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Gear oil for my Beta 300RR 2017

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30 minutes ago, shrubitup said:

any 10W40 is fine

 

10w-40 motorcycle oil, which is what you meant I assume.  I have used MTL and usually use rotella.  I noticed no difference between the 2 and change it so often I doubt it matters.

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10w-40 motorcycle oil, which is what you meant I assume.  I have used MTL and usually use rotella.  I noticed no difference between the 2 and change it so often I doubt it matters.

This particular viscosity does not have friction modifiers, is not energy conserving, etc so even car oils in this viscosity are fine.
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2 hours ago, shrubitup said:


This particular viscosity does not have friction modifiers, is not energy conserving, etc so even car oils in this viscosity are fine.

Never knew that.   I have just mainly used rotella cause its reasonably priced and i know it works.

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Rotella T6. $21 for a gallon at Home Depot. Cheapest place I have found it

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Dino rotella as recommended by Rekluse.

No longer recommended by Rekluse. At least they don't say so anymore.

 

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I used to use the rotella or cheap oil, but I've had better luck with dedicated gear oil like Bel Ray gear saver, Motul, Castrol, and Amsoil. With the cheap stuff my shifting would get chunky on a long weekend of riding with a lot of false neutrals. The dedicated dirt bike gear oil seems to shift smoother and last longer for me. I use the clutch a lot though.

 

I think it's funny that people will try and save money on oil and change it after every ride or every other ride. I get a quart of Amsoil dirt bike trans oil for $7-$8 and keep it in for 20-30 hours. Rotella went up in price to about $5 a quart. You aren't saving money and you are spending a lot of time changing the oil. Not worth it for crappy performance.

 

Everyone will have their opinion, but you should try a couple and see what gives you the best results.

 

 

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I used rotella for a long long time. Thought it was great oil, in till I tried this. I could really tell a difference in shifting.20170706_194838.jpg

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1 hour ago, David C said:

I used rotella for a long long time. Thought it was great oil, in till I tried this. I could really tell a difference in shifting.20170706_194838.jpg

+1, good stuff.  Started using it last year, clutch feels great.

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No longer recommended by Rekluse. At least they don't say so anymore.

 

Well the engineer who actually designed the radius x clutch told me that a few months ago. Plus it isnt cheap oil.

Waste your money on expensive sucker snake oil, I will stay with what is proven and works.

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On 7/5/2017 at 4:43 PM, hawaiidirtrider said:

I get the walmart supertech .. change it so often anyway.. like every ride or every other ride  depending.

Didn't know Supertec had a 10-40

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On 7/7/2017 at 4:46 AM, BassMan said:

Well the engineer who actually designed the radius x clutch told me that a few months ago. Plus it isnt cheap oil.

Waste your money on expensive sucker snake oil, I will stay with what is proven and works.

If you think group-3 oil has any purpose in a modern engine, you must think a  back-hoe and a KTM are essentially the same technology.

I would NEVER use Rotella in anything that I own after trying it in a comparison in 3 different bikes.  All of them shifted harder, and ran hotter.

Rotella has been proven to have less heat cycle stamina than just about any Group-4 oil on the planet.....

There is a reason why Amsoil was barred from including any Rotella T products from their oil test comparisons.....becuase Shell threatened to sue them if they did....

Try and find a test comparison of Rotella T-4 heat cycle durability......you won't find one.... and if you do, it's for (1) 20 hour cycle only.....and it's just pictures of wear, no psi tests......

 

 

Edited by KRAYNIAL

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3 minutes ago, KRAYNIAL said:

There is a reason why Amsoil was barred from including any Rotella T products from their oil test comparisons....

Not so Quick there Cowboy! 

T-6 is a Group 4 synthetic. 

As for Anyway oil, they sure do embellish their own products. 

Funny how they won't publish their specification on the internet.  You must register and then download the pdfs. 

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7 minutes ago, Beta300recat said:

Not so Quick there Cowboy! 

T-6 is a Group 4 synthetic. 

As for Anyway oil, they sure do embellish their own products. 

Funny how they won't publish their specification on the internet.  You must register and then download the pdfs. 

Er, no.  It's group III.

I offer a side note regarding Shell's Rotella T6 formerly known as Shell Rotella T synthetic. The group III base oil is a hydrocracked slack wax oil which further refines it beyond a group III synthetic but cannot qualify as a group IV as group IV begins life as synthetic rather than having it's chemical properties changed and realigned to be a synthetic which is what group IIIs are. That being said, Shell's crack (pardon the pun) at making a group III are beyond what others are doing to the point that Ferrari's F1 motors are run with this group III base stock with of course different additives based on what track they are running. Point being, it's good stuff and the T6 formula is great for our early Ferrari's however I would not recommend it for the newer stuff with cats.

-----------

Types
Synthetic Base Stocks

Synthetic motor oils are man made oils from the following classes of lubricants:

Polyalphaolefin (PAO) = American Petroleum Institute (API) Group IV base oil
Synthetic esters, etc. = API Group V base oils (non-PAO synthetics, including diesters, polyolesters, alklylated napthlenes, alkyklated benzenes, etc.)
Hydrocracked/Hydroisomerized = API Group III base oils. Chevron, Shell, and other petrochemical companies developed processes involving catalytic conversion of feed stocks under pressure in the presence of hydrogen into high-quality mineral lubricating oil. In 2005, production of GTL (gas-to-liquid) Group III base stocks began, the best of which perform much like polyalphaolefin. Group III-base stocks are widely permitted to be marketed as synthetic motor oil with few exceptions where they are not allowed to be marketed as "synthetic" (for example, Germany).

Semi-synthetic oil

Semi-synthetic oils (also called 'synthetic blends') are blends of mineral oil with no more than 30% synthetic oil. Designed to have many of the benefits of synthetic oil without matching the cost of pure synthetic oil. Motul introduced the first semi-synthetic motor oil in 1966.[14]

 

 

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