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Braking in dirtbike tires

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Haha probably sounds like a very dumb question, but is there any sort of braking in of ditbike tires as there is with street bike tires? Or are they as good as there going to be brand new?

Thanks

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Never  heard of such a thing.  But I do know rounded off knobbys hook up better on concrete starts :ride:

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There is no break-in that I've ever heard of perse.  When I used to run a formula car in the SCCA you'd have to be careful scrubbing in new slicks because the tire surface was perfectly smooth and had some kind of release compound on it from the factory.  But besides a careful scrub in, there wasn't anything.  I'm guessing the release compound is almost on a non issue in MX tires but I might be a little careful for the first 10 minutes in a brand new tire.

Doc

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Not a dumb question at all.  I've had a number of new (Dunlop) front tires that would let loose when laid over in corners the first time I rode them.  After one ride they were good.  I'm using Michelin's now and have not had that problem with them.

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I've noticed when I put a new front tire on in the wet season the first 30 minutes the tire doesn't grip as good. Not sure if there is a residue left from the manufacturing process that makes the tire more slick and not grip. 

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A few motocross tire tests I've read mention building up heat in the carcass before the tire works it's best,

meaning if you ride too easy or, during the first few laps of a moto the tire's performance won't be optimal.

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13 hours ago, CR250_182 said:

He's probably just talking about the mold release on the street tires

 

Yes that is correct. Haha lets just say i learned about that the hard way on my supermoto. Didn't make it around the first corner without nearly sliding out! Took a ride or two to wear it off.

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18 hours ago, CR250_182 said:

He's probably just talking about the mold release on the street tires

 

Yeah. At the local race track I was told the way a lot of newbies get caught out is not scrubbing their tyres in before cornering hard.

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Break in procedure for a dirt bike tire? Start the bike, rev to WOT, dump clutch, hold on for dear life. Break in complete. ;)

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12 hours ago, BushPig said:

Yeah. At the local race track I was told the way a lot of newbies get caught out is not scrubbing their tyres in before cornering hard.

It's not the actual scrubbing of the tread, whatever mold release that might be on them will be gone as the tire rolls onto it in the first corner (most all modern sport/track tire manufacturers don't even use a mold release agent anymore). Out lap crashes are caused by not getting the right amount of heat in the tire before pushing it. Unless you're using warmers, it takes two or three laps to get that heat build up needed for the tires to work. Cold tire pressures can play a big role in how much heat is put into the tires. That's why you always check your pressures after every session, as you're looking for a certain (varies by manufacturer and tire type, ambient temp, track temp, etc..) pressure increase from cold to end of session. An example would be the Dunlop rep telling us that we needed to shoot for 36 psi front and rear, at end of session in our Q3s. That involves somewhere in the neighborhood of 31 psi front and 28 psi rear, cold, on an average 80 degree, clear, day. Yeah, I've seen guys bust their asses on the out lap from cold tires more than once. :smirk:

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2 hours ago, OLHILLBILLY said:

It's not the actual scrubbing of the tread, whatever mold release that might be on them will be gone as the tire rolls onto it in the first corner (most all modern sport/track tire manufacturers don't even use a mold release agent anymore). Out lap crashes are caused by not getting the right amount of heat in the tire before pushing it. Unless you're using warmers, it takes two or three laps to get that heat build up needed for the tires to work. Cold tire pressures can play a big role in how much heat is put into the tires. That's why you always check your pressures after every session, as you're looking for a certain (varies by manufacturer and tire type, ambient temp, track temp, etc..) pressure increase from cold to end of session. An example would be the Dunlop rep telling us that we needed to shoot for 36 psi front and rear, at end of session in our Q3s. That involves somewhere in the neighborhood of 31 psi front and 28 psi rear, cold, on an average 80 degree, clear, day. Yeah, I've seen guys bust their asses on the out lap from cold tires more than once. :smirk:

Yes, it was the release agent they were talking about.

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1 hour ago, BushPig said:

Yes, it was the release agent they were talking about.

Then I'd say they were pulling from 20 years back old wives tales. Tire manufacturers (Dunlop, Pirelli, Michelin, etc..) don't use, and haven't used for quite some years now, any mold release agents at all. Even back in the 4 ply days when they did use a mold release agent, it was gone as soon as that section of the tire touched the pavement. But the old rubber compounds were even more susceptible to temperature issues (greasy when cold, then you had a few good laps until they overheated and got even more greasy) than modern carcasses and compounds. From novice track days to MotoGP, out lap crashes are cold tire issues, nothing more. :thumbsup:

Lol, we keep this up and the mods will move the thread to the Street section. :smirk:

Edited by OLHILLBILLY

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If you are running a tubeless set up, and you manually mount a tire, the side wall should stressed to work in the bead. There are other tricks to setting a bead on a tubeless tire/ motorcycle tire/ tires in general. Tube tires are easy as the tube sets the bead.

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