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KLR250 lowering links - Alternative bike model?

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I want to lower my KLR250 for a short rider (5'0") and the only source I can seem to find lowering links from is Koubalink.com. They seem excessively priced, so I am wondering if anyone knows if there is a different (more popular) model of bike I can use lowering links from with either no or minimal modification? I see the KL600 is the same, but it seems rarer than the KLR250...

They seem to be priced around $80USD ($120 CAD) plus shipping for a set of links which seems excessive since I can buy links for my ninja for about half the price.

I see the problem seems to be is that the links are not flat, but are slightly thinker where it attaches to the swing arm... I am tempted to find cheaper, flat, longer links from a different bike that I can bore out the holes and use washers (as a spacer for the fatter side of the link) but I feel like this might be a bad idea...

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I can't comment about your KLR, but on my '97 KDX 200, it was very simple to make my own.  I used 1/4" stainless steel plate stock. Cut the links roughly to shape and drill one suitably sized hole in each link, then but a through bolt through them both, clamp both together, and drill the 2nd hole through them both at the same time.

The issue is the center distance between the holes; the greater distance between the holes, the more lowering you will get.  You will need to do some research or experimenting to determine what hole center distance works best for you. Maybe roughing some out from suitable Masonite or similar would help determine the final dimension for the real steel links.

Regarding the difference in thickness, some careful grinding on one end should give you the difference you need.  If you have access to machining, a spot-face or similar might be more workmanlike. 

 

One thing to keep in mind is steering geometry.  As you lower the rear, the fork rake angle will increase.  To compensate for the change in geometry, you can raise the fork legs in the triple clamps, or do internal lowering with the help of a suspension specialist if needed. 

 

 

Edited by maicoguy
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If you think klr650 are the same - StreetRays on ebay have them for about $25 US

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@maicoguy This actually sounds extremely doable for me to do, I think Ill try to do a ply wood mock up to test the height. I was planning to put some heavier fork oil and raising the forks up on the triple to compensate.

@S.O.A.N.Z I am fairly certain these are different for the KLR650. I know the KLR250 and KL600 use the same dog-bone/links and saw on a differnt forum that KLR650 dog-bone/links would not fit on a KL600 (The holes were not the same size and the KL600/KLR250 had a thicker one one side).

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I am 5'5" and put the lowest Koubalinks on my bike, lowered the forktubes as low as possible. $80 well spent, they have been R&D and suspension can be a dangerous thing in the way a bike handles. I am not saying you can't make your own, but do not just guess some length, throw it on the bike and go. You may have to adjust the rear spring preload, compression and rebound as well as front rebound. My bike actually turns better and soaks up the washboards way better. At 5' I do not know if you will be able to put your feet flat on the ground without a professional modifying the suspension and losing travel. I look at it this way, if I make a part for $10 and I have to dodge a dog on a county road, take the ditch, my suspension packs and wrecks the bike, how much $ gets wrecked. 

Have you looked in to a lower seat as well, at 5' you might want to do both.

Lowering mine made a huge difference in me enjoying riding more, I hope you find a way to make it work for you.

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On 7/2/2017 at 10:02 AM, kdxyardsale said:

I am 5'5" and put the lowest Koubalinks on my bike, lowered the forktubes as low as possible. $80 well spent, they have been R&D and suspension can be a dangerous thing in the way a bike handles. I am not saying you can't make your own, but do not just guess some length, throw it on the bike and go. You may have to adjust the rear spring preload, compression and rebound as well as front rebound. My bike actually turns better and soaks up the washboards way better. At 5' I do not know if you will be able to put your feet flat on the ground without a professional modifying the suspension and losing travel. I look at it this way, if I make a part for $10 and I have to dodge a dog on a county road, take the ditch, my suspension packs and wrecks the bike, how much $ gets wrecked. 

Have you looked in to a lower seat as well, at 5' you might want to do both.

Lowering mine made a huge difference in me enjoying riding more, I hope you find a way to make it work for you.

You couldn't possibly tell me what the length between the centers of the holes on the koubalinks were?

I was going to at first try to make mock wooden links first to test the length I needed (essentially make it strong enough for me to put a bit of load on the rear shock) then make metals ones after I get the length right. 

This is just a temporary lowering, where by the rider is likely going to follow me only where ever my ninja can ride too (flat pavement and the occasional parking lot speed bump) so I am not super worried about the suspension performance and I was hoping to keep this lowering under $50... This is for a new rider that needs a few months to learn to ride before buying their own bike. I was planning to lower the front shocks on the tree, but that was about it... I want to put this back to stock height quickly after the new rider gets their own bike.
 

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14 hours ago, Randy Fyfe said:

You couldn't possibly tell me what the length between the centers of the holes on the koubalinks were?

I was going to at first try to make mock wooden links first to test the length I needed (essentially make it strong enough for me to put a bit of load on the rear shock) then make metals ones after I get the length right. 

This is just a temporary lowering, where by the rider is likely going to follow me only where ever my ninja can ride too (flat pavement and the occasional parking lot speed bump) so I am not super worried about the suspension performance and I was hoping to keep this lowering under $50... This is for a new rider that needs a few months to learn to ride before buying their own bike. I was planning to lower the front shocks on the tree, but that was about it... I want to put this back to stock height quickly after the new rider gets their own bike.
 

Hey I was going to measure my klx3 bones for you and found this on another site. They do make a klx4 lowering link, but koubalink says it drops the same as the klx3 and is for non-aggressive riding only. I occasionally think I am still 20 not 51 so I did klx3. I found this info on another site : Stock 117 mm #3 124 mm #4 130 mm. There are some race sag adjustments per the installation instructions, I followed them and the bike is safe and good. I can pm you the other site address forum if you need it, kind of a competitor so not sure how that  plays here. Double check your stock are 117 it should be stamped on the outer side of the bones.

Here is a link to the instructions with the sag adjustments.

http://www.koubalink.com/KLX250-300.html 

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