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Who here services their forks themselves?

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I have a new KTM 150XC-W and I'm considering buying the tools necessary to service the forks myself. I've never done Forks or shocks before but I am mechanically inclined and like to do a lot of work myself. 

Any reason that the job is much harder than it looks and I should leave it to the pros?

Edited by Hulley

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I've done many including WP on a KTM and everything in between a 2016 Beta and a 1973 Yamaha.  The only special tool is a seal slider.  I wouldn't skimp on this tool.  The key is to take your time and have a meticulously clean work area.  I always plan on two separate sessions over two days.  That way, I don't feel the urge to rush the job.  I use clean butcher paper and have a tub ready to catch the oil.  Buy good quality seals and bushings if required.  I'd skip the cheap house brand stuff.

You can buy special tools if you feel the need.  It could make the job easier if you're not used to improvising in the shop.

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Seal slider would be super helpful however I just cut the old seal and use it to knock the new one in with a rubber mallet. If you do it once successfully you'll always do it. You'll need a way of measuring your oil back in also. Overall not to hard of a job!

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Cool, thanks guys. I watched a video of this guy doing his 17' 250xcw and it didn't look bad at all. I have the same forks. The tools aren't expensive, so it wouldn't hurt to get them.

 

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35 minutes ago, Hulley said:

Cool, thanks guys. I watched a video of this guy doing his 17' 250xcw and it didn't look bad at all. I have the same forks. The tools aren't expensive, so it wouldn't hurt to get them.

 

Absolutely makes it easier!

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4 hours ago, Smoking 2's said:

Absolutely makes it easier!

Stick with OEM parts, its been my experience that a lot of aftermarket hard parts are junk. Forks are a minor pain, but easy.

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5 hours ago, Smoking 2's said:

Seal slider would be super helpful however I just cut the old seal and use it to knock the new one in with a rubber mallet. If you do it once successfully you'll always do it. You'll need a way of measuring your oil back in also. Overall not to hard of a job!

Ratio right makes a darn fine measuring cup!

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Two special tools are HIGHLY RECOMMENDED:  Seal driver, and oil level tool (syringe with an adjustable dipstick). 

It also REALLY helps to impact off/on the base bolt (base valve), otherwise it usually just spins unless you have the OTHER special tool: the damper rod holder.  

Go slow, be meticulous, and keep everything CLEAN!  especially if re-assembling shim stacks.  Clean the individual shims while assembling then again as a 'stack' (hit with carb cleaner).

Forks are really quite easy...but you'll definitely get messy the first time! (and the hundredth...)

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I have a new KTM 150XC-W and I'm considering buying the tools necessary to service the forks myself. I've never done Forks or shocks before but I am mechanically inclined and like to do a lot of work myself. 
Any reason that the job is much harder than it looks and I should leave it to the pros?



This is all you need bro

Step by step instructions....

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This is all you need bro
Step by step instructions....


Yep, that's the video I watch!
Two special tools are HIGHLY RECOMMENDED:  Seal driver, and oil level tool (syringe with an adjustable dipstick). 
It also REALLY helps to impact off/on the base bolt (base valve), otherwise it usually just spins unless you have the OTHER special tool: the damper rod holder.  
Go slow, be meticulous, and keep everything CLEAN!  especially if re-assembling shim stacks.  Clean the individual shims while assembling then again as a 'stack' (hit with carb cleaner).
Forks are really quite easy...but you'll definitely get messy the first time! (and the hundredth...)


Thank you sir, both of those tools are pretty inexpensive so I'll go ahead and order them to have them ready!

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