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I am just a semi old feller that would like to lower my 07 450f. I race cross country hare scrambles. I put a pro circuit link on it but it did not lower the height at all. Any good suggestions?

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The best way to lower your bike is internally in the shock/fork with spacers. Racetech sells spacers. Check their website 

The fork you can do yourself if you have little mechanical skill but the shock is better to let a shop do. 

Iam also going to lower my 2014 and thats the way iam going. 

Edited by skorpan777
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Yep, do it right. The forks aren't quite so easy based on the fact that you have to shorten the fork springs the same amount that you lower it. The rear is on an arc with a 3:1 ratio so assuming your spring is correct for your weight, you won't have to change the spring.

The forks are a different matter. Its 1:1. If you shorten 2", you have to have 2" shorter springs, somehow, someway.

Usually you either have to have custom springs made or cut your existing ones, which can be good if you need stiffer springs.

But a brand new product has come out that I'm all excited about. Zeta has come out with shorter spring seats, in 2 sizes. 30mm and 50mm. Plus the kit comes with the internal lowering spacers as well. They only have them for KYB and 2010-2012 Showa Twin Chambers. Retails for $100, which is half the price (at least) to have springs and spacers made.

But lowering it internally, regardless of how ( assuming its correctly done of course) is the only safe way to do it. The biggest factor for me is that the bottoming points stay the same. You do lose travel but you won't have to worry about blowing your tires through the underside of your fenders, possibly leading to crashing.

I have a 17 Kx450 with the Race Tech spring conversion, plus an extra set of 2015 KX250F forks, also springs. I just lowered the stock forks 2" and I'm going to do my shock today or tomorrow. Don't want to tip over in an intersection

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You dont need to shorten the spring but you have to relocate  the clip 

As s you can see in the link under the 2 peices move the complete spring so it dont get any tension

http://www.zeta-racing.com/sus/lowering_f.html

In the picture under you can see how it can be done

you can see the plastic tube that shortens the stroke and the recolation of the black clip on the upper leg so the the complete holder is moved

This is not my work but its a picture of how its done

 

post-176963-0-48926600-1485625439.jpg

Edited by skorpan777
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I am 6' tall and 54 years young lol. I dumped the bike several times in a scramble this last sunday due to not being able to get my feet on the ground lol. Not sure if Im thinking in the right direction or not. Just figured it would help in handling

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I have the same problem in woods/trail, but for MX it's perfect. 

The important is to lower front and back the same so you don't loose any balance. 

If you feel that it is to big just lower it

Iam 176cm and iam going to lower it 3 or 4 cm

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On 6/7/2017 at 1:59 PM, skorpan777 said:

You dont need to shorten the spring but you have to relocate  the clip 

As s you can see in the link under the 2 peices move the complete spring so it dont get any tension

http://www.zeta-racing.com/sus/lowering_f.html

In the picture under you can see how it can be done

you can see the plastic tube that shortens the stroke and the recolation of the black clip on the upper leg so the the complete holder is moved

This is not my work but its a picture of how its done

 

post-176963-0-48926600-1485625439.jpg

I mentioned the Zeta kit which on KYBs is the same as moving the clips. However, you really need to have a machinist do it, and its hard to find one that will do it for a reasonable price. A one off job can run you as much as a pair of custom springs. And I sure wouldn't pay someone to do the carve job pictured above. But yes, that is a great way when done right.

But again, bottom line is the fact that somehow, some way, you have to match the length of the lowering spacer with the same amount of spring reduction/relocation. Some Showas have a long spring guide that you can cut down. Having cut or custom wound springs are generally the easiest and most cost effective way to go

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12 hours ago, HONDA65 said:

I mentioned the Zeta kit which on KYBs is the same as moving the clips. However, you really need to have a machinist do it, and its hard to find one that will do it for a reasonable price. A one off job can run you as much as a pair of custom springs. And I sure wouldn't pay someone to do the carve job pictured above. But yes, that is a great way when done right.

But again, bottom line is the fact that somehow, some way, you have to match the length of the lowering spacer with the same amount of spring reduction/relocation. Some Showas have a long spring guide that you can cut down. Having cut or custom wound springs are generally the easiest and most cost effective way to go

Yes the Zeta kit looks very good. 

For a machinist to do it is pretty easy and fast job

About cutting Springs, it's not just cut and you are done. 

It must become level where you cut it., it means heating with torch and use a hammer to make level! ends. 

It can be done but if you don't do it you will grind the spring in the inside of the fork or if it's the shock at the rear it will bend. 

Just wanted to clarify if somebody want to cut Springs 

 

Edited by skorpan777
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15 hours ago, HONDA65 said:

I mentioned the Zeta kit which on KYBs is the same as moving the clips. However, you really need to have a machinist do it, and its hard to find one that will do it for a reasonable price. A one off job can run you as much as a pair of custom springs. And I sure wouldn't pay someone to do the carve job pictured above. But yes, that is a great way when done right.

But again, bottom line is the fact that somehow, some way, you have to match the length of the lowering spacer with the same amount of spring reduction/relocation. Some Showas have a long spring guide that you can cut down. Having cut or custom wound springs are generally the easiest and most cost effective way to go

If you look closely on the picture youll se that the "rail" for the clip is don with a triangled metal file in the garage.

Its not recommended to do because of obvius danger 

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As for cutting the springs, you are absolutely correct. I didn't dawn on me to clarify that. I can cut springs and I do a damn nice job of it but I do that as a last resort. Because when you cut them, it changes the rate as well.

And yes, it is easy for a.machinist to cut a groove but unless they have nothing to do, I have yet to see one done cheap

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