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Yesterday I was taking my bike off my truck's hitch hauler and undid the two back straps first, then undid one of the straps closest to the truck (which was under heavy tension because the suspension was compressed). When I pushed the strap's release button (Ancra cam style pull straps, not ratcheting), it slackened very quickly and the bike tipped off the hauler and trapped my hand when it fell. It was extremely painful, my fingers started turning blue/purple, and now my pointer finger is still not fully back to normal. Anyway, that sucked, but I'm wondering if there are any tips you all have so I can prevent this again. I've done it before, but normally maybe I don't sinch it down so tight, or maybe I'm quicker at pushing the cam release and letting go before too much slack occurs, or maybe I just didn't hold the bike strongly enough this time. I assume a fork brace would do the trick, but the one I got (which a shop told me should fit) does not seem to fit my CRF230F.

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Posted (edited)

Sometimes things just "happen". Have never had an issue when releasing my straps but I always have a firm grip on the bars just in case. I also use the Ancra cam type. I pull them just a little to take the tension off when pushing the button so they don't "spring" back. And I just release them a little bit, not all at once. Try that, I'll bet that will prevent another problem. I learned many many many years ago to take the tension off before releasing.

Edited by YHGEORGE

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Pulling down is a good idea and something I probably did do to be able to push the button when it was so tight. Since I had the suspension fully compressed, as soon as that button was pushed, I have to maintain a lot of strength to counteract the force of the fully compressed suspension pushing up. I'm guessing it caught me by surprise and I couldn't hold it. How far do you compress the suspension? 

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I've dropped my bike off the hauler twice, once on the first day onto concrete. Neither time broke anything, but I tore up my thumb trying to catch it the second time. Got tired of that and made a little holding strap. I put it on as soon as the bike is on the hauler. Move it to the bars when I pry the front wheel out of the well, then remove it and roll the bike down. Won't eliminate possibility of dropping the bike completely, but holds it during the critical moments.

593da56ee2c12_HitchCarrierSafetyTie.jpg.b62d12c8a13f3bbb8923536421b0bc28.jpg

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2 minutes ago, LSHD said:

I've dropped my bike off the hauler twice, once on the first day onto concrete. Neither time broke anything, but I tore up my thumb trying to catch it the second time. Got tired of that and made a little holding strap. I put it on as soon as the bike is on the hauler. Move it to the bars when I pry the front wheel out of the well, then remove it and roll the bike down. Won't eliminate possibility of dropping the bike completely, but holds it during the critical moments.

593da56ee2c12_HitchCarrierSafetyTie.jpg.b62d12c8a13f3bbb8923536421b0bc28.jpg

Simple, I love it. I could attach it to my topper's glass that way, but the latches are pretty shitty, so it might not hold. I'll see if I can come up with something because this looks like a perfect fix. Bonus points for using half a quickdraw.

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Posted (edited)

CE Certified 7075.  :ride:

I put it on as soon as the bike is on the carrier. Then I can relax and get my straps on. Stays on until all the straps are removed. Love it.

Edited by LSHD

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More folks get hurt loading and unloading than expected.....put me on the list too.

 

 

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BB, was it you that lost part of a finger? Gotta keep hands away from the wheels. Those disks are like rotating guillotines.

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3 hours ago, LSHD said:

BB, was it you that lost part of a finger? Gotta keep hands away from the wheels. Those disks are like rotating guillotines.

No it was not me.

But u are right about the discs.......i think mountain bikes are even worse with the thin discs.

Even spinning a brake rotor on truck while doing working on brakes can seriously pinch.

 

keep your digits!

 

 

 

 

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I sometimes use one of these and find that putting my shoulder against the bike helps balance it when I release the straps on the front end. Generally I have one hand on the bars too. 

Those carriers are handy but sure can be a hassle too!

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I compress mine just enough to have it firm, nowhere near fully compressed. Can't imagine doing that. Hopefully you have closed loop(carabiner) ends of your straps, I get mine at a hardware store. Some tie downs come with them. Good luck.

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Posted (edited)

27 minutes ago, YHGEORGE said:

I compress mine just enough to have it firm, nowhere near fully compressed. Can't imagine doing that. Hopefully you have closed loop(carabiner) ends of your straps, I get mine at a hardware store. Some tie downs come with them. Good luck.

EDIT: I read it again and see that you were talking to the OP. :thumbsup:

 

Not quite tracking what you are saying, so I will answer best I can. 

My holding strap doesn't compress suspension at all, just keeps bike from falling over. Actually let's the bike lean away from the back window until I add my tie downs. 

Good point. All tie downs should have clip/closed ends of some kind. My tie downs have Omega 22kn carabiners on each end, as well as the original claw hooks. 

Edited by LSHD

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Been using a rail carrier for over a decade. It sounds like you're crankin' down your straps more than necessary? I always release the inside strap first, but just a quick pop to take some tension off (which isn't a lot). Then I can do the same on the outside strap to equalize them. Maybe use a fork brace so you don't need to put so much tensions on the strap?

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One hand on the handlebar grip, one on the release. Like Bryan said, a little at a time, evenly, from side to side.

I like the holding strap idea as well. We S.U.V. drivers can use the hitch chain holder to anchor the strap.

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Posted (edited)

Before I built the holding strap I always loosened the outside strap first and (gently) leaned the bike against the back window. Problem is you can forget and release the inside strap first, which can be an adventure. Now that I use the holding strap, everything is simpler and safer.

Great idea about the chain holder to anchor the strap. The door handle is easier to reach (now a bar on my new Expedition), but for those worried about tearing off a door handle, nice to be able to use the chain holder.

Just remember to connect holding strap to hard surface on inside and bike (footpeg, etc.) on outside. Connecting to chain holder on inside and carrier on outside will not hold the bike.

Edited by LSHD

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On 6/11/2017 at 0:38 PM, pontoon said:

Yesterday I was taking my bike off my truck's hitch hauler and undid the two back straps first, then undid one of the straps closest to the truck (which was under heavy tension because the suspension was compressed). When I pushed the strap's release button (Ancra cam style pull straps, not ratcheting), it slackened very quickly and the bike tipped off the hauler and trapped my hand when it fell. It was extremely painful, my fingers started turning blue/purple, and now my pointer finger is still not fully back to normal. Anyway, that sucked, but I'm wondering if there are any tips you all have so I can prevent this again. I've done it before, but normally maybe I don't sinch it down so tight, or maybe I'm quicker at pushing the cam release and letting go before too much slack occurs, or maybe I just didn't hold the bike strongly enough this time. I assume a fork brace would do the trick, but the one I got (which a shop told me should fit) does not seem to fit my CRF230F.

You need to simply adjust your technique.  Pull the bike slightly and then loosen the straps enough to let is loosen just a couple of inches towards the vehicle first (important). then then next one.   Then go back to the first one.  repeat until all the tension is off the straps.

You cannot loosen all the tension on a strap at once.    That's risky.  Take your time.  What's your rush?

Don't use a fork brace.    Do not over tension those straps.    

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Posted (edited)

I didn't intentionally let it all out at once. I was trying to do a small amount. I had pulled down to relieve some tension but when I hit the release it released too hard and too much webbing got released and I couldn't hold the bike. The problem was I released the strap to let the bike away from the truck and I had compressed the fork too much. 

Edited by pontoon
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13 hours ago, Just_a_trail_rider said:

You need to simply adjust your technique.  Pull the bike slightly and then loosen the straps enough to let is loosen just a couple of inches towards the vehicle first (important). then then next one.   Then go back to the first one.  repeat until all the tension is off the straps.

You cannot loosen all the tension on a strap at once.    That's risky.  Take your time.  What's your rush?

Don't use a fork brace.    Do not over tension those straps.    

Well stated, much better than my attempt. :thumbsup:

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New Expedition doesn't have a handle to attach safety strap, so now I use this little safety strap until I get the two handlebar straps on.

Tie-Down.thumb.jpg.38c48787149620787a2bd4e81483c407.jpg

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