Jump to content

Fine dirt in engine after hydrolocking bike?

Recommended Posts

My 300 took on water during a really deep (top of tire) river crossing.  It never fell over, but just stalled out.

I walked it out and now I've got it home, I did the usual pull the plug and invert while cycling the engine.

But I did notice there was some gritty water that got past the air filter.  Do I have to tear down and clean the engine, or is it good to go? 

It wasn't a lot of dirt, just some really fine grit that I could feel with my fingers.

 

FWIW, from the gopro footage, it looked like I was doing ~5K RPM in 1st gear when it took a drink and stalled.  Engine should be OK?  There were no bad noises before it died, and it seemed to be cycling fine when I pumped out the water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Colorado^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you run it since getting the water out? If it's in the cylinder, it will score it and the piston pretty quick, then you're looking at a replating job. The grit isn't good on bearings either.

Personally, I think I'd pull the cylinder and piston, flush everything real good. Clean the piston and cylinder.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A trick to riding deep crossings is don't over run/out run the bow wake. The water level is usually lower behind the wake and you try to keep the airbox around that point as you ride thru.

You clearly were out running it, trying to get thru as quickly as possible.

Be sure your carb vent lines are T'ed and routed up under the seat too.

Edited by Trailryder42
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It did not look that deep until you actually stopped and then it looked like it was definitely getting into the air box.

I wish you the best of luck in getting your bike running. That looks like a really cool place to ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Trailryder42 said:

Have you run it since getting the water out? If it's in the cylinder, it will score it and the piston pretty quick, then you're looking at a replating job. The grit isn't good on bearings either.

Personally, I think I'd pull the cylinder and piston, flush everything real good. Clean the piston and cylinder.

No, I haven't started it, but I did obviously cycle the engine about 20 times to pump the water out.

Once I take off the head, what do I use to clean it?  Diesel (will have to go get) or will contact cleaner work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For flushing the case, I'd use diesel, and in a well ventilated area. Use soap and water on the cylinder and piston.

For flushing the case, I'd take the engine out of the frame. A lot of work but better than replacing bearings, con rod bearing and other stuff later if you don't do an adequate job.

Edited by Trailryder42
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Trailryder42 said:

A trick to riding deep crossings is don't over run/out run the bow wake. The water level is usually lower behind the wake and you try to keep the airbox around that point as you ride thru.

You clearly were out running it, trying to get thru as quickly as possible.

Be sure your carb vent lines are T'ed and routed up under the seat too.

Thanks for the suggestions.  I've done this water crossing many, many times and it's never been a problem before.  For some reason the water was extra deep and I think someone in a 4x4 got stuck and chewed out the bottom.

Normally I can just cruse through, but this time I could feel the bike getting stuck on the bottom (mud?) and so I gave it some gas.

I'm running a smart carb, so no vent lines to worry about!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Kawabuggy said:

It did not look that deep until you actually stopped and then it looked like it was definitely getting into the air box.

I wish you the best of luck in getting your bike running. That looks like a really cool place to ride.

Thanks.  It's a cool place to ride, but it wasn't much fun pushing my bike out 3 miles.  At least it was slightly downhill most of the way!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Trailryder42 said:

For flushing the case, I'd use diesel, and in a well ventilated area. Use soap and water on the cylinder and piston.

For flushing the case, I'd take the engine out of the frame. A lot of work but better than replacing bearings, con rod bearing and other stuff later if you don't do an adequate job.

If I take the engine out, do I have to split the case to clean it, or can I just rinse/flush it out with diesel 4 or 5 times.  Sorry if that's a dumb question!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I wouldn't split the case. Just having it out of the frame makes it easier to manipulate while flushing it and you're more apt to do a better flush job.

Edited by Trailryder42

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Trailryder42 said:

No, I wouldn't split the case. Just having it out of the frame makes it easier to manipulate while flushing it and you're more apt to do a better flush job.

Thanks, that's what I though, but I wanted to make sure.  I really appreciate your help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are concerned about water and grit having gotten into a 2-stroke then that water and grit will be in the crankcase along with the crank bearings.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't get the time to pull the engine tonight, so I removed the reeds and filled up the crank case with diesel.  Also put some in the cylinder, via the plug hole.

Was that the right thing to do, to prevent rust until I can flush it all out tomorrow afternoon?

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Wild Alaskan said:

Just run it, most mine have seen much worse. Also the sooner you run it the faster you get that corrosive water off of your precision components 

11059565_1130151353684038_66315469744813

That's some mud you got there!

Since I just had the engine professionally rebuilt as 330 big bore, I think I'll flush it out a few times.

No doubt if I had of had the tools on me, I would have just got the water out and continued on my merry way.  But since I went to all that trouble to walk it out...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if they make snorkels for bikes, like they have on Jeeps and stuff. That would be a great idea.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ASP1227 said:

I wonder if they make snorkels for bikes, like they have on Jeeps and stuff. That would be a great idea.....

Long ago I owned a 1984 Honda ATC 200X 3-wheeler 

by memory, the fully sealed airbox' air intake was thru the hollow upper frame tube,

with two smallish shrouded inlet ports just behind the steering head.

 

Neat setup but no doubt quite restrictive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's pretty neat, seems like a great idea. In these new bikes it seems like they don't really do much to protect the air box from water, it would be nice though, just to have the peace of mind when making a deep crossing. I was watching a video on YouTube a few days ago, a guy was on a new Husky 300 in the rain and he dropped it in a puddle, and it wouldn't run after that. It's not like he was crossing a river, he literally dropped in a puddle and hydrolocked it. I thought it was kinda ridiculous, but I guess there's a reason we call em dirtbikes and not waterbikes lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it were my bike I'd completely disassemble the engine after finding gritty water.  Not that big a deal on a 2t.  I'd be checking every bearing closely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×