Jump to content

Operating rear brake lever and gears lever while standing

Recommended Posts

Am I the only one having problems changing gears and braking while standing ? It just feels so unnatural and uncomfortable. Is it better after more time on motorcycle ? And how do you do it? Do you brake with your foot on the peg or do you raise it up in order to brake ? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both are challenging to get use to at first. It will get easier, just keep riding and practicing. In general, it is good practice to lift your feet partially off the pegs to operate levers. Meaning unweight them and move to where you need, then keep them in slight contact with the peg for balance and unexpected bike maneuvers that you may have to make. Controlled braking while standing (with weight) on the pegs is very difficult to do. Every bump with mess with your control and cause you to release or slam the lever.

Lever position is very important. I've found running levers high helps a lot with correct technique, as well as shifting while standing as a whole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upshifting while standing:

Shift all your body weight to the right footpeg (on the balls of your feet) momentarily during the shift. Since you're normally accelerating as you upshift, anticipate and lean forward into these forces. You can even point your right toes down and in to help brace against acceleration. Lift your left foot completely off the peg to shift, then place it right back on the peg. Do this while gripping the bike with your legs and using a loose grip and relaxed arms. As you transfer weight to the right peg, the bike will want to lean right. You'll learn to intuitively compensate by using the inside of your right leg to counteract as you lean slightly left. Doing all this will keep your body weight at the lowest pivot point on the bike (footpegs) improving control and keeping you balanced.

Downshifting and braking while standing:

Since you're decelerating your body should be back, using your footpegs to brace against deceleration forces. Knees slightly bent to control rear wheel kicking as it hits obstacles. Move to the arches of your feet and press down on the controls. I find lifting my left foot from the peg (momentarily transferring weight to the right peg) to downshift works best for me. Your controls may need to be raised to operate in this manner, but that allows easier concentration of your weight on the pegs during baking/downshifting. This improves control and dramatically decreases the chances of an endo.

Try not to brace against deceleration with the handlebars. Keep a loose grip and relaxed arms. Doing this will force your body into the correctly balanced position over the bike as you feel deceleration forces through the arches of your feet. Point your toes upward to help your arches more naturally support your deceleration forces through the pegs. Grip the bike with your legs.

An advanced technique is to continue your rear braking as you transition from standing to sitting. Take all your weight off the right peg, transfering it to the left peg. As you lower your body with your left leg, allow your right foot to come completely off the peg. Brace the inside of your right knee against the tank as a pivot point and modulate your brake pedal with ankle flexion. This is the normal way to brake while seated anyway.

Put your bike on a stand and practice these movements first to get the hang of it.

Gary Semics and Shane Watts videos point all this out, as well as many other techniques. Money very well spent.

Have fun!



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adjust both the shifter and rear brake lever up/down as needed so they work when you are standing cus they will still work fine when you are sitting first

Then you can let longer or shorter levers but you this depends on your foot size/boots and what foot pegs you have.

I ride 90% of the time standing with size 11 Tech 10's and try to be on the balls of my feet but I really like to have my toe on the rear brake all the time and slide my left foot forward a bit as needed to shift up/down.

Edited by filterx
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×