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what spare parts would you take for longer trip on your exc?

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if any?  Things come to mind like fuel/water pumps, stator, regulator, clutch plates, engine maybe ;)

Not talking here about normal stuff like levers, sparks, tubes etc.

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I would think oil/filters and air filter cleaning stuff would be good unless you're headed for the southern tip of South America or something. In most places in the US, you can probably find parts nearby. I guess part of it just depends on how patient your riding group is -- would they be willing to drive over to the nearest dealership to look for a fuel pump if your bike broke down? If you're headed out into the deep wilderness, then the list may get a bit longer.

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I guess that it would depend on how "long" of a trip you're taking. 

I've never actually dual sported mine for a long distance of say, 2000 miles, but I would think unless I was going to the remotest parts of Africa, I wouldn't take any of the things you listed.  As long as I can call someone, or be close to some kind of civilization, I'm relying on making phone calls when I'm down, and getting parts shipped in as needed.

Things like a stator, clutch plates, water pump, are just not going to go "out" on you during the normal course of riding, I wouldn't think.  Maybe you put all new clutch plates in before you start and call it a day.

If was going to carry any spare engine parts, the only things I can think of are plugs and maybe an injector.

Again, I've never gone a "long" distance, so I don't know really what would/does break...

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Furthest I've done on my 500exc was about a 1000 miles on an annual ptrip through Colorado, over about a week and a half. I bring standard trail side repair stuff, but as far as extra parts, only a spare wheel that stays in town just in case I crack a rim. I usually do a service before the trip starts though. Unless you know how to install all the parts you mentioned, and have someway to transport them with you everywhere you go, they don't do any good.

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7 minutes ago, johnrunner89 said:

Furthest I've done on my 500exc was about a 1000 miles on an annual ptrip through Colorado, over about a week and a half. I bring standard trail side repair stuff, but as far as extra parts, only a spare wheel that stays in town just in case I crack a rim. I usually do a service before the trip starts though. Unless you know how to install all the parts you mentioned, and have someway to transport them with you everywhere you go, they don't do any good.

Even IF you knew how to install the parts, it would take a crap ton of "special" tools to change something like clutch plates.  While it's true that the plates themselves actually weigh next to nothing, I don't want to be carting the extra tools around, unless it's just absolutely necessary...

Edited by cadman_ks

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2 hours ago, cadman_ks said:

Even IF you knew how to install the parts, it would take a crap ton of "special" tools to change something like clutch plates.  While it's true that the plates themselves actually weigh next to nothing, I don't want to be carting the extra tools around, unless it's just absolutely necessary...

oh come on, what special tools you need to change clutch plates??? none. Regular socket wrenches which I carry anyway.

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3 minutes ago, motf said:

oh come on, what special tools you need to change clutch plates??? none. Regular socket wrenches which I carry anyway.

A big socket, a breaker bar, a chisel (suppose a screwdriver would work), a hammer, and something to keep the basket from spinning, preferably not a screwdriver, because they like to break baskets.

In the end, I just don't see a clutch going out on you when you're mostly road riding.  If it's engaging properly, it's not going to prematurely wear itself out.  As a point of reference, I have a Rekluse in my bike, so I'm CONSTANTLY slipping the clutch hard, because of the nature of the way that it works.  I had about 4000 miles on my discs, and I thought that my clutch was slipping, so I ordered new ones expecting to change them.  I took them out, and they were still about the same thickness they were when new.  I now have somewhere around 7,000 miles on those same disks, and they don't need to be changed anytime soon.

The point in all of that is that if you're going to go on a long road trip, there's going to be a lot of extra stuff that you're going to NEED take:  fuel, water, clothes, chargers, phones, computers (possibly), toiletries, food, tents, the stuff that YOU need to survive.  By taking a lot of extra stuff that you could get by without, at some point you're going to need to sacrifice the stuff that you really need.

YMMV... ;)

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credit card and a phone, nothing worse they carrying a bunch of heavy tools, and fixing stuff on the side of the road.

Years back I rode my DRZ 1500 miles carrying a back pack full of tools, it sucked, on the way back I left that stuff, and was much nicer, not having that stuff on my back.

I know some dress up like a chuck wagon, but I prefer light as possible, a lot more enjoyable.

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20 minutes ago, Spud786 said:

credit card and a phone, nothing worse they carrying a bunch of heavy tools, and fixing stuff on the side of the road.

 

 

credit card and a phone you say?  LOL

 

maxresdefault.jpg

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Wolfman saddle bags for all the crap and an ACR or Spot satellite safety beacon.

 

Theres stuff that goes on U and the bike, and then there's stuff that goes in the truck or trailer back at base camp.

 

Carry a roll of Benjamins to help motivate local assistance too.

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Keep records on the bike and service it before a ride. 

  • Usually replace bearings, chain, tires, HD tubes, Chk rear sprocket & replace front sprocket for desert riding every year.
  • Carb bike is easy, Injector I think will run 2 yrs, send to Melkman for computer check & ultrasonic testing & see how bad it's clogged. Then put it on a service check or replacement schedule. Fuel pump replacement - Don't know - 3 yrs as a maintenance item? Neither are field serviceable I reckon.
  • Run a Twin-air dust cover and it will keep the primary filter clean for 700-1000 miles depending on rider distances. 
  • LIPO battery - run it up to 3 yrs if it hits the voltage marks for full charging. Install volt meter to track it full time.
  • Smart phone and in-reach would be great. I have SPOT, but it doesn't pick up in the woods all the time. Even in Death Valley the rangers advised there would be transmission delays for a satellite transfer due to terrain. I was looking at the sun as it burned down mid-day thinking how can that be possible? If my Garmin starts drawing straight lines point A to B, then tracks trail perfectly on refresh, I know the SPOT is missing some track points in that part of the ride.
  • Fuses are good. New bikes use the small relays under the battery box- cheap & small to carry. Extra in-line filters, FI hose & FI hose clamps
  • Fuel transfer on an FI bike? I carry 3 ft of 1/4" tubing & a 3/4 oz syringe. One suck/pull and it takes gas from the cap easy enough.

My 4-7 day gear is 30-35 lbs. I carry the fuel cell for an extra gallon if needed on the new bike. the 450 has the 6.6 which is never filled up unless we cross the Black Rock Desert north to south. Lots of glues, bolts, rad hose & fix-it stuff. 

If your bike suspension is set up proper for 4 gallons / 30 lbs camp gear, it will ride like a dirt bike. If you crank down on soft springs and compression setting to compensate, it will beat the hell out of you while on the ride, and after you get home.

Edited by Burnrider
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