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Will Honda warranty cover this?

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Was out riding and dumped the bike and the weld snapped off that holds the bolt that adjusts the rear brake pedal. Now the pedal is way to high and no way to adjust. Bike is 4 months old. I didn't wreck hard enough where I thought this would have broke. But crazier things have happened I suppose. Any help is appreciated. Thanks! 20170623_195747.jpg20170623_195803.jpg20170623_195721.jpg

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The pedal itself is fine, it's the small bolt shown that is welded to the frame that adjusts the height of the pedal. I don't see how it can be replaced other than welding it back on?

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Crap. Sorry. I had to go in the garage to see what mine looks like. Hopefully Honda will cover that, otherwise you will need to find a welder. Good luck with Honda.

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In order for it to be covered under warranty, they would have to replace the frame. Good luck with that.

As others have said, your best bet would be to have it welded back on. Clean the area up good and it won't be a big deal to buzz it back on with a TIG.

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I think with these newer aluminum frame bikes, it's probably not a bad idea to learn how to TIG or MIG and have a small unit in your garage/shop. You can get some nice ones for around $450 new on amazon. I learned TIG in about an hour just sitting down with a welder and using it. It's pretty easy once you get it, kinda like drawing almost!

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2 minutes ago, ASP1227 said:

I think with these newer aluminum frame bikes, it's probably not a bad idea to learn how to TIG or MIG and have a small unit in your garage/shop. You can get some nice ones for around $450 new on amazon. I learned TIG in about an hour just sitting down with a welder and using it. It's pretty easy once you get it, kinda like drawing almost!

Good idea but the frame is steel and maybe it's better not to experiment welding on your own stuff.:excuseme:

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Mild steel like in bike frames is pretty easy to weld as a rule. I always use 316 Stainless filler to smooth the process, and you have to get it completely clean to be sure that you get a good weld. If you don't know exactly what you're doing, it's better to pay someone a few $$ to not have to deal with it again. With smaller pieces and thinner metal, there's a fine line between getting good penetration, and burning stuff up.

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Yeah it takes a certain degree of confidence and skill to weld on your own bike. Not saying you should practice welding on your bike, that's not a good idea, but it's not a bad skill to have. I normally just practice with scrap metal.

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I would let the dealer know Honda has welds failing, but I would recommend finding a professional welder to do the repair.  The frames are originally MIG welded for high production and that's what I would use.  TIG is generally the strongest but a TIG torch might be uncomfortable to get in there without removing some major parts.  Yes, clean, clean, clean down to shiny bare metal.  You might press the dealer for some paint.

I welded this shock reservoir mount with a simple flux core wire feed welder but I would recommend solid wire with a shielding gas.  A grinder and paint makes me the welder I ain't.

shockreservoirbracket0963.jpg.a614da7334debf2840c067459d190c01.jpg

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1 hour ago, ASP1227 said:

Yeah it takes a certain degree of confidence and skill to weld on your own bike. Not saying you should practice welding on your bike, that's not a good idea, but it's not a bad skill to have. I normally just practice with scrap metal.

I've been doing it 8 hours a day for roughly 34 years now. Not a bad skill to have, but sometimes I get the urge to run away and join the circus.. 🙄

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One more thing.. since it's steel, it can also be welded with oxy/acetylene or oxy/propane.  I welded my Husky frame with O/A and never had a problem. 

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2 hours ago, stevethe said:

Good idea but the frame is steel and maybe it's better not to experiment welding on your own stuff.:excuseme:

I have been working in ASME shops for many decades and all I know is the majority of hobby welders who claim they can weld really can't weld very good at all.  The shops I work with have hundreds of WPS, PQR, WPQR on record and the welders I work with have crazy skills.  I have seen some very pretty welds by unqualified welders fail at the weld.  A proper weld is stronger than the base metal and will never fail before the base metal, not taking into account long-term fatigue, stress corrosion, etc.

My advice is to leave welding to professional qualified welders.

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13 hours ago, LiamO86 said:

 

Was out riding and dumped the bike and the weld snapped off that holds the bolt that adjusts the rear brake pedal. Now the pedal is way to high and no way to adjust. Bike is 4 months old. I didn't wreck hard enough where I thought this would have broke. But crazier things have happened I suppose. Any help is appreciated.

Claim it on your insurance. They will either get you a new frame or a new bike, whichever is cheapest.

Frame damage is not a subjective category to insurance companies. I would have had a total on my 955i if I had not told the adjuster that the tiny nick on my frame wasn't part of the current claim.

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52 minutes ago, Baja Rambler said:

I would let the dealer know Honda has welds failing, but I would recommend finding a professional welder to do the repair.  The frames are originally MIG welded for high production and that's what I would use.  TIG is generally the strongest but a TIG torch might be uncomfortable to get in there without removing some major parts.  Yes, clean, clean, clean down to shiny bare metal.  You might press the dealer for some paint.

I welded this shock reservoir mount with a simple flux core wire feed welder but I would recommend solid wire with a shielding gas.  A grinder and paint makes me the welder I ain't.

shockreservoirbracket0963.jpg.a614da7334debf2840c067459d190c01.jpg

C02 and flux wire work awesome together. :smirk:

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Claim it on your insurance. They will either get you a new frame or a new bike, whichever is cheapest.

Frame damage is not a subjective category to insurance companies. I would have had a total on my 955i if I had not told the adjuster that the tiny nick on my frame wasn't part of the current claim.

How many of us carry full insurance coverage on our dirt bikes. Since they are not street legal, I only carry basic liability and medical which is more then I image most even bother with.

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I've been doing it 8 hours a day for roughly 34 years now. Not a bad skill to have, but sometimes I get the urge to run away and join the circus.. 🙄

I took a welding class in tech school. Three hours a day five days a week for a third of a year. The biggest thing I learned was I didn't want to be no dang welder. That being said it comes in real handy as a heavy equipment mechanic.
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7 minutes ago, CRF James said:

How many of us carry full insurance coverage on our dirt bikes. Since they are not street legal, I only carry basic liability and medical which is more then I image most even bother with.

Sorry about that James. I don't know my Honda lineup any more. For all I knew this was a plated enduro, which could have full coverage through Progressive for a ridiculously cheap sum, especially if you are a multi bike owner.

I owned two Hondas in the past and so did my riding buddy. We both have countless stories just like this one regarding our Honda ownership experience. He rides a WR450 now. :ride:

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