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Oil is clean, still change?

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Hi guys, 

I purchased a well maintained 2011 400s last December. It had 10k on the clock and I did an oil/filter change right away for good measure.  It now has 10.7k on the clock and I know it is recommended to change oil every 600-1000 miles for longevity. From the dipstick, the oil now (synth 10w40) still looks brand new. My question is, should I still change it soon or is it still good because it is still so clean. It has not been revved very hard since i bought it. 

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I change mine every 1k, and I ride street mostly.  Just depends on what type of riding you do. Oh, and since you're running 10w40 I wouldn't run that oil more than 1k, but that's just me.

Edited by kingbluey

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The color of the oil tells you nothing of its ability to meet the requirements of the specification it is designed to meet.

Oil is inexpensive, failures are not. I'd change it at the interval (that you choose), not its visual condition.

Edited by Gary in NJ
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on the street im not afraid to push it to 2000 miles just commuting and buzzing around pretty easy .. offroad or if you beat on it i wouldnt go more than 1000 ..

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+2

Oil color means little. Filthy oil in a short period of time is an indicator of a internal problem. Clean oil just tells you you have little blowby and minimal moisture/acidic build up. I find on my DRZ, 1,000 miles (on road, SM, mildly aggressive riding 60 to 90 mph) and the oil is done. First I notice it when shifting, the smooth snick-snick is a more labored 'CLICK CLICK'. Not significant but noticable. seems to first appear at about 900 miles into a change. On my dirt bikes, I notice the same at the ten hour mark. So 'wear and tear' wise, it is about the same.

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Thanks guys. Why would 10w40 not last as long as another oil? Should I try a different oil for the next change? Im in S. Cal so the temps will be very warm from now until November.

 

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This thread is looking like it will quickly devolve into an "oil war" thread. Sad!

The viscosity rating of the oil (10w40) is just one factor when choosing an oil. API rating, ZDDP content, synthetic or conventional, cost - are all factors. Look at the peak temperatures you are riding and compare that to the recommended oil in the DRZ owners manual. Also, make sure that you are using a oil designed for wet clutch operation. Lastly, synthetic oil does hold up better. I avoid blends because ratios are typically not provided. 

Here's some light reading: https://bobistheoilguy.com/motor-oil-101/

Edited by Gary in NJ

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sloanranger, just keep in mind....when was the last time you heard of an engine failure due to oil quality. Moderation and moderation in moderation usually works.

 

FWIW, I have used YamaLube 20w50, dino oil for many years without issue. It's fairly cheap and I change it before I hit 2k miles.

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1 hour ago, shuswap1 said:

sloanranger, just keep in mind....when was the last time you heard of an engine failure due to oil quality. Moderation and moderation in moderation usually works.

 

FWIW, I have used YamaLube 20w50, dino oil for many years without issue. It's fairly cheap and I change it before I hit 2k miles.

Sage advice shuswap1, like a motorcycle riding Oscar Wilde.

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2 hours ago, shuswap1 said:

sloanranger, just keep in mind....when was the last time you heard of an engine failure due to oil quality. Moderation and moderation in moderation usually works.

 

FWIW, I have used YamaLube 20w50, dino oil for many years without issue. It's fairly cheap and I change it before I hit 2k miles.

Engine failure is rare if the oil and filter are changed within reasonable periods. There was a thread on this forum this winter/spring about an engine rebuild because the rider went 3,000 miles between changes, so it does happen.  Clutch slippage not so rare. Like I said, use a motorcycle rated oil. 

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1 hour ago, Gary in NJ said:

Engine failure is rare if the oil and filter are changed within reasonable periods. There was a thread on this forum this winter/spring about an engine rebuild because the rider went 3,000 miles between changes, so it does happen.  Clutch slippage not so rare. Like I said, use a motorcycle rated oil. 

Link?

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9 hours ago, SloanRanger said:

Hi guys, 

I purchased a well maintained 2011 400s last December. It had 10k on the clock and I did an oil/filter change right away for good measure.  It now has 10.7k on the clock and I know it is recommended to change oil every 600-1000 miles for longevity. From the dipstick, the oil now (synth 10w40) still looks brand new. My question is, should I still change it soon or is it still good because it is still so clean. It has not been revved very hard since i bought it. 

I'd go 1,500 if I was riding like you are, and that is still conservative. You can always get an oil analysis done if you want. Color does matter. It is a measure of the soot load and the oil breaking down. Not to say you cannot destroy an oil under extreme hard use, but clearly you're not hammering your bike at this time. Run non-ethanol fuel if it's available in your area.

https://www.pure-gas.org/

 

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10 hours ago, Dramabeats said:

Link?

I found the thread I was thinking of. The OP went 9,000 miles with just one oil change at 4,500...but he toasted his engine after a weekend of sand/dune riding. Unfortunately he never closed the loop and gave us a teardown inspection report or photos so we don't know if he toasted a bearing (oil related failure), scored the cylinder (FOD), or was it something totally unrelated to oil condition or FOD. In any event, given the high life of the oil and the riding conditions, I certainly wouldn't consider this situation "normal" or even expected wear - it's just negligence.

 

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