Jump to content

Beta send out supension

Recommended Posts

Looks like Beta has send in suspension services:  http://betausa.com/content/beta-suspension

I could never understand how these kind of things work by simply sending out a form with rider info and your components. All the way back to my XR600 I always have guys tune my suspension that actually ride the same stuff I do. 

Other point is why would you have the suspension re-valved on a new bike you have never ridden. The only thing needed to a good start of tuning process is proper springs, setting sag, and a good combination of clicker adjustments. I did just that on my Beta and was really pleased with the results. My rule is ride at least one full season with nothing more than oil change on the forks before even thinking about valving. After 25 to 50hrs you will really have a good idea of what you need for all the different riding conditions.

I am fully aware of how controversial this is. OTOH, I'm sure there are a bunch of guys like me that can't afford to dump 1000 bucks into components that in reality only give you questionable gains.

Just ask Bill (Krannie) how happy he was with his very expensive "Factory Beta" suspension tune on his new bike. I'm pretty sure he had to send it back a time or two before it was right. After riding mine for a few seasons I rode a Beta from Get Dirties steed that was amazing. I had Dave tune mine just like his. The only thing done different to mine was some tighter, more restrictive valving for the days I have my bike bagged up. FWIW my Beta was valved perfect 1st time around just like the rest of my bikes.

Here is a thread I started after I got my Beta. I spent a full afternoon with my wife documenting settings and riding the same stuff over and over. Since I don't race anymore a stop watch was not used. These days my settings are for comfort not speed. The cool thing with clickers is if you want more speed you simply tighten up the high speed rebound knob a few clicks on shock. In deep sand wash days or dunes I tighten everything at least 3-4 clicks.

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know guys that buy a bike, never touch a clicker and then send their stuff out because it sucks. I usually spring for my fat self then can generally tell in 5 - 10 hours exactly what I want to fix. 25 to 50 hours is just punishing myself!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ride the rocks in Eastern Pa. I have Donny Lingle do the suspension on my KTM350 after I rode it for 6 months. It was night and day.  When I purchased my Beta 300 I sent the suspension to Donny before I rode the bike.  Based on my KTM, why suffer, get it done right.  

rgksr

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with all the above posts including Rgksr.  If you have a trusted tuner, you're confident you'll get predictably good results, and you know that you'll eventually hand over the components to a tuner, why not just do it from day 1.  If you don't have all that, you're wasting your money unless you have a good idea WHY you are sending the suspension to a tuner.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ballisticexchris said:

Looks like Beta has send in suspension services:  http://betausa.com/content/beta-suspension

I could never understand how these kind of things work by simply sending out a form with rider info and your components. All the way back to my XR600 I always have guys tune my suspension that actually ride the same stuff I do. 

Other point is why would you have the suspension re-valved on a new bike you have never ridden. The only thing needed to a good start of tuning process is proper springs, setting sag, and a good combination of clicker adjustments. I did just that on my Beta and was really pleased with the results. My rule is ride at least one full season with nothing more than oil change on the forks before even thinking about valving. After 25 to 50hrs you will really have a good idea of what you need for all the different riding conditions.

I am fully aware of how controversial this is. OTOH, I'm sure there are a bunch of guys like me that can't afford to dump 1000 bucks into components that in reality only give you questionable gains.

Just ask Bill (Krannie) how happy he was with his very expensive "Factory Beta" suspension tune on his new bike. I'm pretty sure he had to send it back a time or two before it was right. After riding mine for a few seasons I rode a Beta from Get Dirties steed that was amazing. I had Dave tune mine just like his. The only thing done different to mine was some tighter, more restrictive valving for the days I have my bike bagged up. FWIW my Beta was valved perfect 1st time around just like the rest of my bikes.

Here is a thread I started after I got my Beta. I spent a full afternoon with my wife documenting settings and riding the same stuff over and over. Since I don't race anymore a stop watch was not used. These days my settings are for comfort not speed. The cool thing with clickers is if you want more speed you simply tighten up the high speed rebound knob a few clicks on shock. In deep sand wash days or dunes I tighten everything at least 3-4 clicks.

 

 

The best suspension you know is the suspension you are riding with now. 

Imagine if shoes only came in small, medium and large. You would have no idea of the difference buying shoes that would eliminate back pain, blisters, corns, bunions, etc.....

I experienced failure to perform from Beta with my BYOB 'support' suspension upgrade. They admited they screwed up, and offered me a 'factory' suspension upgrade. They screwed that one up too. I did not want deal with them any more so I went somewhere else. They charged $289 for each end to modify the valving. It was much better.

A local suspension tuner and I were talking, and he told me had had just done a 300RR RE, and that RaceTech had provided him with their latest mods and shim stacks. To my understanding, that is what the race team uses. 

I tried it out, and it was a major  improvement, approaching KYB status.  Contact Brian at    http://www.n2-dirt.com/

To be fair, the 2015 Sach CC forks (on the 2016 BETAs) were crude in their execution. The ones provided now are much better now.

I think Beta was over-reaching on making everyone happy with BYOB custom suspension, and I would bet that I was not the only one who got less than they expected.

I think the announcment is basically saying 'ok, now were are serious about these provdiging real suspension options, so give us a try'.    

Sounds good.  Remember, NO OTHER BRAND comes even close when it comes to offering real concrete options for bike tuning, direct from the factory. 

To me, riding stock suspension is exactly like trying to wear someone elses shoes.............. 

 

 

Edited by THE KRAN
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, bryanaverill said:

I agree with all the above posts including Rgksr.  If you have a trusted tuner, you're confident you'll get predictably good results, and you know that you'll eventually hand over the components to a tuner, why not just do it from day 1.  If you don't have all that, you're wasting your money unless you have a good idea WHY you are sending the suspension to a tuner.

Some times doing a suspension from day one starts one off not knowing the right direction.. and it's also different giving a different whole set of suspension sometimes to a tuner if they aren't familiar with sachs or marzocchi for ex.... I think the benefit of riding the bike first gives one an idea how much stiffer or softer or whatever one may want to go.  There's a frame of reference riding stock.. but if one is definitely heavier or lighter than the stock springs that come with the bike then I'd think  doing suspension right off might be a good idea.. Like you say the trusted tuner part is sort of key..

The thing is there are variables too.. like suspension sort of breaks in.. and just springs and a service might be fine.. great even and a whole lot cheaper.. It's up to the rider.  I've got to say that sooo many riders don't do shit to their suspension and just ride it. That's up to them.. but really opening the manual and reading the suspension section is recommended. . log current settings.. ride.. change settings.. log.. ride again... blah blah blah.. if it gets shitty just go back to what was or stock settings and go again... It's the simplest thing.. but guys sometimes just want to ride and wont be bothered to ever check their settings.. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Beta's in house suspension tuning.

the setups are totally different than what Krannie experienced. Beta got a new tuner starting early this year and the setups are all new and much better. I'm of course talking on the race team side of things, but the same tuner does them and similar setups. 

This past weekend I went out and rode a GP at Glen Helen on my son's 350RR. It's actually the first time I had  spent any time on his 2017 350 and I was blown away by how good the suspension is! I mean it's suppose to be setup for a pro rider endurocross rider not a slow middle aged guy thats 25 pounds heavier and way slower. Half way through practice Ty blew by me like I was standing still on his 300RR and I thought how can it feel so good to him too? As I rode more I realized even though it feels plush it still isn't bottoming out, even when I came up short and cased the jumps😂  

My point is the Factory Beta Suspension is really good stuff. It's really well balanced and makes turning the bike effortless, even  when not setup specifically for you. 

I'm definitely not saying everybody needs or should get it. Most of us do very well with the stock suspension and those that trust their own local guys should surely go with them. Beta is just giving guys another option. Something that you don't get with any other brand, so isn't that a good thing?

 

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ccullins said:

On Beta's in house suspension tuning.

the setups are totally different than what Krannie experienced. Beta got a new tuner starting early this year and the setups are all new and much better. I'm of course talking on the race team side of things, but the same tuner does them and similar setups. 

This past weekend I went out and rode a GP at Glen Helen on my son's 350RR. It's actually the first time I had  spent any time on his 2017 350 and I was blown away by how good the suspension is! I mean it's suppose to be setup for a pro rider endurocross rider not a slow middle aged guy thats 25 pounds heavier and way slower. Half way through practice Ty blew by me like I was standing still on his 300RR and I thought how can it feel so good to him too? As I rode more I realized even though it feels plush it still isn't bottoming out, even when I came up short and cased the jumps😂  

My point is the Factory Beta Suspension is really good stuff. It's really well balanced and makes turning the bike effortless, even  when not setup specifically for you. 

I'm definitely not saying everybody needs or should get it. Most of us do very well with the stock suspension and those that trust their own local guys should surely go with them. Beta is just giving guys another option. Something that you don't get with any other brand, so isn't that a good thing?

 

 

Awesome!! I have something else to look forward to... So now I have another thing on my wish list.. I'm cool with what I have but what you've described sounds perfect. I remember reading about Purvines Beta 498 rr race bike.. and the testers for the magazine.. dirtbike?? said something similar. It was that the 498rr was a race bike but it was plush and perfect for anyone to enjoy.. not like some other race bikes they had tried before..They liked the bike alot!!!.. but this is much better. This is a service we can all use.. and like krannie (and you) said no other manufacturer is providing special service like this.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ccullins said:

On Beta's in house suspension tuning.

the setups are totally different than what Krannie experienced. Beta got a new tuner starting early this year and the setups are all new and much better. I'm of course talking on the race team side of things, but the same tuner does them and similar setups. 

This past weekend I went out and rode a GP at Glen Helen on my son's 350RR. It's actually the first time I had  spent any time on his 2017 350 and I was blown away by how good the suspension is! I mean it's suppose to be setup for a pro rider endurocross rider not a slow middle aged guy thats 25 pounds heavier and way slower. Half way through practice Ty blew by me like I was standing still on his 300RR and I thought how can it feel so good to him too? As I rode more I realized even though it feels plush it still isn't bottoming out, even when I came up short and cased the jumps😂  

My point is the Factory Beta Suspension is really good stuff. It's really well balanced and makes turning the bike effortless, even  when not setup specifically for you. 

I'm definitely not saying everybody needs or should get it. Most of us do very well with the stock suspension and those that trust their own local guys should surely go with them. Beta is just giving guys another option. Something that you don't get with any other brand, so isn't that a good thing?

 

 

Sounds good for someone with a bunch of cash to burn. I'm willing to bet that almost anyone with a little patience can get bone stock OEM suspension working pretty damn good. I'm talking the average trail rider of course. As speeds increase and you are running a Glen Helen GP at "A" level then the stock suspension will more than likely fall short.

Speaking of casing jumps, the one thing that is a must for me is having good valving for the "G" outs and long sections of whoops in the desert. The OEM suspension does pretty darn good by simply cranking in preload and tightening rebound and compression. 

5 hours ago, THE KRAN said:

The best suspension you know is the suspension you are riding with now. 

Imagine if shoes only came in small, medium and large. You would have no idea of the difference buying shoes that would eliminate back pain, blisters, corns, bunions, etc.....

Remember, NO OTHER BRAND comes even close when it comes to offering real concrete options for bike tuning, direct from the factory. 

To me, riding stock suspension is exactly like trying to wear someone elses shoes.............. 

 

 

Actually the suspension I'm riding with now is not the best. It's only as good as I set it up for any given ride. There are so many adjustments that I can get it dialed in pretty darn good. The biggest thing I have learned over the years is no suspension is going to be good 100% of the time. I can get mine working great in about 80% of the stuff I ride. I just learn to adapt my riding for the other 20%.

An example would be my buddies bone stock 2008 CRF450. It really beat the crap out of me through the rock gardens and rutted rocky hills. When the speeds increased and was blasting through tight sand washes and whoops it was nothing short of amazing! I simply adapted to the bike for what it was designed for. Nothing more than running it a gear high and some clutch work for the nasty shit. Sure it beat me up. But not bad for just swinging a leg over it and riding.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, ballisticexchris said:

S

Speaking of casing jumps, the one thing that is a must for me is having good valving for the "G" outs and long sections of whoops in the desert. The OEM suspension does pretty darn good by simply cranking in preload and tightening rebound and compression. 

 

This is where the std suspension no matter where you have clickers or spring preload comes up really short. The front and rear smash though the stroke wallow and are just plain dangerous. The std rr settings no matter where the clickers are is only marginal for slow speed work only imho. Chris if you bought a 2018 and its has the same pistons in the suspension as your current bike. After break in would you send it to Dave and have it valved like your old bike or put up with it being potentially worse for 40-50 hrs then get it valved the same as your known good ride? How it takes you 40-50hrs to work out suspension is beyond me especially if you are writing down and testing how you can't do this is an hour to get and idea or which way you need to go surprises me. 

If you pull down the std rr shock and forks and have a rough idea of valving the issues are very very clear and its easy to improve it! Perfect well I don't like to use that word but much better with a shuffle of shims. Its like WP it makes tuners look good as std its way off the mark, the issues with the std rr are well documented if you know where to look no amount of clicker and or spring changes can fix this. Better yes maybe but no where near where it can be.

I see lots of guys fitting firmer springs and then changing the oil to one that is lighter than std I can't fathom as the std rebound stack in the sachs forks is laughable going firmer with no change here tells me people don't know what they are doing or ride very slowly. 

The race is a different story with its cc forks but the shock issues are the same. 

Using your clickers and experimenting is what people need to more as many don't change them from terrain to terrain which as you stated 3-4 clicks from sand wash outs etc etc. The issue had with my stock 2016 rr was I ran out of adjustment 2 clicks out on the comp and 6 on the rebound on hard pack the bike sucked same on the rear it was maxed out well not th rebound on the rear but its valved now to run further out than std. 

 

MM 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sent beta an email for pricing on my 2017 500 rr-s forks and shock, I'm thinking of having my long time suspension guy: Rick Johnson over at Too Tech handle a suspension service and spring change for me, but I also figure that it's in my best interest to give "Beta Factory Suspension" some consideration as well. 

I haven't really been doing much mx riding these last 13 years(ok, next to none), at least not until I got my new Beta, so I truly don't know what I need to have done if anything. I'm happy with the valving for now, so we'll see what happens when we get some new springs and fresh fluids, and I start riding her a little harder. Ive been finagling the clickers and it's working pretty good except that I weigh north of 225 pounds and the suspension has a bit too much sag even with the shock at maximum preload. :devil: I've stiffened up the compresion and the rebound and it works good when I've got her ripping, but I also like it back around the factory settings because it's soo darned plush when I'm just cruising around or in the slow rocky stuff. I think new springs will help this out and then we can go from there. i'm also not exactly riding as hard as I think I can, because of the soft springs of course.

The one thing though, is that I also think the soft springs lower the center of gravity on this machine and actually help the handling in some respects. So once I install the correct springs will it handle the slow off camber rocky stuff as good as it does now. Hmmm... :thinking: Becuase this bike is working pretty good at that, but in the open desert g-out whoops it can be a handful. I've bottomed her out a couple of times, so I've also made some adjustments to my riding style to compensate the softer springs. Next year I'mplanning on racing D37 desert, at least once or twice a month, on this bike, so I'm gonna spend the rest of this year trying to get me and her dialed. At least thats what I've told my wife and kids to get them to rally around me and support me in next years racing adventures.

I'd like to give  the service a shot myself, but I don't have any of the job specific tools necessary to get the job done properly nor confidently. I don't even know what tools I need. I read the fork and shock service manual, and so I'm cool with the spring change and drain, but the filling up part I'm not so sure about, and I'm pretty sure thats the important part. If anyone has some pointers for me I'm open to suggestions.

But yeah I contacted beta about it, and then after I sent my email to them, I got an email from them saying that they now offer this new beta factory suspension progrom, or what they call "BFS" .

:excuseme: what the heck???

I guess I'll find out their price tomorrow sometime. I've still gotta wait a couple of weeks untill my next mad money check clears, and I can get the xtrig shock preload do-hicky, and the springs and service stuff done, so it's cool.

I wonder if they'll let me cruise my suspension up to them and possibly even pick it up, Ive got friends up by Paso Robles that are constantly inviting me and my family over to their new digs for pool party, BBQ, and frisbee golf. Plus, I'd also like to visit the Beta dealership thats up there. I've heard its a good one.

I think it's pretty cool that they offer this, so I'm gonna check it out.

:cheers:

Edited by surfer-dude

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, MartyMOOSE said:

This is where the std suspension no matter where you have clickers or spring preload comes up really short. The front and rear smash though the stroke wallow and are just plain dangerous. The std rr settings no matter where the clickers are is only marginal for slow speed work only imho. Chris if you bought a 2018 and its has the same pistons in the suspension as your current bike. After break in would you send it to Dave and have it valved like your old bike or put up with it being potentially worse for 40-50 hrs then get it valved the same as your known good ride? How it takes you 40-50hrs to work out suspension is beyond me especially if you are writing down and testing how you can't do this is an hour to get and idea or which way you need to go surprises me. 

If you pull down the std rr shock and forks and have a rough idea of valving the issues are very very clear and its easy to improve it! Perfect well I don't like to use that word but much better with a shuffle of shims. Its like WP it makes tuners look good as std its way off the mark, the issues with the std rr are well documented if you know where to look no amount of clicker and or spring changes can fix this. Better yes maybe but no where near where it can be.

I see lots of guys fitting firmer springs and then changing the oil to one that is lighter than std I can't fathom as the std rebound stack in the sachs forks is laughable going firmer with no change here tells me people don't know what they are doing or ride very slowly. 

The race is a different story with its cc forks but the shock issues are the same. 

Using your clickers and experimenting is what people need to more as many don't change them from terrain to terrain which as you stated 3-4 clicks from sand wash outs etc etc. The issue had with my stock 2016 rr was I ran out of adjustment 2 clicks out on the comp and 6 on the rebound on hard pack the bike sucked same on the rear it was maxed out well not th rebound on the rear but its valved now to run further out than std. 

 

MM 

As stated I'm pretty good at adapting to what I ride and see no need to send out for revalve until stock oil and bushings are worn out. I just run what I got and and make the best of it. We all have different riding styles and abilities. If I was a AA racer hitting the GP circuit and racing desert at full speed I might be singing a different tune. I can't comment on the OEM Sachs fork as I have the Marzocchi 45's. Of course they are both open cartridge forks so both can be valved just about the same as any other OC fork. The game changer for me is the high speed compression knob on the shock. This is the first bike I've owned with that extra tuning. I simply reach down and back it off a few clicks for rock gardens or tighten for higher speed sharp edged stuff.

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos to Beta for refining their suspension tuning abilities for the public. And since 7 out of 10 Beta's sold here in the USA are outfitted with OC forks I look forward in hearing how Beta's new suspension services work for the standard Sachs stuff.

I've never subscribed to the mindset that one size fits all when it comes to shoes or suspension valving. Many here "can" live with off the shelf suspension and are happy and thats cool, just never worked for me. Like many I've spent my funds happily to achieve a level of control that gives me the confidence to ride faster and safer much more comfortably. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, MartyMOOSE said:

This is where the std suspension no matter where you have clickers or spring preload comes up really short. The front and rear smash though the stroke wallow and are just plain dangerous. The std rr settings no matter where the clickers are is only marginal for slow speed work only imho. Chris if you bought a 2018 and its has the same pistons in the suspension as your current bike. After break in would you send it to Dave and have it valved like your old bike or put up with it being potentially worse for 40-50 hrs then get it valved the same as your known good ride? How it takes you 40-50hrs to work out suspension is beyond me especially if you are writing down and testing how you can't do this is an hour to get and idea or which way you need to go surprises me. 

If you pull down the std rr shock and forks and have a rough idea of valving the issues are very very clear and its easy to improve it! Perfect well I don't like to use that word but much better with a shuffle of shims. Its like WP it makes tuners look good as std its way off the mark, the issues with the std rr are well documented if you know where to look no amount of clicker and or spring changes can fix this. Better yes maybe but no where near where it can be.

I see lots of guys fitting firmer springs and then changing the oil to one that is lighter than std I can't fathom as the std rebound stack in the sachs forks is laughable going firmer with no change here tells me people don't know what they are doing or ride very slowly. 

The race is a different story with its cc forks but the shock issues are the same. 

Using your clickers and experimenting is what people need to more as many don't change them from terrain to terrain which as you stated 3-4 clicks from sand wash outs etc etc. The issue had with my stock 2016 rr was I ran out of adjustment 2 clicks out on the comp and 6 on the rebound on hard pack the bike sucked same on the rear it was maxed out well not th rebound on the rear but its valved now to run further out than std. 

 

MM 

It's not so much WP settings but KTM/Husqvarna's. WP is nothing more then a supplier and will supply suspensions with any shim stacks requested. Sherco while they have WP components are not the same set-up as what you will find on KTM. Like with all brands, set-up from testing gives the best out of box experience and in USA we don't ride like the Europeans!

6 hours ago, ballisticexchris said:

As stated I'm pretty good at adapting to what I ride and see no need to send out for revalve until stock oil and bushings are worn out. I just run what I got and and make the best of it. We all have different riding styles and abilities. If I was a AA racer hitting the GP circuit and racing desert at full speed I might be singing a different tune. I can't comment on the OEM Sachs fork as I have the Marzocchi 45's. Of course they are both open cartridge forks so both can be valved just about the same as any other OC fork. The game changer for me is the high speed compression knob on the shock. This is the first bike I've owned with that extra tuning. I simply reach down and back it off a few clicks for rock gardens or tighten for higher speed sharp edged stuff.

 

 

 

I said this many times any skill level will benefit from "A" kit suspension. I would put suspension before any motor/exhaust/bling budget especially as you get older. Sure the faster you are the more you will appreciate the money spent but great suspension builds confidence which leads to reducing the learning curve. Beginners struggle with trail obstacles mostly from improper suspension set-up.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, surfer-dude said:

I sent beta an email for pricing on my 2017 500 rr-s forks and shock, I'm thinking of having my long time suspension guy: Rick Johnson over at Too Tech handle a suspension service and spring change for me, but I also figure that it's in my best interest to give "Beta Factory Suspension" some consideration as well. 

I haven't really been doing much mx riding these last 13 years(ok, next to none), at least not until I got my new Beta, so I truly don't know what I need to have done if anything. I'm happy with the valving for now, so we'll see what happens when we get some new springs and fresh fluids, and I start riding her a little harder. Ive been finagling the clickers and it's working pretty good except that I weigh north of 225 pounds and the suspension has a bit too much sag even with the shock at maximum preload. :devil: I've stiffened up the compresion and the rebound and it works good when I've got her ripping, but I also like it back around the factory settings because it's soo darned plush when I'm just cruising around or in the slow rocky stuff. I think new springs will help this out and then we can go from there. i'm also not exactly riding as hard as I think I can, because of the soft springs of course.

The one thing though, is that I also think the soft springs lower the center of gravity on this machine and actually help the handling in some respects. So once I install the correct springs will it handle the slow off camber rocky stuff as good as it does now. Hmmm... :thinking: Becuase this bike is working pretty good at that, but in the open desert g-out whoops it can be a handful. I've bottomed her out a couple of times, so I've also made some adjustments to my riding style to compensate the softer springs. Next year I'mplanning on racing D37 desert, at least once or twice a month, on this bike, so I'm gonna spend the rest of this year trying to get me and her dialed. At least thats what I've told my wife and kids to get them to rally around me and support me in next years racing adventures.

I'd like to give  the service a shot myself, but I don't have any of the job specific tools necessary to get the job done properly nor confidently. I don't even know what tools I need. I read the fork and shock service manual, and so I'm cool with the spring change and drain, but the filling up part I'm not so sure about, and I'm pretty sure thats the important part. If anyone has some pointers for me I'm open to suggestions.

But yeah I contacted beta about it, and then after I sent my email to them, I got an email from them saying that they now offer this new beta factory suspension progrom, or what they call "BFS" .

:excuseme: what the heck???

I guess I'll find out their price tomorrow sometime. I've still gotta wait a couple of weeks untill my next mad money check clears, and I can get the xtrig shock preload do-hicky, and the springs and service stuff done, so it's cool.

I wonder if they'll let me cruise my suspension up to them and possibly even pick it up, Ive got friends up by Paso Robles that are constantly inviting me and my family over to their new digs for pool party, BBQ, and frisbee golf. Plus, I'd also like to visit the Beta dealership thats up there. I've heard its a good one.

I think it's pretty cool that they offer this, so I'm gonna check it out.

:cheers:

The way the program works is you go through your dealer. You take your suspension to your dealer and they send it out. They can also get you the pricing. 

Beta is trying to do everything through their dealers and hopefully this will build up the dealer base much stronger here in the U.S.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, ballisticexchris said:

As stated I'm pretty good at adapting to what I ride and see no need to send out for revalve until stock oil and bushings are worn out. I just run what I got and and make the best of it. We all have different riding styles and abilities. If I was a AA racer hitting the GP circuit and racing desert at full speed I might be singing a different tune. I can't comment on the OEM Sachs fork as I have the Marzocchi 45's. Of course they are both open cartridge forks so both can be valved just about the same as any other OC fork. The game changer for me is the high speed compression knob on the shock. This is the first bike I've owned with that extra tuning. I simply reach down and back it off a few clicks for rock gardens or tighten for higher speed sharp edged stuff.

 

 

 

Stock is good enough for me and if, God forbid, I go faster than my suspension, I'll slow down. Some of us guys have to go slow so we can stop and peel you fast guys off the trees and rocks. I think Beta is doing a good service, but it seems Beta does things right after the fact and for a price IMO.  Still like the Xtrainers, having a blast on them going slow around and not through the trees....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found that the suspension on my 13 KTM 350 made the bike easier to stay upright in the rocks after Donny Lingle set it up.  My Beta was 2yrs old when I purchased it, so I had it resprung/revolved while it was being serviced.  

I don't race, but the suspension work does make a difference for me.

Rgksr

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting modifications for sure:

http://betausa.com/content/beta-suspension

I have to say I'm a bit sceptical. "Factory" high/low speed compression adjuster installed for finer tuning? My gosh how much more finer tuning do you need? Shock is converted to bladder system. I have the bladder conversion on my KTM and piston on the Beta. Both shocks get very hot. I like the bladder conversion on my WP shock just for the fact it's much easier and faster to service and does not require the Nitrogen charging bolt/needle/tool to service. As far as it being better on square edge bumps and running cooler, that's subjective from rider to rider. When I ride my KTM and Beta back to back I can see no difference on the hard hits in the rocks other than my 50lb lighter 2T "bounces" over them. Both bladder and piston systems work equally well. I'm getting close to 300hrs on the Sachs piston. My WER bladder on the KTM failed at around 225hrs and had to be replaced. So piston seems to be more reliable.

I will say the marketing is good. OTOH, I also see how this takes money out of the pockets of dealers who already tune suspension for their customers. I'm willing to bet that Beta has some kind of clause in the dealer contract that encourages dealers to send it out instead of doing it in house. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, ballisticexchris said:

Interesting modifications for sure:

http://betausa.com/content/beta-suspension

I have to say I'm a bit sceptical. "Factory" high/low speed compression adjuster installed for finer tuning? My gosh how much more finer tuning do you need? Shock is converted to bladder system. I have the bladder conversion on my KTM and piston on the Beta. Both shocks get very hot. I like the bladder conversion on my WP shock just for the fact it's much easier and faster to service and does not require the Nitrogen charging bolt/needle/tool to service. As far as it being better on square edge bumps and running cooler, that's subjective from rider to rider. When I ride my KTM and Beta back to back I can see no difference on the hard hits in the rocks other than my 50lb lighter 2T "bounces" over them. Both bladder and piston systems work equally well. I'm getting close to 300hrs on the Sachs piston. My WER bladder on the KTM failed at around 225hrs and had to be replaced. So piston seems to be more reliable.

I will say the marketing is good. OTOH, I also see how this takes money out of the pockets of dealers who already tune suspension for their customers. I'm willing to bet that Beta has some kind of clause in the dealer contract that encourages dealers to send it out instead of doing it in house. 

 

 

Negative on the bold.

I'm very picky about my suspension and no way I could suffer a year on stock suspension.  I had Steve from After Hours Cycle do my 17 390 race before I even rode it.  He's a great guy and even put my forks on his bike to break them in before the valving.  There was still tons of snow here and once it was gone I needed my bike so he offered to do that which was awesome.  Very happy with the work he did.  He's going to get business from my customers too, if I can get them to give up there bikes for a little bit. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×