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I just got back from a weekend of riding and noticed my fork seal leak got really bad and is dripping oil. I am going to replace it but for now is it bad to ride on bad fork seals? For when i replace them how much can i expect to spend on supplies if I do it myself, and how much will a shop charge me 

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You could and run a seal cleaner in there first - might just have a bit of grit stuck in there

 

big_143435169578-cistici-pripravek-gufer-vidlic-45-55mm.jpg

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if they leaked out a few ml... thats ok.  they hold like 350ml.

 

try cleaning it.. chances are its just a spec of dust in there.

 

ive had buddies let them leak.. and leak.. and leak.. and puddle on the floor, then wait 3 more years, they were basically dry. we fixed em, they still ride, and they still have TONS of fun.

 

its not the end of the world if they leak a little and you ride.

 

fixing them is VERY simple.  the RMATV video on youtube walks you through every single step.

 

the full rebuild kit costs $65.  GET THE BUSHINGS!!! dont do just the seals.  get two jugs of oil.   itll probably cost ya around $80 to fully do it yourself. a shop would probably try to ding ya $200+

if you wanna go above and beyond, get the SKF mud scrapers too :)     http://www.ebay.com/itm/SKF-Heavy-Duty-Fork-Oil-Seal-Dust-Wiper-Green-For-2004-2015-Yamaha-YZ125-/192211577895?fits=Model%3AYZ125&hash=item2cc0b3ec27:i:192211577895&vxp=mtr

 

you can get by doing it without special tools... the fork bullet might come in handy, plus its cheap... but theres ways around if youre short on cash/time.   (im not 100% sure what size you need)   http://www.ebay.com/itm/351068144881?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

you might need this bullet: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motion-Pro-Fork-Seal-Bullet-48mm-Orange-for-Yamaha-YZ125-2004-2014-/311447103120?hash=item4883b1a690:g:g4YAAOSwH09ZJvsB&vxp=mtr

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0dLM_IoIOQ

 

Edited by cdf450
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if they leaked out a few ml... thats ok.  they hold like 350ml.
 
try cleaning it.. chances are its just a spec of dust in there.
 
ive had buddies let them leak.. and leak.. and leak.. and puddle on the floor, then wait 3 more years, they were basically dry. we fixed em, they still ride, and they still have TONS of fun.
 
its not the end of the world if they leak a little and you ride.
 
fixing them is VERY simple.  the RMATV video on youtube walks you through every single step.
 
the full rebuild kit costs $65.  GET THE BUSHINGS!!! dont do just the seals.  get two jugs of oil.   itll probably cost ya around $80 to fully do it yourself. a shop would probably try to ding ya $200+

if you wanna go above and beyond, get the SKF mud scrapers too      http://www.ebay.com/itm/SKF-Heavy-Duty-Fork-Oil-Seal-Dust-Wiper-Green-For-2004-2015-Yamaha-YZ125-/192211577895?fits=Model%3AYZ125&hash=item2cc0b3ec27:i:192211577895&vxp=mtr
 
you can get by doing it without special tools... the fork bullet might come in handy, plus its cheap... but theres ways around if youre short on cash/time.   (im not 100% sure what size you need)   http://www.ebay.com/itm/351068144881?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
 
you might need this bullet: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Motion-Pro-Fork-Seal-Bullet-48mm-Orange-for-Yamaha-YZ125-2004-2014-/311447103120?hash=item4883b1a690:g:g4YAAOSwH09ZJvsB&vxp=mtr
 

 

Thank you the fork seal driver I was looking at was 45 for one happy you showed me this. Why should I get the bushings though the bike is low hours? And why two jugs of fork oil
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the seal driver... you cut your old seal in half,and use that GENTLY with a hammer to bang the new one in.. pretty simple.

 

bushings are what keep the two tubes lined up.  weve done JUST seals and had them leak in under a year again.  cheap pays twice!

 

you need like 1100-1200ml of oil.  (1.2L), the jugs only come in 1L bottles!!! ggrrrrr

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the seal driver... you cut your old seal in half,and use that GENTLY with a hammer to bang the new one in.. pretty simple.
 
bushings are what keep the two tubes lined up.  weve done JUST seals and had them leak in under a year again.  cheap pays twice!
 
you need like 1100-1200ml of oil.  (1.2L), the jugs only come in 1L bottles!!! ggrrrrr

What are you talking about with a hammer? Is that a way to do it without the fork seal driver?

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Yes there is. I do it lots. You just need to be careful and take your time. Exact same concept as a seal driver. Use the old seal (cut in half) to bang in the new seal. So the direct light blows aren't right on the new seal. Once he new seal is fully in, take your old seal (which is cut in half) and throw it out! Hack it in half with a hacksaw, angle grinder. Doesn't matter. It's just to bang the new seal in

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Yes there is. I do it lots. You just need to be careful and take your time. Exact same concept as a seal driver. Use the old seal (cut in half) to bang in the new seal. So the direct light blows aren't right on the new seal. Once he new seal is fully in, take your old seal (which is cut in half) and throw it out! Hack it in half with a hacksaw, angle grinder. Doesn't matter. It's just to bang the new seal in

What do I use to bang on the the old seal? Isn't it a tight space

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Search for the TBT Racing how-to videos on YouTube   (showing SSS forks)

once the snap rings are removed, the old seals are driven out by doing a slide hammer motion with the inner/outer fork tubes.

 

The only tips I'd add to the excellent TBT videos are :

-slide the front axle in it's lug as a leverage bar when compressing the spring (to insert/remove the H tool)

-back off all clickers too full soft before disassembly, re-set them afterwards

Edited by mlatour

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Search for the TBT Racing how-to videos on YouTube   (showing SSS forks)
once the snap rings are removed, the old seals are driven out by doing a slide hammer motion with the inner/outer fork tubes.
 
The only tips I'd add to the excellent TBT videos are :
-slide the front axle in it's lug as a leverage bar when compressing the spring (to insert/remove the H tool)
-back off all clickers too full soft before disassembly, re-set them afterwards

-slide the front axle in it's lug as a leverage bar when compressing the spring (to insert/remove the H tool) what do you mean by using the axel? What do I use that for? And what is the h tool? Thought I could do it without costly specialty tools

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Watch the videos.

instead of compressing the spring loaded fork by hand (can be quite hard sometimes) and fiddling to insert the H tool,

you slide the front axle in it's lug and use it as a handle with more leverage.

 

You can make your own H tool out of thick plastic etc. I think some have used an open end wrench as well.

 

The thing is, suspension components can easily be damaged and are expensive to replace.

Using the proper tools and techniques avoids those risks.

 

Also by my experiences, don't be tempted by the lower price of aftermarkets seals and bushings, only use genuine OEM replacement parts.

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Watch the videos.
instead of compressing the spring loaded fork by hand (can be quite hard sometimes) and fiddling to insert the H tool,
you slide the front axle in it's lug and use it as a handle with more leverage.
 
You can make your own H tool out of thick plastic etc. I think some have used an open end wrench as well.
 
The thing is, suspension components can easily be damaged and are expensive to replace.
Using the proper tools and techniques avoids those risks.
 
Also by my experiences, don't be tempted by the lower price of aftermarkets seals and bushings, only use genuine OEM replacement parts.

Ok thank you, is the h tool the one that also has the wrench on the end for the top of the fork? And do you also believe I should get bushings as well?

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Yes get a complete fork refurb kit from Yamaha which includes, main seals, dust seals, upper & lower bushings.

 

The H tool holds the rod / rebound adjuster out of the tube while you loosen/tighten it's locknut.

Some cap 'outer nut' tools (Motion Pro ?) have a slot cut into it so you get 2 tools in 1. 

Ideally you'd want a plastic H tool not to damage the rod, the above mentioned is made of aluminium.

Edited by mlatour
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WATCH THE VIDEOS WATCH THE VIDEOS AND WAFCH THE VIDEOS SOME MORE and you'll know what these guys are referring to. It's fairly easy and easier if you have a manual also.Don't waste money on a seal driver either. I've bought one for my Suzuki and recently needed one to do a yz but it wouldn't fit. Screw using the old seals and a hammer all that's a pain. Wrap electrical tape around the fork tube about a 1/4 thick 6-8in away from the seal and slide hammer with the forks the seal down in the fork. You'll feel when it's fully seated. A few more gentle love taps for easy sleeping and you're set. There's multiple vids on the electrical tape trick too. I was surprised how great it worked. I'll never buy another driver again!

 

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Yes get a complete fork refurb kit from Yamaha which includes, main seals, dust seals, upper & lower bushings.
 
The H tool holds the rod / rebound adjuster out of the tube while you loosen/tighten it's locknut.
Some cap 'outer nut' tools (Motion Pro ?) have a slot cut into it so you get 2 tools in 1. 
Ideally you'd want a plastic H tool not to damage the rod, the above mentioned is made of aluminium.

Ok great thank you so that's the only specialty tool I'll need?

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Bench vise with soft jaws

inner cap wrench

outer cap wrench

H tool

seal driver (electrical tape trick can also do)

seal 'bullet'  (tape / plastic bag trick can do)

graduated cylinder/beaker to accurately measure the oil

plenty of clean shop rags

2 liters of fork oil

can of parts/brake cleaner

 

Again, watch the TBT Racing videos and pause at each steps, 

taking note of what tools are used.

Edited by mlatour
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