is that the shim stack is longer than the section on the rod, so when I tighten the nut down it compresses the shim stack.  If I understand the float thing right, there should be some free play between the shims when the nut is tightened. Is this correct or do I understand something wrong?

The shock was never opened before so it is the original shim stack

 

 

IMG_20170604_1853343.jpg

Edited by oli-5

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2 hours ago, oli-5 said:

oh, thanks for the info,

I´m just learning

Oliver

Here is a great one to start learning and it is faster than going through hundreds forum posts ;)

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Oli-5 

Off topic.. Does that 91cr 250 shock have a bleed hole in the center of the shaft (concentric with the shaft)? Assuming it does or it would have a secondary rebound bleed stack

Or is there a brass plug in there? 

Thanks

G

Edited by gman255

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On 5.6.2017 at 0:59 PM, texasthierry said:

Here is a great one to start learning and it is faster than going through hundreds forum posts ;)

thanks for tip, ordered a copy of this book via amazon grom the UK, let´s see when it arrives

On 7.6.2017 at 1:49 AM, gman255 said:

Off topic.. Does that 91cr 250 shock have a bleed hole in the center of the shaft (concentric with the shaft)? Assuming it does or it would have a secondary rebound bleed stack

Or is there a brass plug in there? 

The original shaft that had the hole in the middle of the shim stack under the piston. I bent the shock when my linkage broke. Luckily I had another shock that came from a husky, but the shaft has the exact same dimensions, so I changed the shaft to my housing. This actual shock has the hole beneath the shim stack as you can see in the picture, no on under the piston. I can take a photo of the original shaft and post it. There is no brass plug.

In my opinion the 92 shock has very little compression and rebound damping, don´t know how the difference in the location of the hole affects rebound damping.

anotherquestion: my bike came with a 94 cr125 kayaba forks in it. During the rebuild I used 5wt fork oil as usual. Now it feels that there is way to less rebound. Is it possible that this forks need 1o wt oil? read somewhere that the recommended oil is Honda SS-8, that should be 10

Oliver

 

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Interesting, My 1991 CR500 KYB shock - if I recall correctly.. I had 2 Bleed holes under the base plate (in the 14mm shaft-similar to a typical shock) and 2 bleed holes (in the 12mm shaft) similar to your bent shock shaft photo. Right at the bleed holes up in the 12mm shaft there is a distribution rebound cup that sits above a standard style piston rebound stack. This rebound cup has bleed veins with a light two shim deflection stack (assuming your original shock had this style bleed stack as well?).. However, my shock shaft was plunged and has no typical concentric rebound bleed at the end of the shaft.  This shock desperately needed bleed.. Apposed to drilling a bleed in the piston I drilled a 1.5 bleed in the brass plug. Major Improvement!

20170222_073557_zpseb3vqbwt.jpg

Edited by gman255

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I don't understand how that bleed hole works, surely it's covered by the piston

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i will take a photo of the inner side of the piston tomorrow and post it when I´m in the garage. The hole is fully coveredby the piston. the bleed hole on top is open on both shafts.

First thing  I noticed after installing the new shaft was that the shock reacts way better on changes on the rebound adjuster.

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16 hours ago, mog said:

I don't understand how that bleed hole works, surely it's covered by the piston

The piston has a groove in its ID that match the bleed hole of the shaft

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Ah ok wonder why not do it the normal way

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