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Jumping logs / obstacles... 1st or 2nd gear?!

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Just curious what you guys do. I almost never use 1st gear on my 250RR (same went for my yZ250fx). I clear logs, step ups and other obstacles almost always in 2nd. It's pretty split amongst my buddies. A lot always down shift to 1st, others to 2nd. Obviously the bike can have an influence on this. However, some of my 1st gear buddies are on 300s or big thumpers. I have always found it more controlled in 2nd and easy to bring the front end up. Anyways, let me know what you guys do in general.

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Depends on the circumstances, 2nd unless it's at crawl speed tight. 1st gear on a YZ250 in the woods can be a device of the devil, I try to avoid using it any more than I just have to.

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If going slow, like walking pace and need to keep speed down, 1st all the way. 2nd works well though and in some cases better. But for logs taller than the  available ground clearance approached slowly, 1st.

Depends on the log and the ground really. If traxion sucks 1st can be a waste of time too so you have to consider that.

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5 hours ago, BushPig said:

If going slow, like walking pace and need to keep speed down, 1st all the way. 2nd works well though and in some cases better. But for logs taller than the  available ground clearance approached slowly, 1st.

Depends on the log and the ground really. If traxion sucks 1st can be a waste of time too so you have to consider that.

Yup, same here

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Depends on how big. 2' or less, I do not do anything other than go over. Over 2', I have to consider if I hit it with the skid plate, will I damage anything or crash. 3'? I rides trial style over it. Nothing manly about crushing a frame or breaking my neck.

 

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17 minutes ago, William1 said:

Depends on how big. 2' or less, I do not do anything other than go over. Over 2', I have to consider if I hit it with the skid plate, will I damage anything or crash. 3'? I rides trial style over it. Nothing manly about crushing a frame or breaking my neck.

 

you cant just ride over a log that's as tall as your front tire.

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4 minutes ago, 91kdx25088 said:

you cant just ride over a log that's as tall as your front tire.

Sure you can. My comfort limit is about 24". But you have to lift as you make contact. Then when the back tire touches, throw your weight forward and gas it over. More than that, I consider alternative paths.. If the angle of attack is too step, then the technique changes from riding over to more like in the video or trials. Neither of which I am any good at anymore.

Skid plates are also known  as glide plates. Not bash plates ;) There is a reason for wanting them flat and smooth.

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Watch hard Enduro cross training skills on you tube they cover this in detail and with pro riders! great stuff

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I have a Rekluse so I need to use first otherwise the clutch slips too much and doesn't give me the drive needed to clear the log.

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Definitely depends on the situation. For instance, hard right turn into a large log I'll use 1st on my 450. Now if it's a long straight blocked by a large tree down then I'll cruise up in second and let it rip

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My log crossing game is the worst of all my poorly learned techniques of 27 years of riding. Generally I know that first gear is too slow and I'll always hang up the rear tire, so I almost hit things in second. I loft the front, and hope I have enough momentum to carry the rear, hold on for dear life, and hope I stay on the bike. 

 

Easier for me to do with two strokes than four. 

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As in most things, there's more than one way to do it:

Although they all share common techniques, the choice of gear depends on the circumstances and technique used.

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