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front tire already ripping in 2 rides... wrong PSI?

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whats the trick for fronts... I know rears you want them low PSI for traction.  whats the deal with the front?  ive got mine fairly hard right now, brand new kenda washougal.   made fresh 3rd week of 2017.  went on 2 rides. superrrrrrr tight, rocky single track.  the my side lugs look like theyre wanting to tear off already. why is that?

 

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My guess is the rocks did that. That tire has a dual compound, soft in the center and harder on the side. In hard terrian you need a soft compound for 2 reasons. 1, it grips better. 2, the knobs can flex so they don't rip off.

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Well a Kenda Washougal is a softer compound tire, if you ride rocky terrain try a harder compound tire next time.

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I got Michelin Star Cross 5 soft on front and Michelin Star Cross S12 for rear   I have tubliss system and have 8 psi on front and rear.  Got 6 rides into them so far.  Still looks new!   I'm pretty impress so far! 

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I got one guy saying in rocky terrain I need a hard compound. Another saying I need soft???

As far as psi. I am not 100% sure. She's hard. Maybe 15ish

Are fronts supposed to be run superrrr soft/ half flat like rears ?

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54 minutes ago, cdf450 said:

I got one guy saying in rocky terrain I need a hard compound. Another saying I need soft???

As far as psi. I am not 100% sure. She's hard. Maybe 15ish

Are fronts supposed to be run superrrr soft/ half flat like rears ?

A tire made for (your) hard terrain is generally a softer compound and visa versa. If you're going to buy a tire for "hard terrain", it will be so designated by the manufacturer. Don't worry about what the make up (compound) of the tire is when buying.

This might help. http://www.motosport.com/blog/the-difference-between-soft-intermediate-and-hard-terrain-dirt-bike-tires

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A tire made for (your) hard terrain is generally a softer compound and visa versa. If you're going to buy a tire for "hard terrain", it will be so designated by the manufacturer. Don't worry about what the make up (compound) of the tire is when buying.
This might help. http://www.motosport.com/blog/the-difference-between-soft-intermediate-and-hard-terrain-dirt-bike-tires

Great minds think alike.
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2 minutes ago, ohiodrz400sm said:


Great minds think alike.

I'm a slow typist. You beat me by one click.:thumbsup:

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very good read. thanks for that.  so I definitely need hard terrain/soft compound tires.  the washougal intermediate terrain isnt holding up too too great.  3 rides and I can already see wear in it.  my damn rears are almost lasting longer haha!!

 

Kenda K775 Washougal II Dual Rubber Front Tire

Designed to meet the demands of intermediate terrains

Tread pattern for intermediate conditions

 

 

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interesting because my bud likes that front because it doesn't chunk the knobs ?  never tried one myself.  which size and what psi ? 

 

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The harder compounds are better for surfaces that can be penetrated.  Softer for the others such as "burned hard pack" and rocks.  You can go too far one way or the other though.   The cheap Kenda TrackMaster works as far as staying together and traction for me unless there is mud involved.  DOT legal too if that matters.   Not the greatest at anything though.  Decent at about 8 out of ten situations.  

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1 hour ago, highmarker said:

interesting because my bud likes that front because it doesn't chunk the knobs ?  never tried one myself.  which size and what psi ? 

 

My youngest son has a pair on his CRF450R and hasn't had that problem.  Our terrain runs from sand to rock and everything in between.  He's running TechnoMousse in them, so who know what psi that equates to.

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well, that tire sure didnt last long.  it ripped early, but provided decent traction throughout its life.

 

im gonna ride it once more, then swap it out.

 

I got about 10 rides on it.

 

bridgestone battlecross x20 80/100 is on the way.  cheap o from fortnine, and the 90/110 was like $15 more!!!

 

 

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Edited by cdf450

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