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Loctite fix front sprocket without chain removal?

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I need to re-torque my fron sprocket nut because it came loose. I might as well do the loctite fix to it but i will not split chain or adjust chain slack. Can I do this while the sprocket is on the splines, ie just goo loctite along the edge and nudge sprocket (with chain on it) front and back a few times to get it into the groves, and then wipe off excess - this is ehat i call ghetto-loctite fix. Or should I not bother at all? Those are my two options - ghetto or none, what do you say? 

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Why don't you loosen the rear tire, or set the snail to 0 and pop the chain? Takes 2 mins tops.

You should probably fully remove sprocket, clean spline and thread while your checking for wear, then lightly 'gooo', as you called it, a small amount on the spline before torqing it down and putting on a new folding washer.

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1 hour ago, RC_ichard said:

Why don't you loosen the rear tire, or set the snail to 0 and pop the chain? Takes 2 mins tops.

You should probably fully remove sprocket, clean spline and thread while your checking for wear, then lightly 'gooo', as you called it, a small amount on the spline before torqing it down and putting on a new folding washer.

Because I dont know how to loosen rear tire, re-adjust chain getting tire straight. I could of course learn, study and try, but I need to limit time and effort at this time. Next free time I shall ride bike, I shall not mechanic it.  

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I need to re-torque my fron sprocket nut because it came loose. I might as well do the loctite fix to it but i will not split chain or adjust chain slack. Can I do this while the sprocket is on the splines, ie just goo loctite along the edge and nudge sprocket (with chain on it) front and back a few times to get it into the groves, and then wipe off excess - this is ehat i call ghetto-loctite fix. Or should I not bother at all? Those are my two options - ghetto or none, what do you say? 

None. Smearing locktight will be a waste of time.

Keep in mind, a countershaft sprocket falling off results in the chain binding, tire locking up instantly, and in many cases the engine oil dumping on the road. This will take you off the road much longer than doing the locktight fix would.
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Loctite is a thread sealer.  You apply it to the threads on the end of the counter shaft that the nut screws onto.  It has nothing to do with the splines of the shaft or the sprocket.  Make sure that you use the blue Loctite, not the red bearing and stud setter or you will never get the nut off of the counter shaft again!

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47 minutes ago, Hugh Dick said:

Because I dont know how to loosen rear tire, re-adjust chain getting tire straight. I could of course learn, study and try, but I need to limit time and effort at this time. Next free time I shall ride bike, I shall not mechanic it.  

bah why bother tightening the nut at all then ?

 

its not hard to learn to do stuff on your bike especially w the knowledge base here, like backwoods said not doing it right now could end poorly sooner rather than later.

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5 hours ago, Backwoods-Bomber said:


None. Smearing locktight will be a waste of time.
 

I know you fellas mean well. I know you think Im an idiot. Thanks for not refusing to answer question even though the scenario goes against your general recommendation. 

Thanks for helping. 

I have decided to consider doing the loctite fix instead of just loctiting and torquing the nut which im sure would hold up for my last 20-30 hours of ride time this season, after which I will have plenty of garage time. For a beginner, what procedure is the easiest to get the front sprocket off? Get a socket wrench, losen rear tire, mark current chain tension adjustments, set them to 0 and pray to Murphy his law does not apply today and chain slack is enough? Or split chain using screwdriver and bending up the clip lock? Other? 

Edited by Hugh Dick
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14 minutes ago, Hugh Dick said:

For a beginner, what procedure is the easiest to get the front sprocket off?

Bend back lock washer. Remove sprocket nut. Remove chain. Remove sprocket. This order is best in case your sprocket nut is very hard to loosen, you have the chain on still so you can use the rear brake to add resistance to the sprocket to add lots of force to the nut without spinning the countershaft.

Removing chain is very easy if you have a clip master link. Undo the master link, and put the bike in neutral, then rotate the chain until its off the front sprocket.

Chain tension only comes into play if you can't get the chain off that easily. If it's too tight to remove like that, you're right, you need to loosen chain by moving the the rear axle closer to the front sprocket. If you have an S model, resetting the chain tension when you're done is made easy by matching the snail adjusters to the same tension setting. SM swingarms have different adjusters that are more of an eyeball measurement, but the S swingarm can be matched on both sides easily.

So with the chain off, you can remove the sprocket entirely, and add loctite. Reinstalling is as simple as using the loctite and torquing the front sprocket nut. Then installing the chain. Like I said, you install the chain and adjust the snail adjusters to the same setting where the chain is at the right tension. Then torque down the rear axle nut.

Here's more info on removing the front sprocket nut.

 

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^^^^^^ What he said. Have a friend step on the brake pedal while you loosen the nut on the countershaft. Then pop off the master link clip on the chain. I find it easiest to roll the bike until the master is at the 2 O-clock position on the rear sprocket. This gives the chain some stability and makes it easier to slide the master out. Two words of caution, if you have an o-ring chain you need to be careful not to lose the o-rings when separating the master link. Not a big deal, just be mindful of them. The other thing is the orientation of the master clip on reinstallation. It needs to have the open end pointing opposite the direction of chain travel.

 

As Hans said, you probably won't even need to change your chain adjustments at all. You should be able to just roll the chain back on unless it's already way too tight.

 

 

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15 hours ago, GlennRay said:

Loctite is a thread sealer.  You apply it to the threads on the end of the counter shaft that the nut screws onto.  It has nothing to do with the splines of the shaft or the sprocket.  Make sure that you use the blue Loctite, not the red bearing and stud setter or you will never get the nut off of the counter shaft again!

While it has been ten years since I did this fix, my recollection is that the sprocket moving on the splines begins to wear the back spacer, which lets the shaft slip into the transmission, which causes a catastrophic gearbox failure. This fix is to remedy something you cannot see when doing the repair, and has everything to do with the fit of the sprocket on the splines. Red Loctite is used due to its higher strength. Heat from your shop heatgun, your penetrant, and your impact wrench will allow disassembly in the future. :)

 

Edited by Bermudacat

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I don't believe Locktite, whatever its color will secure the sprocket to the counter shaft in such a manner as to prevent horizontal movement.

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I don't believe Locktite, whatever its color will secure the sprocket to the counter shaft in such a manner as to prevent horizontal movement.

You're absolutely correct. TT is in bed with Henkel and devised this whole elaborate story just to sell more 263.

The massive,earth rotating torque of the DRZ is the reason the bolt comes loose, plain and simple.
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So that's why it has been so hot here this summer, the massive earth rotating torque of the DRZ!

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You would have a better shot at doing this using JB Weld and I don't think that would work either.

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51 minutes ago, GlennRay said:

I don't believe Locktite, whatever its color will secure the sprocket to the counter shaft in such a manner as to prevent horizontal movement.

I don't believe you have much knowledge on motorcycle maintenance, or strength of materials. :excuseme:

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15 minutes ago, Bermudacat said:

I don't believe you have much knowledge on motorcycle maintenance, or strength of materials. :excuseme:

Have fun and the best of luck to you.  Please post back up here and let us all know how well this "fix" works.

Edited by GlennRay

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