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Less expensive steering bearing DIY

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Writing this so someone won't have to chew up their frame with screwdrivers and dremels or spend hundreds on rarely used tools. This is only what worked on my <10,000 mile bike, and I'm far from a mechanic, so take it FWIW.

A 27mm socket on an extension outperformed everything else in my garage for punching the lower race out. Mine was a deep socket, but I doubt it matters. It seemed to work for the top race too, but mine was so clean I didn't bother.

You'll need a way to flatten the top of the socket...I used an angle grinder. The idea is to have 90 degree flat surfaces on the contacting corner of the socket because the top of the race has almost no exposed area to press on. Tap on one side of the race at a time, keeping pressure on the side of the extension while you hit it.

My 36mm socket worked almost perfectly for pressing the new race in. Take your time and observe which end needs more pressure as you hammer it in. No grinding required.

For the race on the neck of the triple, I did exactly as this video shows from the 4:50 to 10:00 marks. 

If you are in a hurry, amazon has a Pivot Works kit with their fast prime shipping. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GU0N4C/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

5900840239752575541.jpg

Edited by His Dudeness

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At what interval do you guys do this? Just when your steering gets shitty?

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Ew, grody. I heard the steering lock can let moisture into the steering column! Pretty shitty design imo.

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Almost every part on the bike is a fixable shitty design

If I could do it over, I'd buy my DRZ from TT and partzilla.

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There is a seal there. The engineers have to walk a fine line between designing an adequate seal and not added to much drag. That pivot, like the linkage, needs to be disassembled periodically, cleaned and lubricated.

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Thoughts on drilling and tapping for a zerk fitting?

Edited by robb5

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1 hour ago, robb5 said:

Thoughts on drilling and tapping for a zerk fitting?

Whole lot of work. You need to disassemble and clean really well after drilling and tapping.  I'd rather just wipe the old grease out and re-assemble with a butt-load of new grease.

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Greasing the steering stem bearings is a 45min job.  

Setting the proper torque on the stem nut is the most difficult part of that job.  

It only took me two tries at getting it right.  

Too loose and it gets a little bit of headshake at high speeds.  

Too tight and it sort of wanders at low speed.  

If there is only the slightest amount of low speed wander initially, once the grease heats up (from the exhaust and rads), it flows and the steering loosens up a bit.

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If you're just regreasing it's quick and easy...but I'd guess a lot of dirt models need replacement like mine did.

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Nothing on the DRZ comes from the factory with a lot of grease. If your headset seemed in bad shape, it might be a good idea to check your swingarm and pivot bearings.

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17 minutes ago, Bermudacat said:

Nothing on the DRZ comes from the factory with a lot of grease. If your headset seemed in bad shape, it might be a good idea to check your swingarm and pivot bearings.

Had to replace those as well. Before I reinstall...should they be caked in grease or will a light coating work? What about the external areas?

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