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Can't get all the air out of my tires (and general tire changing)

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Hey, I've got a new-to-me 2008 TE510 that came with offroad tires, which I'm trying to replace with more street-oriented DS tires. I also went all-out and got the full Harbor Freight tire changer setup.

My problem is: I let all the air out, and removed the valve core, but it still seems like there's tons of air in the thing. I'll press down on the tire and hear air hissing out, but when I release it, I'll hear the air hiss back in like there's some vacuum effect going on. Weirdly, if I put the valve core back in and press down on the tire, once again, I hear the hissing out and hissing in.

Now, since there still seems to be air in the tire, I can barely get one spoon in there, and when I pry up, there's literally no additional space to stick another spoon in. . I also unscrewed the rim-lock, but as soon as I push it in, it pops out because of all that pressure still in there. What's going on? The next thing I was going to try the 2x4 and C-clamps trick, but would like some additional feedback.

Thanks all in advanced.

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You want some air in the tube. It helps prevent pinching it with the tyre levers.

 

You probably haven't popped the bead all the way around both sides. Start removal of the tyre at the bead lock and ensure the bead at the opposite side falls into the centre of the rim.

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take it to your local shop and see if you can pay them to change it while giving you a quick tutorial. it takes a few tried to fully grasp what to do. your 1st tire will take an hour. your 10th maybe 10 minutes.

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Thanks for all the suggestions. Watching someone do it in person is probably a good idea, but I'm in too deep now.

Alright, so I finally got it off after much swearing and, pathetically, I'm pretty sore as a result today. I think it did involve me not popping the bead in its entirety. But to my defense, that tire was way stiffer than anything I saw on the Youtube tutorials. Also, since the tube was so stiff, it was actually re-inflating itself, kind of like the way those depressing sleeping pads for camping work.

My next issue is getting the new tire on. Which side should I work in first? Valve side? Rim lock side? Is there anything differently I should do because it has a rim lock?

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Or, like the poster above says-just take it to your local shop and let them change in it 10 minutes or less while you casually shop for new & exciting motorcycle parts & apparel IN THE AIR CONDITIONING. Changing tires is for masochists. If you really dislike the skin on your knuckles, and the blood in your veins, and spending $ for new tubes, and doing the same job multiple times trying to get it right, and scratching up your rim, and possible damaging a new tire, then tire changing is for you!

If, however, you would rather ride right away on a new tire that was properly installed with a smile on your face.. Just let them do it. I gave up on changing tires a few years back. Getting so upset that my whole day is ruined is NOT worth it to me. I'm the type that if I can't master something, I need to just walk away and let someone else do it. Since I've gotten older I've realized my time is much more valuable when focused on important things like family, or making money, and so I DO NOT waste time trying to learn menial tasks that will just piss me off and will wind up in the hands of a more qualified person in the end anyway. So, just give it over to someone who is trying to feed their family. You will be doing everyone involved a favor.

Your rim-lock is jumping back out after you push it in because someone put the rubber spoke protector on top of it and so it has constant pressure to stay in position against the rim. I like to cut a small hole for the bolt to pass through and put the rim lock on top of the rubber spoke protector. Yes, I must admit, after all my bitching about tire changing I have changed 3 in the last 2 weeks. It was not as hard as I remember, but still not how I would prefer to spend my time. If the dealership would come pick up, and then deliver, I would pay extra and let them do them all. I installed a Tubliss system in my rear tire and so I wanted to know how it was done so I did it myself. After mastering that rear tire, I moved on to the front tires on 2 different bikes.

Like the guy above said-you must break the bead/seal between the rim and the tire on BOTH sides before you attempt any removal or installation. Also, once you break the bead/seal I like to hold the tire away from the rim and run a mixture of Dawn dishwashing detergent and water (50/50) all over the bead of the tire and the rim so it can more easily slip over the rim. Work the rim so that it winds up INSIDE the tire.. Then you can just lay it over and pull the rim out without any real fuss.

As always, Youtube is your friend;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovdAADQgcSM

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and I forgot to reinforce what was said above.. the tire MUST BE recessed into the rim in the deepest spot 180 degrees across from where you are working the spoons. This is the key. If you can have someone else help you by holding the tire pinched into the recess in the rim (where the spokes are) while you are working the spoons directly across from where they are holding the tire in, you will find that it is really easy.

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Changing a tyre is a challenging skill to learn, but once you've mastered it, it's way quicker to change it at home than drive it to your local bike shop.

Few tips to remember-
1. start at the beadlock when removing, finish at the beadlock when installing.
2. Use some sort of lube on the new tyre- dishwashing liquid works fine for me.
3. Make sure you push the tyre down from the head as it makes removal/installation so much easier
4. As mentioned above, having some air in the tube makes installation a breeze

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