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High On Octane

Cased A 60' Tabletop - Video Now Added

70 posts in this topic

6 hours ago, High On Octane said:

The people who run the track actually watched the whole thing happen.  According to the owner, when my rear wheel hit the landing lip, the bike bounced me so hard it actually put me into a superman position, so I basically belly flopped off my bike when I came back down from the rebound.  Well, at least now I have a crazy crash video to submit to Fail Army. ?

Your video is another case of goPro from the rider doesn't show the whole story. When I watch the video I see that you almost save it and then it goes to fubar. Knowing that you went superman explains the change in the video aspect as the front washes out.

Why is it that you feel like you have no time to react when things are starting to go bad but then it seems like forever when you are flying through the air to think to yourself "this is not going to end well"... :lol:

Like you, I'm new to this. 1.5 years ago was first time I threw a leg over a dirt bike. I only ride track figuring that alone is bad enough. Soon to be 56. Here's one of me casing a step-up but getting lucky. LoL

 

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13 minutes ago, GoneDirtBikeN said:

Your video is another case of goPro from the rider doesn't show the whole story. When I watch the video I see that you almost save it and then it goes to fubar. Knowing that you went superman explains the change in the video aspect as the front washes out.

Why is it that you feel like you have no time to react when things are starting to go bad but then it seems like forever when you are flying through the air to think to yourself "this is not going to end well"... :lol:

Like you, I'm new to this. 1.5 years ago was first time I threw a leg over a dirt bike. I only ride track figuring that alone is bad enough. Soon to be 56. Here's one of me casing a step-up but getting lucky. LoL

 

That got the heart beating lol hey nothing against bark busters they work great for what thier for. But in motocross you could get you hand stuck during crash. Snap wrist even :thumbsdn: it's like going out there with a kickstand.  Just saying.  You're getting it done tho awesome job :thumbsup::thumbsup:

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41 minutes ago, GoneDirtBikeN said:

Your video is another case of goPro from the rider doesn't show the whole story. When I watch the video I see that you almost save it and then it goes to fubar. Knowing that you went superman explains the change in the video aspect as the front washes out.

Why is it that you feel like you have no time to react when things are starting to go bad but then it seems like forever when you are flying through the air to think to yourself "this is not going to end well"... :lol:

Like you, I'm new to this. 1.5 years ago was first time I threw a leg over a dirt bike. I only ride track figuring that alone is bad enough. Soon to be 56. Here's one of me casing a step-up but getting lucky. LoL

 

Man, I wish that's how my jump ended.  :facepalm:  I've always been hesitant to hit the throttle during a landing because I looped out bad one time on my 125.  Obviously it works tho. 

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Here's the video as promised, complete with slo-mo.  I think I may have actually gotten knocked for a couple of seconds after hitting the dirt.  I knew yesterday I had bit my tongue a little, but today now that I'm home relaxing I noticed my right cheek is slightly bruised and my neck is stiff.  Also, in the vid, it looks like I go limp right after impact, then back to.
 
 

Send that on into moto madness, everybody loves seeing people case jumps!
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Something that lots of folks forget is proper technique in gripping the bike with your knees. Pointing your toes in slightly helps drastically in these situations. As others have noted, landing with the gas on will also reduce your chances of high siding yourself. In this case, it can be hard to do since you're right into a corner.

 

I've been riding for quite a while and rarely find myself on the ground. Had to my son at several MX camps where I don't ride but listen while he gets taught. It's a good reminder for me on the basics. I firmly believe it keeps me out of trouble by being positioned to avoid it the crash.

 

Finally, this looks like it could be a case of your suspension behaving incorrectly. Slowing your rebound down on shock can help with the "bounce" off a "short landing". Getting a front end tuck is indicative of either not enough compression control or springs that aren't heavy enough for your weight. Pure speculation on my part based on my own experiences over the years. I still find myself learning more about suspension reactions. The older I get, the more it matters. Proper springs are important!

 

You can never eliminate the crash unfortunately but between good body position and a correctly tuned suspension, you will reduce these sorts of occurrences significantly. I only mention this because you said this was your second year catching air on the bike. Ride safe man. Hope the sternum isn't cracked.

 

 

If you were knocked out, time for a new helmet!!!!!!!

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Someone on the Colorado Dirt Riders group on Facebook actually mentioned sanding it to Moto Madness, so I sent the Facebook link to them thru messenger.  Also, sent it to Fail Army.

 

And, yeah, I wouldn't be surprised if my front and rear springs are both all worm out and original.  Maybe I should try adjusting the clickers again, not sure where I have them set right now.

 

And I was actually thinking about my helmet yesterday.  I know you should replace after every impact, but I did land in really soft groomed dirt.  I'm going to pull the liner sometime soon and inspect the foam.  If I can see the foam deformed, I'll definitely be replacing.  And, I used to be really good about gripping the bike with my knees, maybe stupid street habits are carrying over that I'm not recognizing.

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Save up some money and get some lessons at the track, there is usually a good local guy that offers lessons at any track. They will give you a hand with suspension settings and teach you proper form. You will be amazed at how many close calls you can ride away from with proper form. Money well spent for any rider that wants to progress to the next level and do it while riding safer.

Sent from my SM-G900V using ThumperTalk mobile app

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Glad you didn't get hurt worse man! There have been a couple of similar sized tables that I have come up a little short on like you did, minus the crash.

Pretty much clamping on with your legs, aligning your balance as straight as possible, and landing on the throttle are what will help save you.

With a landing like that the bike will only land for a brief moment before it hops down the backside of the table. In that oh shit moment you want to try to power the bike forward and keep the momentum up as best you can...or you get tossed.
Just my observations, best of luck.

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Good to be young! I separated ribs from sternum going chest first into the bar ends, and dislocated my shoulders, concussion (was out for 30 minutes), doc said if I had not had my compression suit on it would of pushed the ribs through the ...dead. Physical therapy for shoulders, neck and everything else has been helping 4 months now, and I can't wait to ride again!

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Yeah definitely going to remember all that I have learned thru this post for the crash.

 

And I just got message back from Moto Madness.  They are definitely using my footage in the next crash edit.  Haha

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9 hours ago, CMDR Oblivious said:

Something that lots of folks forget is proper technique in gripping the bike with your knees. Pointing your toes in slightly helps drastically in these situations.

I agree.  I had a pretty bad crash last week that probably wouldn't have happened had I been gripping the bike properly.  Thank goodness for the Fox Raptor protector - I probably would have done very serious damage to my ribs / chest / back / lungs / etc without it.  I still had the wind knocked out of me and bruised my ribs badly, but it could have been a LOT worse.

I wound up over-jumping a table which went right into an steep up/down section.  Because I wasn't gripping the bike properly, I got tossed forward and to the ground on the "down" section.  My bike must have landed on me at some point because it wasn't damaged at all :D.

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Ouch!! Glad you're ok. We've all done it at some point. There were some good follow up posts here already so I won't repeat them. You'll probably be a better rider after learning from this crash as long as you stay with it.

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56 minutes ago, JohnnyB24 said:

Ouch!! Glad you're ok. We've all done it at some point. There were some good follow up posts here already so I won't repeat them. You'll probably be a better rider after learning from this crash as long as you stay with it.

Most of my major improvements were made because of a crash ha ha!

Three years ago I hit some rough terrain leading up to a double.  Instead of staying on the throttle, I backed off and wound up coming up short, going over the bars, and completely tearing my rotator cuff.  Since then, I've encountered similar situations and have always kept on the gas and made it safely over.

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damn, i rode that track a month ago, looked to me like you were going fast enough for that jump. prolly only 30 ft across there.  Hope you are healed up for the race a buddy and I are promoting there in August. 

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2 hours ago, kxjim said:

damn, i rode that track a month ago, looked to me like you were going fast enough for that jump. prolly only 30 ft across there.  Hope you are healed up for the race a buddy and I are promoting there in August. 

What race is that?

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Posted (edited)

Coming up short wasn't your problem as much as the fact that your rear end swung to your left a little bit. When your front clears the knuckle but the rear doesn't with your back end kicked out to the left, the rear of the bike rebounds to the right. The front stays relatively strait but the back end swings, you crank the bars to the right trying to save it but get ejected to the left when the bike straitens and stands up.  In those situations your better off landing front wheel first so there is still a chance the front will follow the back and reduce the swap. Had you jumped strait you probably would have been fine.

Edited by temporarily_locked
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I've jumped a massive wall jump and flat landing it, thought I broke my sternum, but it was just bruised. If I had to guess I'd say yours is also just bruised.

 

 

 

 

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Welp :(   Spending a late night at the ER because I'm not getting any better. Xrays showed my sternum is completely broken, but luckily not displaced.  I guess it's bad enough that they chose to do a CT scan of both my chest and head.  Apparently I've been down playing my injuries and should have come in right away when it happened. 

 

At one point the doctor comes in to get the story.  She immediately recognized me from when I crashed into a mailbox on my drift trike last year.  I had a bruise on my inner left thigh the size of a football.  3 different nurses commented on how it was the worst contusion they'd ever seen.  One thing is for sure, when I crash, I crash epic.

 

Well, this hospital bill is going to bankrupt me.  If only I had known that throttling out would have saved my ass.  I freaking know it works too, I do it all the time while cornering.  Some things you have to learn the hard way I guess.  

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Hate to hear that. Riding dirt bikes is never a case of "if you crash". It is however a case of "when you crash" and how bad it is. Spend a few bucks on a local pro and get some basic lessons. Motorcycle control is substantially improved with correct body positioning and techniques. The sooner you build the habits, the safer (very relative riding MX) you will be.

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