Jump to content

Lower back pain

Recommended Posts

Hi all, this is my first post!

I finally bought a 2012 CRF 250 I've had my eye on for a few weeks, and after taking it for a ride today I've got a stiff/sore lower back. It is devastating...I've been looking at getting a road trail for ages and today was the first ride I've been on (except for the test ride at the shop, and the ride from the shop back to my place, both times had no problems at all).

A bit about me: I've been riding a 'postie bike' (Honda CT110 for non-Australians) for a long time, and had a cruiser for a short time (which i wasn't a fan of so I sold it). I had serious lower back issues back as a teenager which were the end of my BMX riding days, but for some reason I can ride the postie for hours on end and besides it not being very fast or aerodynamic I never end up sore afterwards. Wind blown but not sore! I fell in love with the CRF, it's basically a faster, longer-ranged and more reliable version of my postie which I love.

My ride today was only 40ks (25 miles) on mostly tarmac with some gravel (I am building up to trails. I have no other off road experience other than my postie and BMX years ago), it wasn't all that difficult, but it was totally freezing, maybe 5-7 degrees C (45 F). My throttle hand went numb after about 20 minutes and I had to stop at a cafe to warm up, also I was shivering for most of the ride.

Does anyone know what I could be doing wrong? Am I just unfit, do I have wrong technique? I am only 55kgs and 5'4" so the bike feels like a good size to me.

Any help appreciated, I have big plans for big rides :(

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think lower back pain is a common ailment for most of us especially if we have not been riding much. Certainly core exercises and stretching are a huge help. Think about proper stance when both sitting and standing. Squeezing your bike with your ankles and knees especially at critical times will take some of the strain off your arms and back. Quite often that part of the body gets overworked and also needs a day or two off until stronger. Enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stand up.  You will not do any serious trail riding sitting down so you may as well get used to standing.

I had issues with lower back pain due to a mildly herniated disk, which I got as a result of sitting too much at work.  Went to see a physio and learned back stretching exercises to solve the issue.  Much better now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice. I have a job which involves either standing all day, sitting all day or physical labour, and on the sitting all day days I can be very sore.  I have a few back exercises I was given by the physio years ago, and my core, well, that could use some work too. And I'll give standing more of a go :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Tassie.  It's a complicated area and there could be several reasons for your recent back pain, not necessarily directly related to your biking.  The extreme cold on your last ride (shivering) could have contributed because your muscles tense up in the cold).  

I've had chronic lower backpain for nearly 30 years, two discectomy operations and some epidurals.  I pop codeine like sweets (well 8 x 30mgs per day...) and I have become pretty experienced at spotting what causes flare-ups, what relieves it and what doesn't.  I also ride a Beta 450RR off-road for 4 hours every couple of weeks, and I used to race road bikes on tarmac circuits.

Funnily enough riding off-road does not give me any more back-ache than I have already.  I make a point of doing a 5 minute routine of stretching all major muscles before I get into my riding gear and I make a point of standing up for 90% of the time, which is better technique in the dirt anyway.

Try some yoga classes - they can help a great deal and assist in building up core body strength.  Half an hour on a multigym with light weights each day can help a lot too.  If you can afford a sports massage once every couple of weeks, that would be great too - it's well worth the money.  Swimming is excellent.

Good luck - I DO know how you feel.  It can be a long-road to get flexibility back and to tackle the pain when you have a herniated disc or similar.  It's hard, I know, but try to keep moving - don't let it seize up into over-famiiliar shapes where you keep compensating for the injury.  

 

Dave    

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave.  Thanks for your advice,  I've been stretching and doing core exercises since riding and they have helped a lot.  Like I say I had to quit bmx back when I was 13, but before that I injured my tailbone which knocked my hips off kilter for a long time.  Cold effects me badly too as I'm not very big. I'm really hoping it is something simple like that.

I'll keep on the journey and try to keep riding!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, TassieTiger said:

Hi Dave.  Thanks for your advice,  I've been stretching and doing core exercises since riding and they have helped a lot.  Like I say I had to quit bmx back when I was 13, but before that I injured my tailbone which knocked my hips off kilter for a long time.  Cold effects me badly too as I'm not very big. I'm really hoping it is something simple like that.

I'll keep on the journey and try to keep riding!

 

Best of luck with it.  I've lived with this for two-thirds of my life now, and I sometimes get fed up with people dismissing back-ache as 'that inconvenience you get after a bit of digging'.  For full-time sufferers it is life-changing and pain is a constant companion.  But I am determined that it should not stop me from enjoying my hobby as long as I possibly can.

P.S.  I also use a 'hanging machine', which physiotherapists call an inversion table.  A good investment (~€300).  Your feet are locked in behind padded bars and you lie on the table, and once you have set it up right for your weight you can just raise your arms up and the whole table turns you slowly upside down - as far as you want to go.  It stretches the vertebra and allows oxygen to your discs.  Nothing from the Spanish Inquisition holds a candle to it... 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep up the good work Dave. I'm guessing those who dismiss back pain would change their tune if or when they experience it.  Hanging machine sounds brutal!  I'll save up for one,  for now stretches it is. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Best of luck with it.  I've lived with this for two-thirds of my life now, and I sometimes get fed up with people dismissing back-ache as 'that inconvenience you get after a bit of digging'.  For full-time sufferers it is life-changing and pain is a constant companion.  But I am determined that it should not stop me from enjoying my hobby as long as I possibly can.

P.S.  I also use a 'hanging machine', which physiotherapists call an inversion table.  A good investment (~€300).  Your feet are locked in behind padded bars and you lie on the table, and once you have set it up right for your weight you can just raise your arms up and the whole table turns you slowly upside down - as far as you want to go.  It stretches the vertebra and allows oxygen to your discs.  Nothing from the Spanish Inquisition holds a candle to it... 

 

I was going to try this but inversion table sounds like a better idea...Screenshot_20170624-073200.thumb.png.322692b9c2b13e64762ac8ce10fed999.png

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stretching seems to be helping, also so does ockey strapping things down to my rear fender/seat (I need to get a luggage rack) rather than carrying a backpack, and wearing 1000 layers to keep warm.

I've also been doing to 'stopping off at every cafe' thing to drink tea to warm up as I am pretty skinny and have no heat retention. It's funny, I'm not normally a cafe person, and it seems that all the cyclists around here get the same idea. Although I am friendly to all on 2 wheels, engine or not, I get the feeling they don't feel the same way to me :( oh well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im an heavy, heavy coffee drinker for the past 34 years.. (I cut down to only about 8 cups a day now), as much as it feels good, coffee doesn't warm you up (unless you add a little cognac in it...lol) hot cocoa would do a much better job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 cups a day! You are lucky, I can't even drink 1 cup a day, I am lightweight with a capital L! Maybe I should try cocoa, didn't even think of that, or switch to cognac...I'm a beer drinker and that doesn't warm you up at all...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×