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Crf230f rear brake not working well?

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I recently cleaned up the drum and put in new EBC grooved brake shoes but they the rear brakes just don't seem to be working as well as they should.  When using the brake it seems like I have to push down and down on the pedal and it hardly grabs and when I get to a certain point the rear wheel locks up.  Is there no middle ground with drum brakes, there isn't any feedback like the front disc?  This is the first bike I've had with a drum brake so maybe I'm expecting too much?  I have read that many people like and prefer the rear drum brake on their crf230 which is why I think mine could be better.  

Is it okay to adjust the rear brake so the shoes make slight contact when not braking?  It would make it easier to use so I wouldn't have to push the pedal down so far to brake.  Would they get to hot?  My manual only says to adjust the freeplay and to find the point where you start feeling resistance but I'll be damned if I can find that point lol.

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I've never had any problems like this with mine.  just the typical things to check, is the drum surface flat, are the shoe and drum surfaces clean?  yes running them touching will create heat and friction until they wear, not recommended.  Something is not right if they do not work, you should easily be able to lock it up on loose surface.

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NEODS, thank you for the response.  Before I put the new brake shoes on I made sure to clean the drum surface with steel wool and wore gloves when handling the shoes so there shouldn't be anything at all on them.  The brake does work because I can lock the rear wheel right up if I'm trying to, it's just that it doesn't give nearly the same amount of feedback as the front disc does.  Is this normal?  With the front brake I can tell how much brake I am using just by feel but with the rear I can't.  I end up just using more brake until the rear wheel locks.  Maybe it's just a case of needing to get used to it.   I may try to find a set of softer shoes to try even if they do wear quicker.

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Yeah, I have it adjusted in as much as I can.  One more turn in and the shoes will make contact...

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The new shoes need to seat it first, they feel weird till this happens. Also it helps if you loosen axle then stand on the brakes while you tighten axle back up, this helps center the shoes for optimum contact. I also put a Hammerhead forged aluminum brake pedal on mine. It has less flex than the factory one thus giving you more feel. It's still mushy but with feel. Still it's a drum brake, some of us grew up with nothing but drums, front and rear, so we are just happy as clams to have a disc on the front.

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I will be adjusting my chain this afternoon so I will try standing on the rear brake while I tighten the axle.  I never got to feel how well the oem brake shoes worked.  

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Drum brakes at their best are vague and mushy.... Feedback is terrible...they will lock the rear wheel, but between off and locked there is a lot of guessing...

I grew up with them .... Hated them always... Didn't miss them at all when they left ...and hate the one on my 230...

That about sums up drum brakes for me

 

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Drum brakes at their best are vague and mushy.... Feedback is terrible...they will lock the rear wheel, but between off and locked there is a lot of guessing...
I grew up with them .... Hated them always... Didn't miss them at all when they left ...and hate the one on my 230...
That about sums up drum brakes for me
 


Lol:
Well at 9.999 -1 compression ratio, no wonder

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1 hour ago, adnohguy said:

 


Lol:
Well at 9.999 -1 compression ratio, no wonder

 

Nobody in the history of the world has ever engineered the removal of a disc to install a drum... But across all motorsports there are kits that swap out drums for discs... So I'm guessing im not alone in my hatred of drums...

You really got it in for me today!!

You are only considering static compression of my little bunny foo foo , not dynamic cylinder fill ... Same way you don't judge a turbo engine by compression... Since they produce more cranking psi through charge volume...

Bunny is more like just under diesel pressures when you consider the porting and  intake and exhaust harmonics factored in....😀😎

Edited by mixxer
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Nobody in the history of the world has ever engineered the removal of a disc to install a drum... But across all motorsports there are kits that swap out drums for discs... So I'm guessing im not alone in my hatred of drums...
You really got it in for me today!!
You are only considering static compression of my little bunny foo foo , not dynamic cylinder fill ... Same way you don't judge a turbo engine by compression... Since they produce more cranking psi through charge volume...
Bunny is more like just under diesel pressures when you consider the porting and  intake and exhaust harmonics factored in....


Yeah, well every time I try to work out a deal to get one of those "diesel" heads for my 277 so I can Bragg a little also, it seems like they are always "unubtainium"

What do I gots to do.....
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46 minutes ago, adnohguy said:

 


Yeah, well every time I try to work out a deal to get one of those "diesel" heads for my 277 so I can Bragg a little also, it seems like they are always "unubtainium"

What do I gots to do.....emoji15.pngemoji848.pngemoji15.pngemoji848.pngemoji15.pngemoji848.png

 

Guy, you know I really do want to port a head for you... It's true...

I'm certain I can make almost any port work at it's best efficiency for a given carb / valve combo....  I have always informed anyone who would listen that you can do all the mods you do to an engine be a better "air pump" ... Exhaust/cams/carbs/displacement/compression... All the good stuff...

But since ALL those things need to breathe through the ports... ALL of them are handicapped from their true potential if the port isn't right....  Make the porting right and EVERYTHING pulls harder...

I have a collection of porting tools having evolved over for about 40 years.... I can do whatever can be done to any port I want... And I'm pretty good with epoxy when a port shape or volume isn't condusive to flow... Not bragging... Just what it is...

But what I don't have is a serdi or other top end setup for doing more involved valve projects...

I have a collection of NeWay valve equipment and have a bench setup for valve work... I also have the NeWay motor drive for the cutters.... And it all works great for cutting efficient flowing multi angle valve seats... And it works fine for cutting 1 or 2mm oversize seats if the original seats are dimensioned to allow....it just takes quite a bit longer to move a lot of material...

But I don't have the capability to cut and install oversize seats... And cutting big valves and sinking seats lower to account for added overlap valve to valve clearance with big cams... Is out of the comfort zone for the equipment I have...

I have the pushers and guide reamers for the 450 4 valve thumpers , but not for much else....

Your builds are pretty much outer limits and while the ports and seat cutting up to 2mm over isn't a problem, I just don't have what is needed to to the short guides and oversize seats and oversize sunken valves to do your big bore big cam stroker engine setups....

Sad as it is....

Edited by mixxer
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All apologies to the OP for the thread hijack...!

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Guy, you know I really do want to port a head for you... It's true...

I'm certain I can make almost any port work at it's best efficiency for a given carb / valve combo....  I have always informed anyone who would listen that you can do all the mods you do to an engine be a better "air pump" ... Exhaust/cams/carbs/displacement/compression... All the good stuff...

But since ALL those things need to breathe through the ports... ALL of them are handicapped from their true potential if the port isn't right....  Make the porting right and EVERYTHING pulls harder...

I have a collection of porting tools having evolved over for about 40 years.... I can do whatever can be done to any port I want... And I'm pretty good with epoxy when a port shape or volume isn't condusive to flow... Not bragging... Just what it is...

But what I don't have is a serdi or other top end setup for doing more involved valve projects...

I have a collection of NeWay valve equipment and have a bench setup for valve work... I also have the NeWay motor drive for the cutters.... And it all works great for cutting efficient flowing multi angle valve seats... And it works fine for cutting 1 or 2mm oversize seats if the original seats are dimensioned to allow....it just takes quite a bit longer to move a lot of material...

But I don't have the capability to cut and install oversize seats... And cutting big valves and sinking seats lower to account for added overlap valve to valve clearance with big cams... Is out of the comfort zone for the equipment I have...

I have the pushers and guide reamers for the 450 4 valve thumpers , but not for much else....

Your builds are pretty much outer limits and while the ports and seat cutting up to 2mm over isn't a problem, I just don't have what is needed to to the short guides and oversize seats and oversize sunken valves to do your big bore big cam stroker engine setups....

Sad as it is....

 

 

I got a dream AND I got a plan.... to make it all worth it.... for both of us.... stay tuned.

 

 

But to keep on track with the Op's original intent,

You can add a disk brake and your rear brake will work fine. But you may know (or not?) that the front brake provides AT LEAST 80% of your braking power.... my own bikes 95%.

 

If you have lots of $ (and time) for a rear disk set up, go for it.

But may I suggest, for the largest bang for the buck, simply add more compression, for the cost, it's probably, depends on what you pay for parts and how much is your time worth, double the smiles for the $ spent.....

O I C:

With more power, you need more brakes.......

 

Possibly, but shouldn't you really try it first,

 

Depends on your budget of course....

 

I agree, sorry for the high jack, but if you on a budget and could use some extra power, hopefully that you will at least consider your options.

 

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The rear brake isn't a huge issue for me, it's just crappy enough that I thought mine may not be working it's best but it sounds like the norm with drum brakes.  I do use engine braking and front brake the majority the time anyway.  I can't go fast enough yet with the stock suspension to need more brake power, I've almost been flipped over the handlebars twice already lol.

No worries on hijacking, I'll read anything.  :ride:

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