Jump to content

twisted forks

Recommended Posts

Hi I have been re aligning my front wheel,i made the mistake of loosening the all 4 of the pinch bolts on the yolks on my 2012 300 which has the CNC orange power parts cnc yolks...Now ive lost the position as the forks slid up in the yolk so what is the best height/measurment from the top of the fork or how many rings should I see for woods and rocky tearrain??...Yes i should have checked it first!!!...

Also the front wheel is still in and ive read its best to loosen the axle pinch bolts and only the lower yolk pinch bolts to align so I should re tighten the upper yolks and start all again from the axle bolts.

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi I have been re aligning my front wheel,i made the mistake of loosening the all 4 of the pinch bolts on the yolks on my 2012 300 which has the CNC orange power parts cnc yolks...Now ive lost the position as the forks slid up in the yolk so what is the best height/measurment from the top of the fork or how many rings should I see for woods and rocky tearrain??...Yes i should have checked it first!!!...
Also the front wheel is still in and ive read its best to loosen the axle pinch bolts and only the lower yolk pinch bolts to align so I should re tighten the upper yolks and start all again from the axle bolts.
Thanks

I have been told that the further up in the triple clamp is better for tight woods riding and/or GNCC. The further up they are the less the rake the further down they are the more the rake. The further down they are I have been told is better for motocross. It's not a big difference either way up and down but translate to a bigger difference on the ground. If I'm wrong someone chime in and correct me.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the forks are adjusted down in the clamp, steering response gets slower.  Slower is better for high speeds/downhill stability while faster is better for tight woods.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been told that the further up in the triple clamp is better for tight woods riding and/or GNCC. The further up they are the less the rake the further down they are the more the rake. The further down they are I have been told is better for motocross. It's not a big difference either way up and down but translate to a bigger difference on the ground. If I'm wrong someone chime in and correct me.

Mostly correct.

Only the further down (less exposed above the top clamp) adds straight line stability. Better for fast desert terrain.

As far as aligning the forks,

Tighten the triple clamps back up using the proper torque value.

Loosen the left axle pinch bolts, torque the axle nut to spec.

Loosen the right pinch bolts, take bike off stand and apply front break then pump forks up and down a few times.

This centers the wheel between the legs.

Put bike back on stand and torque pinch bolts to spec.

I bought a Motion Pro alignment tool that takes the pumping process out of the equation. Much easier IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is gnarly rocky then you will prefer lower position for reduced steering feedback. Try mounting the forks flush with the top triple (as far down as they can go) go for a short ride then try 3 notches up to see if you can feel a difference.  I played around with mine 3 or 4 times before settling on my current setup.  I have mine set at the first notch from the top (almost as far down as they go) and ride lots of rocks, high speeds and plenty of tight technical.  There is no catch all perfect solution, just have to test and see what works best for you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks guys...so is there a general good height for woods rocky stuff.

Your manual should have the upper and lower limits in the tuning section.

I'd put them as high up (tops exposed) as you can per the manual and ride.

Lay out a loop that has similar terrain your trying to get the better performance in and burn a tank of gas on it. Take notes on how it performs and then put the forks down to the lowest setting in the manual and burn another tank of gas on it.

Take notes and compare your results then adjust again to what you feel is the better setting.

Burn some more gas.

 

See the pattern here?

 

Key is to ride the same loop so your results are consistent with terrain.

Edit: Mind you this is all assuming your sag is set properly and there are no mechanical defects in other components like blown seals or worn bearings.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tight and rocky would be the third line from the top. You will lose some straight line stability at high speeds but it will turn better. If you gte head shake at high speed then drop them down a line. Play with it and get the best setting for you.

With KTM you should align the forks by;

  1. Put front axle in
  2. Tighten right side pinch bolts
  3. torque axle nut to spec
  4. Torque left pinch bolts
  5. loosen right pinch bolts
  6. Wiggle right fork around, it will set it's self in place. You need to have no weight on the front tire.
  7. Once it freely sets in place torque the right pinch bolts

Only the right side of the axle has free play to align the forks on a KTM

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's says in my ktm the manual the fork bleeder screw must be facing front?..but the old owner had them at the back to allow for the height of the bleeder valves he installed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's says in my ktm the manual the fork bleeder screw must be facing front?..but the old owner had them at the back to allow for the height of the bleeder valves he installed.

I run mine in the rear position with no ill effects.

Keep them there for bleeder access.

IMG_5026.PNG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really comes down to individual bike, rider, and setup.  Factory was likely on the second line.  I think it's better to error on the side of stability as you can always make the bike turn.  But if the bike doesn't want to go straight that's not good and might even cause you issues in slower sections and sandy spots.  Fork height works together with shock preload, fork springs, rider weight style and ability so there's no magic setting.  I would error on stability side though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×