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Riding alone, day trip adventure advice.

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The first year I owned my 250L, I gooned around in supermoto trim 100% of the time.  If I wanted to ride off-road I would trailer my dirt bike since there are no extensive public trails within 1 hour of my home.

6 months ago I wore out my street supermoto tires again.  Got busy, never ordered replacements so I swapped over to the stock wheels and tires.  I started venturing further out to do more off-road.  This eventually led to rim locks, better tires, skid plate, full RaceTech suspension and some supplemental luggage.  The luggage I've been carrying is basic.  Wolfman enduro tank bag, Wolfman fender bag, Wolfman bottle holder with 1L of extra fuel.  I also ride with an off brand CamelBak.  I carry basic tools, 1 spare tube and 2 spoons, phone, charger, air pressure guage, bike pump, zip ties, GoPro stuff.

I'm getting bored of the local riding area and I want to start taking full day trips.  I ride alone most of the time, I probably prefer it even.  My questions:

  1. What is your must have gear for day trips that might also fit in my current bare bones luggage?  I don't want more bags.
  2. I don't have rain gear except for my tank bag.  I figure if it's calling for rain I'm not going and if it rains late in the day, I'm headed home.  Bad idea?
  3. Do any of you trailer your bike to get closer to the action?  Most of the riding I want to do is in the mountains of NC.  I'm about 1.5-2 hours east of the roads I'm trying to get to.  That's an extra 3+ hours of riding to get to the good spots and get home!
  4. What do you use for GPS?  I use google maps on my phone typically.  However I don't expect to have service in some locations.
  5. Does anyone use a device like the Garmin InReach?  My wife would prefer I get one of those since I ride alone and will be on remote forest roads.

Thanks for the advice.

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21 hours ago, SoftwareDevJason said:
  • I don't have rain gear except for my tank bag.  I figure if it's calling for rain I'm not going and if it rains late in the day, I'm headed home.  Bad idea?
  • Do any of you trailer your bike to get closer to the action?  Most of the riding I want to do is in the mountains of NC.  I'm about 1.5-2 hours east of the roads I'm trying to get to.  That's an extra 3+ hours of riding to get to the good spots and get home!

only two things I can answer.....or at least have an opinion on.

for rain gear....rain gear is a convenience thing more than anything....nobody wants to ride 12 hours soaking wet. also tends to chafe your bits. assuming you have the space, some of the light weight frog togs packed in somewhere would be good for surprise storms. they're not heavy and pack well. they are ungodly hot in the summer though as they're tyvek so they don't breathe.

for the trailer....there is NOTHING better after a hard day of riding than knowing you don't have to ride any more. if I were going for a solid 5+ hour rip in the woods, I fer derned sure wouldn't want another 1.5hrs on the way home. if you already have a trailer, I'd use it. not exactly hard to load up and scoot on. plus you can bring more beer that way. if not, you can get one of those trailer hitch haulers that are quite a bit easier to manage on the road (or some ramps and just chuck the thing in the bed of a truck).

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My girlfriend solo hikes mountains in NH and always carries an DeLorme InReach. She can send me texts and I can track her online. It works great ands great peace of mind.

It also has an SOS feature (make sure you read the fine print about using this feature and the possibility of receiving a very expensive bill for Rescue Services)

I carry it with me on out of state Trail Rides after a bad experience getting help for an injured rider.

 

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I, too, have watched some of your videos.  The Clutch upgrade one most recently as Im about to do it.  As far as trailering to the trails, I typically do this.  I live about 1-1.5 hrs away from some epic trails and most of that is freeway.  Besides not wanting to ride this bike on the freeway much, its a million times better just loading it up after riding all day and being able to relax a bit on the drive home.

 

I dont know the names of the apps off the top of my head (I think Avenza is one, they have the maps I typically use), but you can download maps for offline use.  As you probably already know, you can still use the GPS on a smartphone with out cellular service.

 

I dont have an inReach, but would really like to get one, however the price is just too much right now.  Right now spot devices are 50% off.  Still have to pay for the subscription, but if you are looking for something purely for peace of mind, it might be a good option.

 

Edit: From what I can tell, the Delorme inReach is no longer available.  It was purchased by Garmin, and seems to be a bit more expensive than the previous models. 

Edited by redtailin
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6 minutes ago, redtailin said:

I dont know the names of the apps off the top of my head (I think Avenza is one, they have the maps I typically use), but you can download maps for offline use.  As you probably already know, you can still use the GPS on a smartphone with out cellular service.

Yes, this is a good point, thanks for mentioning it.  I believe google maps allows this as well.  I would just need to be sure I've saved the maps of the area for offline access.  

Do you have any idea how well google maps works with forest service roads?  When playing with basic google directions, it seems to always divert me away from them back to a main road.  Perhaps there are some settings that eliminate that.  I would hate to turn on a forest road and constantly be told to turn around because the "quicker" way would be to take the highway!

Regarding my videos, I hope you find something useful.  I tend to do my own work on bikes/cars but I'm not a mechanic so I tend to break stuff and do things wrong often :rolleyes:

 

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Fort9 on YouTube just did a rider apps review video a day ago. Listed several applicable apps

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I'm a ultra-light backpacker... here are a few items I keep permanently stored on the bike, in addition to what the OP mentioned:

- zip locks and water purification tablets 

- space blanket

- 450lb technora cord (self rescue from deep sand/mud pit)

- 4oz hand chainsaw (clear trails, fire, make ramps for fallen trees large steps, and make bushcraft tools: wheel stands, bead breaker, flip flop winch)

- spark plug wrench (diagnose problems, evacuate water drown engine)

- OB tampons, Vasoline Lip Therapy tube, fire steel, Gorilla tape wrapped around credit card (first aid and fire starting)

Then for long day solo trips, I do use an Inreach satcom, Garmin 60csx GPS, and might bring:

- UL kitchen (1L Nalgene w/nesting pot, 1oz alcohol stove, fuel, spoon) for a freeze dried meal and afternoon coffee/tea

-  Tyvek groundsheet and Klymit Cush inflatable pillow to sit and lie down (nap) on

- Bug repellant/headnet

- Rain gear

- maybe a poncho tarp (tent)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In Charlotte and I do trailer some times... I carry a phone, credit card, drivers license and some cash all in zip lock bags and at least one bottle of water.

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Mostly I just carry a couple granola bars, some water, a .357, a basic first aid kit on top of the basic hand tools that I always shave strapped to my person and stowed in my bike.

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On 6/22/2017 at 10:24 AM, SoftwareDevJason said:

The first year I owned my 250L, I gooned around in supermoto trim 100% of the time.  If I wanted to ride off-road I would trailer my dirt bike since there are no extensive public trails within 1 hour of my home.

6 months ago I wore out my street supermoto tires again.  Got busy, never ordered replacements so I swapped over to the stock wheels and tires.  I started venturing further out to do more off-road.  This eventually led to rim locks, better tires, skid plate, full RaceTech suspension and some supplemental luggage.  The luggage I've been carrying is basic.  Wolfman enduro tank bag, Wolfman fender bag, Wolfman bottle holder with 1L of extra fuel.  I also ride with an off brand CamelBak.  I carry basic tools, 1 spare tube and 2 spoons, phone, charger, air pressure guage, bike pump, zip ties, GoPro stuff.

I'm getting bored of the local riding area and I want to start taking full day trips.  I ride alone most of the time, I probably prefer it even.  My questions:

  1. What is your must have gear for day trips that might also fit in my current bare bones luggage?  I don't want more bags.
  2. I don't have rain gear except for my tank bag.  I figure if it's calling for rain I'm not going and if it rains late in the day, I'm headed home.  Bad idea?
  3. Do any of you trailer your bike to get closer to the action?  Most of the riding I want to do is in the mountains of NC.  I'm about 1.5-2 hours east of the roads I'm trying to get to.  That's an extra 3+ hours of riding to get to the good spots and get home!
  4. What do you use for GPS?  I use google maps on my phone typically.  However I don't expect to have service in some locations.
  5. Does anyone use a device like the Garmin InReach?  My wife would prefer I get one of those since I ride alone and will be on remote forest roads.

Thanks for the advice.

1 camel back, snacks, phone

2 I plan around rain. hard single track is hard enough.

3 yes

4 (android) aocus , oruxmaps, osmand all work offline.

(ios) scenic, motionx, pocket earth

5 nope. 

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On 6/24/2017 at 0:24 AM, Monk said:

I just head out...

Yeah, in the past I have always subscribed to this practice and it works well right up until it doesn't!  I've had a couple flats, a pinched tube and 1 issue with gas.  Not a big problem in civilization.  Call someone or push the bike 1/4 mile to a gas station.  

It becomes sort of an issue on the side of a mountain with no cellular service, no gas stations, on a road that only exists on forest service maps and on a week day when no one else is riding.  In those situations, it's probably best to follow the Boy Scout motto - "Be prepared".

Edited by SoftwareDevJason

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19 minutes ago, SoftwareDevJason said:

Yeah, in the past I have always subscribed to this practice and it works well right up until it doesn't!  I've had a couple flats, a pinched tube and 1 issue with gas.  Not a big problem in civilization.  Call someone or push the bike 1/4 mile to a gas station.  

It becomes sort of an issue on the side of a mountain with no cellular service, no gas stations, on a road that only exists on forest service maps and on a week day when no one else is riding.  In those situations, it's probably best to follow the Boy Scout motto - "Be prepared".

All the preparation in the world isn't going to help if you don't use your head. 

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10 minutes ago, Crapflinger said:

since when did "Using your head" NOT include being prepared?

Since never IMO.  There is obviously some ambiguity in what the phrase "use your head" means to certain people.

Back to the topic at hand:

I took a day trip on Sunday.  As predicted, I had no cell service for at least 75% of the ride.  I downloaded the entire area from Google maps to work in offline mode.  It worked well. Also, next time I do tire change, I'm going to try to do it with just what I have in my kit.

 

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