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How does this plug look

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17 Ktm 250 xc
 
Elevation is 1000m. Temps are low. 20-30c. I think 60-80F?
 
Jd jet kit. 420. 32.5. Red needle. 3.5 clips. Plug chop. Here's the plug. How does it look?
 
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Looks &%$#@!in scary lean to me......But I don't know diddly squat about reading plugs.  I don't have the guts to run that lean.   My plugs are more dark tan to brown.  

Can you get a better shot looking down the electrode??

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It's got a bit of tan colour to it doesn't it? It's not pure grey/white. We followed the jd jet kit instructions perfectly

We can tomorrow. Plug is back in the bike and probably gonna get ran soon. Unless you guys suggest otherwise?

We googled it. Even the ngk sites saying it's pretty good.... I think

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She'll 91 octane and I'm not 100% sure what oil. Amsoil I believe. It's a friends bike. 50:1

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Would like to see down by the insulator better, but looks ok to me, seeing as it's a plug-chop.
The new 2017 motor seems to run cleaner/leaner/less gitchy than the previous motor. Not a scientific fact, just my observation...

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That plug is really too old and well used to get a proper plug read. See the NGK article linked above.

You need to look down inside the plug, where the white insulator meets the outer metal (threaded) shell. Look at the 1/8" or so (say 3mm) from the joint up the inside. You want the tan down there.

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It's not the little metal tab were supposed to be looking at? That's good to know. The plug has 16 hours on it

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No the earth strap tells you it has an earth strap. Go with Pat's thread. I think it looks ok for what you can see of the insulator.

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5 hours ago, cdf450 said:

It's not the little metal tab were supposed to be looking at? That's good to know. The plug has 16 hours on it

Here is a better in depth article.  http://www.dragstuff.com/techarticles/reading-spark-plugs.html as it says "The area you are interested in is that third that is all the way up inside the plug where the sun don't shine."

The ground strap is useless for this. And the photos in the NGK article are not very good. You do not care about the tip of the electrode. You care about the joint between the outer shell and the insulation cone. In the "Dragstuff" article, they cut a plug apart so you can see the 1/8" that you care about.

16 hours is at least 15 1/2 hours too much time.

 

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hmm, very interesting. a lot of it way above my head though!  id bet im the only person in my life that now knows what part to look at on a spark plug now haha.

 

so what, you guys are buying cheap plugs by the dozen, and doing plug chops like mad?  start bike, idle for a bit, 1-2-3-4-5 WFO.  kill it.  check plug, adjust, brand new plug, and repeat?  up to 6+ times??

Edited by cdf450

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1 hour ago, cdf450 said:

so what, you guys are buying cheap plugs by the dozen, and doing plug chops like mad?  start bike, idle for a bit, 1-2-3-4-5 WFO.  kill it.  check plug, adjust, brand new plug, and repeat?  up to 6+ times??

No, never idle. Start, put it in gear, ride gently until its warmed up, then blast and chop. Jet. Repeat every practice session.

When I was road racing, we went thru a ton of expensive plugs. At least at the AMA Pro races, Champion gave us plugs, but at club races, plugs were like tires and premix, expendables.

We would rejet after every practice session. But road racing tunes for the sharpest edge. In the woods, its not as fine a tune. I bet I don't run WFO more than 1% of the time I'm in the woods. At a track like Daytona, you are WFO and shifting at red-line anytime you are not actively going around a corner. So 90% of a lap is WFO.

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