Jump to content

Newbie

Recommended Posts

Ok so I have been toying around with getting a trials bike for a few years now. So drove to WV last weekend and bought a 03 GG 280txt pro . Bike is in great shape . It has some little things like fork seals ext. The problem is I have no idea on how to set it up for me. I have many years on the mx track and endour racing . Do all of the same rules apply on this style of bike ? Also any tips and pointers on parts and tips on riding would be very appreciated thanx Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, set the clickers in the middle for now.  I'm a year into riding trials and that's where mine still are.  There is a lot of personal preference but from what I've observed, the better you get the "bouncier" (I.e.less compression and rebound) damping you'll want.  That makes the suspension more reactive for doing things like hopping the bike or loading and unloading the suspension to get the bike into the air.

 

But if you are just starting out and you are riding in a club and doing competition, you'll probably be starting in the novice class.  You'll be working on the basics like not getting lost in the sections, full lock turns, hill climbs, off camber stuff, slippery conditions, logs, rocks and obstacles skid plate height or lower, etc.  Having the clickers set in the middle of their range will be fine for that.  So don't get too caught up with things like compression and rebound damping.  By the time it matters you'll know from your personal preference if you need more or less compression or rebound damping.

You'll find in trials it's a lot less about the bike and a lot more about you.  Some of the guys here also own vintage trials bike as an offshoot hobby.  When you see an expert on an old 1970s twin shock effortlessly doing things you can't dream of doing you realize the bike is generally never holding you back.

Definitely join a club.  Definitely attend every competition. If you're not a natural at it (I certainly my wasn't), don't get frustrated.  The odd thing about trials is that, at least around here, many of the people started when they were like 5 years old.  They all make everything look easy.  So it can be frustrating to watch them do something without even trying that you fail at over and over again.  But the trials folks are really nice and willing to help.  You'll never be "in the way" even when you are completely new and have no clue what you are doing.  At least here you'll have a bunch of people encouraging you and cheering for you regardless of how small the obstacle is that you struggled with and finally figured it out.  Of course once your club members get to know you there is a fair bit of friendly ball busting as well.  It's actually a good thing when you get to the point where when you lay it down on the side of a steep hill you get mercilessly heckled by your club mates.

Good luck!  Welcome to the world of trials!  Let us know how it goes.

Doc

 

Edited by Doc_d
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have one club but it's on the other side of the state. About 6 hr from me. So it's got to be a planned thing for me . So most of what I will learn will be form reading and clips. I hope to make it to some of the events and become part of the community.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, deezmx said:

We have one club but it's on the other side of the state. About 6 hr from me. So it's got to be a planned thing for me . So most of what I will learn will be form reading and clips. I hope to make it to some of the events and become part of the community.

Call that trials club 6 hours away and find out if there is anybody close to you.  Riding with someone who's good at it will shorten your learning curve dramatically.  And maybe if there are a couple of guys in your neck of the woods you can start your own club.

How it works here in Michigan is we have 6 clubs.  Each club puts on two competitions per year.  The club members cannot ride their own competition and instead work it.  That's because they'd oviousky have an unfair advantage riding the property and sections they get to practice on all the time not to mention they set the sections for this particular event.  

 

Regardless, when you are starting out focus on balance and turns.  Everything in trials is built on top of that.  You want to get to the point where you can stop and balance in almost every situation.  You should be able to do full lock turns to the left and right as extremely slowly and have a friend or family member yell "stop" at any time and you should be able to stop for a few seconds and then resume your turn.  You should be able to do slow full lock turns to the left and to the right on the side of a steep hill going up or going down.  Learn that your bike will roll over anything that's axle height or smaller.  For bigger obstacles learn to time pulling up the front wheel.  Get very close to the obstacle, dip your knees to compress the suspension and then blip the throttle as you straighten your legs back out and the suspension rebounds to get the front tire up.  The key is to do this without picking up any speed and being very controlled.  I've seen a few guys come out of enduro that can easily clear big obstacles but they do it with a ton more throttle and speed than they need to.  In a real competition there is very often no run-out room after the obstacle which is why you have to rely on control and technique rather than speed and excessive throttle to get over things.

All that sounds easy but a year into it, with the help of experienced people and attending 12 competition per year I'm still working on all that.  Nothing comes easily to me.  But I'm having a blast doing it.  This sport is so much fun.

 

Doc

Edited by Doc_d
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've posted this over in the video forums, but here's a quick video from one of our competitions this year.  Fun stuff!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, deezmx said:

Dam you all make it look easy great video

 

The video doesn't do justice to the steepness of that ridge line.  It's extremely difficult to walk up and down it and there are parts of it you simply cannot walk up or down.  The video also doesn't do justice to the size of some of the obstacles.  There is a big box built from 4x4s that doesn't look like much in the video but to watch the experts splatter up it in person you are like "holy %*#+".  Some events have more man made obstacles.  If I can find some pictures I'll post them up.

 

All the good riders make everything look easy.  Many have been doing it for a very long time.  I decided to get into it at 44, so needless to say it's taking me a while to catch on.   The great thing is there are lines for every skill level.   Even if you just learned to operate a clutch, there is a beginner line for you.  The novice line which I ride focuses on tight turns, off camber turns, up, down and across steep hills (often muddy as we ride rain or shine) and relatively small obstacles.  Most of the obstacles are logs and are at most just a little bit bigger than a telephone pole.   But even the small logs that are 10" can give you fits depending on their placement.  I struggle very badly if I can't hit a log straight on.  If they put a little log mid turn I simply can't do it.   I think that's something I'm going to have to go out and practice over and over again until I figure it out.

 

Doc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Here's a picture that does justice to the size of some of the obstacles.  This particular obstacle is only hit by the "expert" and "advanced" class riders.  You can see from the markers that the "advanced" class riders get to hit the ride side of this obstacle which has a dirt kicker.  The "expert" class markers force them to hit the left side which has no dirt kicker and because the obstacle is round is actually undercut making it even more difficult.

img_0107.800x0.jpg

The "novice" class, has nothing like this though.  It's cool to show the big obstacles the experts deal with, but trials is about you competing against yourself on a line that challenges you but isn't over your head.  If you can operate the clutch, throttle and brakes you can ride the beginner line.  Most people with a some riding experience can ride the novice line.  People with a lot of riding experience or who are naturals can try the intermediate line.  Most people start in Novice if they come from a dirt bike background.

 

Doc

 

Edited by Doc_d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So where do you find parts and manuals for a trials bike. I have subbed the internet and forums. I have been able to find a parts breakdown . But I can't find anything on maintenance procedures or even find a place to order the parts I find on the micro fisch. It like it is a very well kept secret. Lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, deezmx said:

So where do you find parts and manuals for a trials bike. I have subbed the internet and forums. I have been able to find a parts breakdown . But I can't find anything on maintenance procedures or even find a place to order the parts I find on the micro fisch. It like it is a very well kept secret. Lol

 

For an older Gas Gas I'd call Jim Snell at Rising Sun Imports for parts.  He was the US parts distributor until Gas Gas went bankrupt and was taken over.  He's no longer officially the parts importer but has a huge stock of parts especially for the older bikes.  He used to have a lot of videos on YouTube showing various procedures and such but when he had the falling out with the new Gas Gas owners he was forced to take them down since they had the Gas Gas logo and such on them.  It's a shame because there was a lot of knowledge there.

Hopefully the mods don't frown on this but there is a large trials forum called trialscentral.  If you need advice on a specific repair or procedure a post up there in the Gas Gas forum will probably get you the help you need.

 

There isn't a ton of maintenance on the bikes.  Assuming yours is running well now, just keep the chain tension correct (a thumb width between the chain tensioner and the swing arm), change the gear oil every 10 - 20 hours, etc.. Keep an eye on the gear oil. If it ever looks milky you've probably got a water pump seal going bad.  Their kind of a maintenance item on these bikes.  They sell a kit that includes the impeller, shaft and seal.  My bike needed one right after I bought it so I'm guessing every 2 seasons or so.  It's not a big deal if you catch it quickly.  It's pretty easy to spot that your gear lube is milky through the site glass.  The main bearings on these bikes are actually lubed by the gear oil.  So you don't want to go too long once you spot the gear lube has gone a bit milky.

 

Doc

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing I forgot to mention.  People coming from other disciplines tend to use way too much oil in the premix.  As I mentioned these bikes have their main bearings lubed by the gear oil.  They also generally run at lower RPM than 2 stroke MX bikes.  For that reason most people use a good synthetic 2 stroke oil at between 70:1 and 100:1.  I run Motorex 710 at 75:1.  Motorex 800 is much easier to find and works well but has a higher flashpoint than Motorex 710 which leads to a bit more fouling.  But both run pretty clean.  I'm sure there are a bunch of other good choices.   Just use whatever is locally available.  Make sure it's a good modern synthetic and don't use too much (no richer than 70:1).

 

Doc

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanx Doc you have been very helpful . The pre mix would have got me . I run amsoil dominator in all of my KTM but mixed at 44:1 so you just saved me a big head scratcher on why I would foul plugs at a cyclic rate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×