Do i Clutch when downshift?

Hey guys just got my bike today starting to learn how to ride, got kx250f just wondering do i have to use clutch when downshifting, im just worried about tranny i know you do when you come to tight corner and want to slow down, but in general do i have to thx help is appreciated :)

No.  Don't need to clutch on the upshift either.  Dirt isn't pavement, there is lots of room for tire slip.  No transmission damage will occur.

You talking crap you do have to use clutch when upshifting

You talking crap you do have to use clutch when upshifting

Your just learning to ride and you ask for advise then you tell someone their full of crap?

No you don't need the clutch for anything but taking off. Up shifts, downshifts doesn't make any difference, just let off the throttle and shift.

 

I never use the clutch when shifting up. If im going down 2 or more gears I will use it down shifting. 

You use the clutch for any form of shifting. If not, you'll likely end up destroying your bottom end.

Think of it as your grandpas old stick shift truck. Did he ever just whack the gear shift without hitting the clutch? No. You would've heard a very awful grinding noise.

Long story short is use your clutch for any type of shifting. If your unaware of what the purpose of a clutch is, I suggest you educate yourself before you go cranking your gears while in drive anymore.

No.  Don't need to clutch on the upshift either.  Dirt isn't pavement, there is lots of room for tire slip.  No transmission damage will occur.

You must be joking. While your clutch is connected with the drive plate, your gears are in motion and turning. To go upshift and yank a gear that's under tremendous torque out of drive and throw a new gear under that strain of your bikes motion is devastating. I've had too many bottom end rebuilds on bikes from idiots not clutching before shifting, I'd hate that to happen to you.
You talking crap you do have to use clutch when upshifting

Use the clutch on any shifting itll save you the hassle of an early expensive bottom end rebuild
11 minutes ago, Mr.mudman112 said:


You must be joking. While your clutch is connected with the drive plate, your gears are in motion and turning. To go upshift and yank a gear that's under tremendous torque out of drive and throw a new gear under that strain of your bikes motion is devastating. I've had too many bottom end rebuilds on bikes from idiots not clutching before shifting, I'd hate that to happen to you.

Roll the throttle off before shifting.  Zero strain on the transmission or driveline.  Its not rocket science.  Roadracers have been doing this for decades and their tires are firmly connected to pavement.  

After 30 years of riding I've never seen a damaged transmission from clutchless shifting.

If you learn to upshift properly, it is easier on your transmission to not use the clutch. Downshifting you should always use your clutch if you have any sort of speed. YMMV. :cool:

You must be joking. While your clutch is connected with the drive plate, your gears are in motion and turning. To go upshift and yank a gear that's under tremendous torque out of drive and throw a new gear under that strain of your bikes motion is devastating. I've had too many bottom end rebuilds on bikes from idiots not clutching before shifting, I'd hate that to happen to you.

Your transmission is turning weather you have the clutch pulled in or not.

Clutch just cuts torque from the out put shaft. Same as letting off the gas.

 

Roll the throttle off before shifting.  Zero strain on the transmission or driveline.  Its not rocket science.  Roadracers have been doing this for decades and their tires are firmly connected to pavement.  
After 30 years of riding I've never seen a damaged transmission from clutchless shifting.

I still wouldn't consider it healthy or beneficial for the bike. The clutch is there for a reason, and that reason is to separate your plates while shifting to relieve your gears of any motor torque.

If you sat in idle in your driveway and kicked into first with zero clutch use, your bike would die. Whys that any different at higher speeds/ RPMs??

That's it taking off other than that you don't need it.
Although it helps with wheelies and traction.

A beginner rider is  not 'going pro'. Ride slower, use the clutch, master technique and smoothness. Hit your apexes, master your line.

Going fast will happen when you master the basics. Doing the other way around will result in needless injuries.

I normally use my clutch for all shifting. I have shifted without a clutch and things were okay, but there have been times when I wasn't able to get into the gear or maybe I wasn't all the way in to the gear, pinned it, and then felt the bike shift back into the previous gear. I'm usually using the clutch through a corner at some point anyway, trying to keep the roll speed up.

see all this controversy over this issue? it because you have know 100% what your doing with 100% accuracy not to cause damage. the answer to your question is NO, if you know what your doing and can replicate the action exactly every single time. chances are your going to cause more wear and damage than if you just used your clutch.

38 minutes ago, Mr.mudman112 said:


I still wouldn't consider it healthy or beneficial for the bike. The clutch is there for a reason, and that reason is to separate your plates while shifting to relieve your gears of any motor torque.

If you sat in idle in your driveway and kicked into first with zero clutch use, your bike would die. Whys that any different at higher speeds/ RPMs??

Thats a silly comparison and has no relation to when the bike is moving.  

When the bike is moving, roll of the throttle to unload the transmission.  Make the shift under zero load, then roll on throttle again.  No stress at all.  Motorcycle transmissions are constant mesh design and are meant for this kind of use.

I run a Rekluse and for nearly 3 years have ridden prob close to 5000 kms off-road without hardly ever using the clutch.  That represents thousands upon thousands of clutchless shifts in both directions.

Thats a silly comparison and has no relation to when the bike is moving.  
When the bike is moving, roll of the throttle to unload the transmission.  Make the shift under zero load, then roll on throttle again.  No stress at all.  Motorcycle transmissions are constant mesh design and are meant for this kind of use.
I run a Rekluse and for nearly 3 years have ridden prob close to 5000 kms off-road without hardly ever using the clutch.  That represents thousands upon thousands of clutchless shifts in both directions.

.......isn't the Rekluse an automatic clutch?
Just now, Animatrix86 said:


.......isn't the Rekluse an automatic clutch?

A Rekluse only slips the clutch at low rpm.  As long as the motor is spinning, the clutch is fully engaged, just like any other.

2 minutes ago, Animatrix86 said:


.......isn't the Rekluse an automatic clutch?

yes but it doesn't do anything when shifting. your still suppose to use the clutch when shifting. all it does is disengage the clutch when the rpms go down near idle

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