Jump to content

Tubliss questions

Recommended Posts

I installed Tubliss on the front and rear of my CRF 230F this weekend, I always ran 10 psi rear 12 psi front cause where we ride has some sharp rocks and I wanted to avoid flats, with the Tubliss I dropped down to 6 psi rear and 8 psi front, I still have the junk stock tires but am ordering new as soon as I figure out what I want, but anyway I noticed that it seems like I have way more bottom end power now, first and second gear wheelies require only a heavy dose of throttle now and not a lot of pulling on the bars, makes me happy but I am curious is it from increased traction, or has the lower psi caused the gearing to change due to a slightly smaller diameter of the rear tire, anyone else with Tubliss notice this.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be a combo of 2 things. 1. The reduced pressure increases the contact patch and the traction so it makes it hook up harder. 2. The reduced weight vs tubes decreases the rotational mass which means less power to spin the wheels. I have also heard reports from people who were very sensitive saying they can feel their suspension working differently due to the decreased weight in the wheels. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jlt31971 said:

I installed Tubliss on the front and rear of my CRF 230F this weekend, I always ran 10 psi rear 12 psi front cause where we ride has some sharp rocks and I wanted to avoid flats, with the Tubliss I dropped down to 6 psi rear and 8 psi front, I still have the junk stock tires but am ordering new as soon as I figure out what I want, but anyway I noticed that it seems like I have way more bottom end power now, first and second gear wheelies require only a heavy dose of throttle now and not a lot of pulling on the bars, makes me happy but I am curious is it from increased traction, or has the lower psi caused the gearing to change due to a slightly smaller diameter of the rear tire, anyone else with Tubliss notice this.  Thanks

I noticed the same thing, and wondered the same thing (why do I have more bottom end) when I went tubliss.

When you get new tires, make sure they are at least 4 ply, otherwise the tires get squirmy at low pressures.  I usually run 3 in back and 5 in front, but every tire is a little different.

 

Edited by Colorado^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be interesting to calculate the difference in the final drive ratio per inch (or mm) of radius of the rear wheel. Maybe there's a math wizard around here who can figure that out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, motovita said:

It would be interesting to calculate the difference in the final drive ratio per inch (or mm) of radius of the rear wheel. Maybe there's a math wizard around here who can figure that out.

Sure, calculate circumference 2*pi*r of the two different sizes. This gives you the amount of feet traveled per revolution and you can compare the distances traveled. If you want to get real technical you can download this excel sheet and edit it to calculate far more than you needed
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1I8_YKi-ttV9fBmvOMBMaDvIrZiH5Lywt0SeNGtc6uog/edit?usp=sharing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're defininatly (spelling) gonna get way more hookup running 6psi vs 10 on the rear. 8 is pretty low for the front, Tubliss or not.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

8 hours ago, turborex696 said:

It could be a combo of 2 things. 1. The reduced pressure increases the contact patch and the traction so it makes it hook up harder. 2. The reduced weight vs tubes decreases the rotational mass which means less power to spin the wheels. I have also heard reports from people who were very sensitive saying they can feel their suspension working differently due to the decreased weight in the wheels. 

I've run Tubliss front/rear on several bikes and the lower tire pressure definitely increases traction. I've also damaged the casing on a front tire to the point it would not hold air by running it too many miles when flat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


×